2

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1g protein per lb of bodyweight equals calorie restriction?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created April 30, 2012 at 3:45 AM

Is it just me or does following the 1g protein/lb of bodyweight with meals constructed around non-starchy vegies and protein/fat (aka meat) automatically put you in calorie restriction?

Let me expand: Robb Wolf (kudos to the guy) suggests 1g/lb of bodyweight and meals constructed around vegies, protein and not too much added fat for the purposes of leaning out. He elaborates this in podcast ep 125. In podcast ep 97, Kurt Harris says something to the same affect of: if you're not eating dairy and you're not eating starch, then where are you getting your calories. The guideline for calories/lb of bodyweight to lean out thrown around is something like 15cals/lb of bodyweight. I'm 154lbs, so that would be rouyghtl 2300cals/day. As for protein it would be roughly 600g mince meat/day. When I add in for the vegies and cooking fat, it brings me to around 2000cal/day.

Does this sound about right? If anyone lost the questrion there let me know and I'll try to clear it up....

091423a30c0188fbff51e39397e7e056

(384)

on August 28, 2012
at 06:34 AM

Would this mean at 340lbs I should be getting 340g of protein a day?

Medium avatar

(2923)

on April 30, 2012
at 02:46 PM

Item 1) because I'm more used to (often) seeing that misconception on here. Item 2) answers your question: your extra calories should be coming from fat, there's no need for calorie restriction. Gary Taubes in *Good Calories, Bad Calories* points to trials where patients lost weight on a 3000 calorie low carbohydrate diet.

624a43b05fd8cc7a32c9c3114785d192

(85)

on April 30, 2012
at 09:54 AM

i was linking the protein recommendation with john welbourne's guideling of 15cals/lb of bodyweight. so if you're shooting for 200g of protein i'm guessing you're around 200lb which puts yourdaily calories around 3000cals, so still plenty of space for vegies etc...

9f54852ea376e8e416356f547611e052

(2957)

on April 30, 2012
at 09:18 AM

How is this getting voted up?

624a43b05fd8cc7a32c9c3114785d192

(85)

on April 30, 2012
at 07:28 AM

i know it's 1 gram of protein per pound of bodyweight, i never said 1 gram of meat. 154lb guy=154 grams protein per day approximates 600g of mince meat per day. thankyou for coming no where near to addressing the question....

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7 Answers

7
Medium avatar

(2923)

on April 30, 2012
at 04:13 AM

1) That's 1 gram of protein, not 1 gram of meat. As an example, a quarter pound (4 oz) of 85% lean ground beef has approximately 20g of protein.

2) Paul Jaminet explains it the clearest: By calories, Paleo is high fat, medium protein, low carbohydrate. By weight, Paleo is mostly vegetable.

9f54852ea376e8e416356f547611e052

(2957)

on April 30, 2012
at 09:18 AM

How is this getting voted up?

Medium avatar

(2923)

on April 30, 2012
at 02:46 PM

Item 1) because I'm more used to (often) seeing that misconception on here. Item 2) answers your question: your extra calories should be coming from fat, there's no need for calorie restriction. Gary Taubes in *Good Calories, Bad Calories* points to trials where patients lost weight on a 3000 calorie low carbohydrate diet.

624a43b05fd8cc7a32c9c3114785d192

(85)

on April 30, 2012
at 07:28 AM

i know it's 1 gram of protein per pound of bodyweight, i never said 1 gram of meat. 154lb guy=154 grams protein per day approximates 600g of mince meat per day. thankyou for coming no where near to addressing the question....

1
F690de6e86fda05bf1b4c2ed834c477b

(180)

on April 30, 2012
at 08:42 AM

From my experience (and I'm about 50lbs heavier than you are), if I tried to consume 1g of protein per lb of bodyweight without using protein shakes I would easily eclipse the restricted calories needed to lean out. For example, today is a heavy lifting day for me. I'm going to consume 60g of protein in a shake for lunch at just 270 calories. I'm also going to eat 125g of beef steak for another 34g of protein and 315 calories (according to FitDay). If I were to eliminate the shake and double the steak I'd have to consume 945 calories just to get me to 102g of protein.

To double it again to get to my goal of 200g of protein per day, I'd be at 1890 calories just in steak alone. That doesn't leave much room for vegetables, per Cerement's comment above. Given that you're lighter than me, my guess is that your BMR is quite a bit lower and you're going to have a hard time restricting your calories and eating 1g protein per 1lb of bodyweight per day.

Of course, you can consume a ton of tuna, chicken breasts, or eggs but, again, it's not going to leave much wiggle room for vegetables.

Anyway, that's just my perspective as someone who's in the same boat as you are, trying to consume a bunch of protein (while still staying/getting lean).

624a43b05fd8cc7a32c9c3114785d192

(85)

on April 30, 2012
at 09:54 AM

i was linking the protein recommendation with john welbourne's guideling of 15cals/lb of bodyweight. so if you're shooting for 200g of protein i'm guessing you're around 200lb which puts yourdaily calories around 3000cals, so still plenty of space for vegies etc...

1
Eea6a68f5a7190d13c60e1c72417a581

(1376)

on April 30, 2012
at 04:34 AM

Others calculate g protein per kg of estimated lean body mass. In answer to your question, yes. De facto calorie restriction makes for weight loss on this eating plan. Fat provides satiety and increased absorption of nutrients from vegtables. Ditching dairy is key for many people to meet their goals.

0
503cc5f1a16a160752dc2f777b5af5e9

on August 28, 2012
at 04:48 AM

As per your original question, it depends. I've been on the Zone Diet (9g carb to 7g protein, minimal fat), while also restricting myself to about 180 g protein a day. I eat VERY low fat foods: deli meats, fish, fat free/low carb dairy, protein powder, and high carb fruits of all kinds. This totals about 3000 cal a day, and about 180 g protein or more.

Starting at about 188 pounds, I easily drop to 178 to 182 in an active week. Yes, one week. Some weeks I'll bicycle 3 days (daily: 5 to 12 miles sprints/coasting as if bodybuilding), but some weeks I'll drive instead because I have to do 3 to 6 hours extreme tree lopping, where I can gain an inch on my chest in 2 or 3 weeks. Some weeks I have the energy for actual upper body workouts (easy bodybuilding, 6 sets of 6 exercises, no bis or tris).

I have to eat extra meals and bust my gut to keep from losing weight. And I stay warm, which cuts calorie needs by 50%.

So, in my case, yes, this is a restrictive diet. But if you eat fat-rich proteins, like red meat, cheese, hot dogs, bologna, whole hams, etc, then you'll probably gain weight, and not the good kind!

0
Cf416725f639ffd1bb90764792ce7b8a

(2799)

on April 30, 2012
at 02:07 PM

Most weightlifting sites I've read mention 10-12 cals/pound for getting lean, not 15 cals/pound.

0
Ebb10603524dd22621c1155dd7ddf106

(19150)

on April 30, 2012
at 01:42 PM

In previous answers here, you've noted that you are linking the "1g per 1lb of bodyweight" for protein with "15Cal per 1lb of bodyweight" from John Welbourne's how-to-lean-out info.

Going with that, I can say that seems way to high unless you are into very high levels of training. I'm doing moderate training (187lb now, 5'10'') and 12-13 Calories per 1lb of bodyweight with 400-700Calorie deficit workouts (and ~500 deficit from diet on rest days) keeps my weightloss at a steady 1lb/week (with lean body mass not fluctuating).

I can see myself eating 15C/1lb if I worked out 2-3 hours per day and I was a professional athelete. However, this is not something that is congruent with my lifestyle or body type. :-)

However, even at ~2300-2400 Calories/day, I often struggle to reach my food and calorie goals in a fun/zesty/non-boring way. I do not drink protein shakes, but prefer actual meat, fish, and eggs to reach 1g/1lb a day of protein. I tend to use dense starches like sweet potatoes, cassava, (actual) yams, plantains, and more -- all cooked in lovely fats -- to round out my caloric goals for the day, as well as helping to replenish glycogen.

So, I think your question is totally valid and interesting, but I think you are either a) training a lot and not eating enough (as you even guess) or b) assuming you should be eating a lot more than you actually should be. If your at 154lbs (and of average height), I'm going to guess that you simply need to eat a lot more -- sounds like you are training pretty hard. Props. :-)

0
1a98a40ba8ffdc5aa28d1324d01c6c9f

(20378)

on April 30, 2012
at 08:10 AM

It is a great way to lose weight. Eat meat, seafood and non-starchy vegetables is very good for weight loss. I would throw in eggs if you wanted to as well. You will be able to eat that much meat with no problem. The veggies are going to add a lot of bulk. Between the two you are not going to have room for the bad foods and you should lose weight like crazy on this diet. It is at least a very good place to start.

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