2

votes

does anyone else get tired of answers always referencing "experts" or bloggers?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created June 26, 2012 at 3:10 PM

One can't help but notice how even the most reasoned responses typically include a site to a so-called paleo expert or someone well-known in paleo world to buttress or validate their opinion. Does anyone else find to be irritating and at times, lame? (Granted some inclusion of sources for further information is helpful but merely say xxx agrees w me or says x, y, z I don't find that to be especially helpful). As an aside Ill admit the so-called big names are very knowledgable but . . .

1edb06ded9ccf098a4517ca4a7a34ebc

(14952)

on June 29, 2012
at 02:12 AM

While I initially agreed with your question, upon 10 seconds more though, I have to stand by SB.

6120c989fd5b69f42a0834b69b87955b

(24553)

on June 26, 2012
at 07:22 PM

When I don't reference someone who knows more than I do, I'm essentially talking outta my ass, so I will continue to quote and reference those doing the research or who have more experience than I do.

Ce7e28769d92d5de5533e775b1de966e

on June 26, 2012
at 04:16 PM

Totally agree, yes yes!

98bf2ca7f8778c79cd3f6c962011cfdc

(24286)

on June 26, 2012
at 03:49 PM

Often times people become well-known because of the value of their contribution to the discussion. You admit they are very knowledgeable but you think it's lame for people to reference these very knowledgeable people? I don't understand that.

5ccb98f6ae42ce87e206cf3f6a86039f

(11581)

on June 26, 2012
at 03:48 PM

+1 for "paralysis by analysis." BIG beginner problem.

98bf2ca7f8778c79cd3f6c962011cfdc

(24286)

on June 26, 2012
at 03:46 PM

Amen! I have no problem deferring to Sisson or Wolf or any of the other leaders. They seem to know a hell of a lot more than most and definitely more than I do. Mark especially has written some fantastic pieces on a variety of subjects. He's easy to read and understand and I love pointing people in his direction.

1edb06ded9ccf098a4517ca4a7a34ebc

(14952)

on June 26, 2012
at 03:43 PM

Yes, and what makes Sisson or Wolf, etc more of an expert than anyone else with a college degree from a decent university? Wasn't Sisson an English major?

1edb06ded9ccf098a4517ca4a7a34ebc

(14952)

on June 26, 2012
at 03:43 PM

Yes, and what makes Sisson or Wolf, etc more of an expert than anyone else with a college degree from a decent university? Wasn't Sisson an English major? Oh, but he's ripped, so he must know what he's talking about...

1edb06ded9ccf098a4517ca4a7a34ebc

(14952)

on June 26, 2012
at 03:42 PM

Yes, and what makes Mark Sisson or Robb Wolf more of an expert than anyone else with a college degree from a decent university?

1edb06ded9ccf098a4517ca4a7a34ebc

(14952)

on June 26, 2012
at 03:34 PM

yes. .

1edb06ded9ccf098a4517ca4a7a34ebc

(14952)

on June 26, 2012
at 03:33 PM

Yes. You can't major in "nutritionism" so anyone with college level education is just as much of an expert as the so-called experts are.

1edb06ded9ccf098a4517ca4a7a34ebc

(14952)

on June 26, 2012
at 03:31 PM

Yes .

Ae8946707ddebf0f0bfbcfc63276d823

(9402)

on June 26, 2012
at 03:30 PM

I think this thread is relevant to your question: http://paleohacks.com/questions/111837/does-being-paleo-come-down-to-faith

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5 Answers

13
Fd70d71f4f8195c3a098eda4fc817d4f

(8014)

on June 26, 2012
at 03:18 PM

Sometimes it annoys me, but I think the main reason people do it is expediency.

In other words, if Robb Wolf/Mark Sisson/Kurt Harris/the WAPF/insert-your-own-hero has already done a great job of summarizing the information you would have provided in your answer, why reinvent the wheel? Why write out a 2-page missive when you can say, "So-and-so addressed this really well 6 months ago. Go check it out."

The drawback, I think, comes for people who are very new to this and can get easily overwhelmed by information. (Paralysis by analysis.) There are so many websites and sources, and someone just starting out is almost better off knowing just enough to get started, rather than missing the forest for the trees. (Which seems to happen quite often. People paralyzed by n3/n-6 ratios or whether they should peel their sweet potatoes instead of just taking the big step of cutting out processed crap.)

The newbies would probably learn more if the more "seasoned" among us would provide answers that are clear, concise, and relevant on their own, while maybe still providing links as a kind of backup or reference.

5ccb98f6ae42ce87e206cf3f6a86039f

(11581)

on June 26, 2012
at 03:48 PM

+1 for "paralysis by analysis." BIG beginner problem.

8
5ccb98f6ae42ce87e206cf3f6a86039f

(11581)

on June 26, 2012
at 03:16 PM

No, not really. I like seeing other peoples opinions and often the experts referenced will have a lot more detail and scientific references than it is practical to put in a answer here. Plus, why rewrite an excellent article/answer?

98bf2ca7f8778c79cd3f6c962011cfdc

(24286)

on June 26, 2012
at 03:46 PM

Amen! I have no problem deferring to Sisson or Wolf or any of the other leaders. They seem to know a hell of a lot more than most and definitely more than I do. Mark especially has written some fantastic pieces on a variety of subjects. He's easy to read and understand and I love pointing people in his direction.

Ce7e28769d92d5de5533e775b1de966e

on June 26, 2012
at 04:16 PM

Totally agree, yes yes!

2
1bbcd2122d9c75b07440f22ef57d6448

(2934)

on June 26, 2012
at 05:00 PM

An individual's experience is just that: their own experience. It may apply in the asker's situation, but is just as likely not to. Most bloggers and recognized paleo figures back their writing with research and hard numbers. It's still not foolproof, but these answers are a lot more likely to be relevant to the problem at hand. I'd rather have a well-researched (and publicly vetted) opinion over that of someone with questionable knowledge or experience on the topic.

1
7bf306ada57db47547e9da39a415edf6

(11214)

on June 26, 2012
at 04:57 PM

Take a listen to another blogger/expert: Jenny Ruhl. She's an 'expert' in living with diabetes, but the part of the conversation I'd like you to hear is the part where she mentions being an outlier. At this point, many of us here are outliers. We've experienced good stuff (like losing 113lbs and keeping it off for two years) but we've also experience other issues, and, unfortunately, since we are outliers, we aren't very well represented in modern research. They are going to do tons of obesity research, but practically zero research into what effect long term dieting has on your hormonal profile- well, they might, but it'll be a survey of unsuccesful female yo-yo dieters who happen to be in the age demographic most likely to spend money on whatever new product the research seems to tout.

So, very often, we are going to link to the folks who've traveled a bit further down the road. When the research papers are actually relevant and helpful that's great.

1
32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41747)

on June 26, 2012
at 03:21 PM

Everybody has their guru that they agree with most. I think it's more of a truth in advertising thing. I could answer a question with X, but I gleaned X from so-and-so, so I then instead say that "so-and-so says X." Certainly don't want to plagiarize and want to avoid the appearance of plagiarism.

That said, are answers that parrot the guru's line better than those who have synthesized their own opinion/answer? Not necessarily. I have gurus that I hold in high regard, and others that I don't consider any more knowledgeable than myself. Particularly gurus that have no relevant background on the topic at hand (i.e. they hold a degree from PubMed University or the Google Institute for Know-it-all-ism.)

So yes, it is irritating to see some folks held up as experts when they're simply just well read.

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