10

votes

Anyone else notice how food is becoming the new politics/religion?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created September 12, 2012 at 12:52 AM

I find it interesting how people not only get offended/defensive when I share diet-related information with them -- information that, of course, doesn't align with the mainstream rhetoric -- but also when I'm simply doing my own thing and not trying to convince anyone of anything. I swear, some of the people around me act as though my personal food habits are a direct insult to them. I've also noticed a significant degree of mental interference from others when discussing food/diet, much like the interference one receives when attempting to discuss religion and politics. I think as the health of America and the western world at large continues to deteriorate, food will take center stage in the public discourse, even surpassing forces as driving as religion and politics.

Bb3d1772b28c02da2426e40dfcb533f5

(5381)

on September 12, 2012
at 12:06 PM

That defense mechanism in the face of confronted beleifs, is called "cognitive dissonance" in psychology. Its the same thing that makes seventh day advertists so irrational. Its SOOO common, in all sorts of areas of life, and even more so on the net...

Bb3d1772b28c02da2426e40dfcb533f5

(5381)

on September 12, 2012
at 12:06 PM

That defense mechanism in the face of confronted beleifs, is called "cognitive dissonance" in psychology. Its the same thing that makes seventh day advertists so irrational. Its SOOO common, in all sorts of areas of life. Part of the reason arguing on the internet is so common..

87b7d250ea30415ed4c1afd809f4053f

(968)

on September 12, 2012
at 11:37 AM

Yeah, what he said :)

B6114a1980b1481fb18206064f3f4a4f

(3924)

on September 12, 2012
at 02:55 AM

Well said, Anon.

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4 Answers

18
3d58b5fb4f9780e2f47d4dcc53338a5a

(2771)

on September 12, 2012
at 01:10 AM

As I always say to my kids, never discuss politics, religion and diet. What all of these have in common is that everyone thinks they're right. If you contradict them with something silly like, I don't know, evidence, they have two choices. Either they have to reconcile the fact that their core belief system is flawed and they have to rethink everything else in their life, or they have to vigorously defend their beliefs, either by attacking your evidence with their evidence, or attack you personally if they don't have any solid evidence.

When I'm at work and eating bacon, they used to say how unhealthy I was, but they saw that I lost 40 lbs over time, and I would always bring my bloodwork in to show them that it was working. Out of the 40+ people at the office, only one person has recently asked me how he can do the same, and that's after 4 years. I see in most people's reaction that they don't want to deal with the truth, because that would make them responsible for what's happening in their life, and that means change... and change usually scares people.

The real problem comes in with all these (politics, religion and diet) is that one person's "black and white" doesn't always match with others. What we see here in this forum all the time is that everyone is built slightly different, and what works for one doesn't always work for others. So even here knows (or at least is pretty sure) of what works for them, and when we hear someone else can't do what we do, or is eating something we would never eat, we have to either have to research and/or experiment, or we have to tell the other person why they're horribly wrong.

Bb3d1772b28c02da2426e40dfcb533f5

(5381)

on September 12, 2012
at 12:06 PM

That defense mechanism in the face of confronted beleifs, is called "cognitive dissonance" in psychology. Its the same thing that makes seventh day advertists so irrational. Its SOOO common, in all sorts of areas of life, and even more so on the net...

B6114a1980b1481fb18206064f3f4a4f

(3924)

on September 12, 2012
at 02:55 AM

Well said, Anon.

Bb3d1772b28c02da2426e40dfcb533f5

(5381)

on September 12, 2012
at 12:06 PM

That defense mechanism in the face of confronted beleifs, is called "cognitive dissonance" in psychology. Its the same thing that makes seventh day advertists so irrational. Its SOOO common, in all sorts of areas of life. Part of the reason arguing on the internet is so common..

87b7d250ea30415ed4c1afd809f4053f

(968)

on September 12, 2012
at 11:37 AM

Yeah, what he said :)

4
98266ae0c87836d4bb714b6d31cacbf9

on September 12, 2012
at 01:01 AM

I used to think like that. Then I questioned myself, why do I feel bad or give energy to other peoples opinions? The problem occurs when people think they are superior. I know for a fact that people who follow the paleo diet think they are superior(better off) than the rest who eat SAD food. Yes , of course our health is better but it doesn't mean we are superior. Some way or the other we manage to show that off, usually unconsciously hence the resentment from people not eating the paleo way. Keep eating the way you are eating, don't bother or engage in these types of conversations.

1
0d0842381492a41b2173a04014aae810

(4875)

on September 12, 2012
at 12:09 PM

Zizek has suggested that ecology is becoming the new religion (in the sense of from-above sort of commands like: "you can't do this, it will have an impact on the earth, and you better not question that"), and I think either way it is indicative of a shift towards a more and more agnostic society, wherein empirical and tangible evidence are exalted.

Generally, I'm in favor of this, but the problem that I have with it is that people still haven't learned to think and to question for themselves, they simply have shifted the core of their faith-based approach to life, and as with the original faith-based/from-above/unquestionable philosophies on life, it is ultimately the word of a select few humans, those that are in the proper position of power to decree information in the context currently revered.

On the upside, it gives us nerds more say in things than I think a lot of us ever conceived of. But on the downside, it gives the media the power to present cases such as "a new study says red meat will kill you" and have a majority of their audience believe what they are presenting, without questioning the methods and the information used to come to that conclusion.

I think a lot of the challenge of being an exceptional scientist right now is seeing this sensationalism and considering the entire snowball effect that can be created by a carefully crafted publication - while still being true to the method and to yourself.

1
96440612cf0fcf366bf5ad8f776fca84

(19413)

on September 12, 2012
at 11:21 AM

SAD eaters have grown up with lots of food pyramid propaganda. They're going to react badly when told that everything they "know" is upside down.

Of course there are going to be political and economic reasons for the FDA's recommendation - many in support of big agra, far less in support of human health. But your cow-orkers and friends and family aren't going to be aware of these issues, and if you point these things out, they'll think you've gone conspiracy theory on them.

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