2

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Mental aspects of eating paleo: some questions

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created March 28, 2011 at 10:25 PM

As I have stated in a few responses to questions in this forum, I have dealt with an unhealthy relationship (obsession) with food for several years now. Things are far better for me since I was turned onto the Paleo diet, and I struggle with the issue far less now than I used to. However, I still do tend to over focus on food from time to time. I have a couple of questions I would be interested in getting feedback on.

  1. How do others in this forum deal with the daily grind of "what to eat" without it becoming obsessive (working lunches and getting the "right" meal, for example)?

  2. Perhaps related, but what is the "justification" (bad word but I cannot come up with something more accurate right now) for our choosiness in light of the fact that many in the world are less fortunate, hungry and would do just about anything for a loaf of bread and some rice?

I am fortunate. I make a good enough living that I can afford food choices that are healthier for me than others. I realize this and will continue to make choices that allow me to feel the best that I can. However, I am trying to "justify" in my head nit-picking every little recipe to make sure the correct cooking oils are used (or some other random example) when there are so many who do without every day. Thoughtful comments are much appreciated.

6426d61a13689f8f651164b10f121d64

(11478)

on March 29, 2011
at 04:14 AM

see related thread, http://paleohacks.com/questions/1354/beware-the-nocebo-effect#axzz1HxOvZcUP

77ecc37f89dbe8f783179323916bd8e6

(5002)

on March 29, 2011
at 03:38 AM

Regarding the second Q, don't forget that most people wouldn't choose to eat paleo if they could afford it. As a grad student I live near the poverty line, and eating paleo is only a slight strain on my budget. So one would have to set the bar pretty low to feel guilty about eating paleo.

072fd69647b0e765bb4b11532569f16d

(3717)

on March 29, 2011
at 01:54 AM

I do have to say that is a great line. I don't have intentions of martydom. Like I said above, the motivation for this question is really the mental challenges one might face while adopting a Paleo lifestyle. Curious how others deal with these concepts, to the extent they do.

072fd69647b0e765bb4b11532569f16d

(3717)

on March 29, 2011
at 01:52 AM

Melissa, it is certainly two questions but, to me, on a related topic - i.e. the mental difficulties potentially addressed while eating Paleo (at least my experiences).

Ed71ab1c75c6a9bd217a599db0a3e117

(25482)

on March 28, 2011
at 11:52 PM

Stressing about anything is not healthy......it shortens telomeres and lifespan.

Ed71ab1c75c6a9bd217a599db0a3e117

(25482)

on March 28, 2011
at 11:33 PM

I agree.....what others do is not material to most. It is to me because I have to treat them so I have to deal with their social an deconomic realities.....but they also have choices to make.

Ed71ab1c75c6a9bd217a599db0a3e117

(25482)

on March 28, 2011
at 11:32 PM

I help many ower socio economic patients make better choices when times are tight. I call it Paleo 0.5.

6426d61a13689f8f651164b10f121d64

(11478)

on March 28, 2011
at 11:14 PM

"The less fortunate will need us to be healthy so we can defend them against the robots when they take over."--great line!

9d43f6873107e17ca4d1a5055aa7a2ad

on March 28, 2011
at 10:43 PM

http://paleohacks.com/questions/10947/paleo-foods-for-the-economically-disadvantaged#axzz1Hvsalowe this is two questions, one about obsession, the other about food justice, can you consider making this just one question?

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6 Answers

4
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on March 28, 2011
at 10:32 PM

I've found that meal construction is really easy if I cook a few steaks at a time and a few sweet potatoes at a time, for example, and just take a steak and some potato to work in a pyrex container and then it's no big deal at all. I fry up as much meat as can fit in a pan and then freeze the excess in the case of organs that I eat slowly or else put normal meat in the fridge. I think taking advantage of economies of scale is beneficial for meal composition efficiency.

As far as the second question goes, the existence of the unfortunate should have no bearing on your personal health. Eat well and donate your time or money to a charity if you have guilt that needs to be alleviated. Martyrdom is rarely the best choice. The less fortunate will need us to be healthy so we can defend them against the robots when they take over.

6426d61a13689f8f651164b10f121d64

(11478)

on March 28, 2011
at 11:14 PM

"The less fortunate will need us to be healthy so we can defend them against the robots when they take over."--great line!

072fd69647b0e765bb4b11532569f16d

(3717)

on March 29, 2011
at 01:54 AM

I do have to say that is a great line. I don't have intentions of martydom. Like I said above, the motivation for this question is really the mental challenges one might face while adopting a Paleo lifestyle. Curious how others deal with these concepts, to the extent they do.

2
A68f24168bc0de414a038037e287b581

on March 29, 2011
at 01:22 AM

  1. We have been discussing it quite often. I do care about the "less fortunate" (I call them the victims of Northern greed). I invest in foundations like Heifer, which support poor farmers by giving them cows, chickens or water buffalo. I am interested in programs using natural ways to regrass dry areas by reintroducing cows grazing. I invest in education of the poor, as I believe education is the best way to better one's life. I also care what I eat or what my Mom eats. I do what I can to help - myself and others. I try to do conscientious decisions about my food, my carbon impact and my general consumption.

We all should do what we can, as we are all interconnected. And most of the poor pay for uncommitted crimes, being victims of the same system that makes us privileged.

1
7e746be2f0e550a8cd7df881322ae705

on March 29, 2011
at 01:08 AM

I come from a food issues background myself, former binge eater here. I still have issues sometimes and I'm not really good at "listening to my body" but I have improved a lot.

  1. I really find that cooking my breakfast/lunches for the week and bagging up snacks on the weekend makes me less "obsessive" on a daily basis. I know that I'm having egg muffins and bacon all week for breakfast and chicken thighs/butternut squash for lunch. Then I just have to worry about dinner and honestly, that choice is more often swayed by what errands I have to run and what I have time to cook.

  2. Honestly, I don't worry about what other people in the world have and don't have when I am working on my food. It's not my concern.

1
64242a1130eb51f4852f78beed38b3d5

(1343)

on March 28, 2011
at 11:47 PM

Stressing about eating isn't healthy.

Ed71ab1c75c6a9bd217a599db0a3e117

(25482)

on March 28, 2011
at 11:52 PM

Stressing about anything is not healthy......it shortens telomeres and lifespan.

6426d61a13689f8f651164b10f121d64

(11478)

on March 29, 2011
at 04:14 AM

see related thread, http://paleohacks.com/questions/1354/beware-the-nocebo-effect#axzz1HxOvZcUP

1
Ef9f83cb4e1826261a44c173f733789e

on March 28, 2011
at 10:47 PM

  1. I don't consider myself obsessed with what to eat. Planning ahead is the key to not worrying. I only worry when I forget to take something out of the freezer.

  2. To be blunt, what I do with my body isn't a collective decision. The way others live doesn't faze me and my choices. I live off of grass-fed beef, not caviar. I'm doing the rest of the world a favor by getting healthy and buying grass-fed beef.

Ed71ab1c75c6a9bd217a599db0a3e117

(25482)

on March 28, 2011
at 11:33 PM

I agree.....what others do is not material to most. It is to me because I have to treat them so I have to deal with their social an deconomic realities.....but they also have choices to make.

0
2cdd1c775683f760390d80cdb984fc13

on March 28, 2011
at 11:39 PM

  1. The "obsession" for me only comes if I'm traveling for work, which I do fairly often. I travel to some remote locations that don't have a ton of food variety and they are lucky if they even have a McDonald's or a truck stop cafe. Apps like PaleoGoGo do help on the road, and I learn to be creative with any restaurant menu.

  2. This was a hard one for me. Both of my parents are from very poor Asian countries, where rice is not only a staple, but a way of life. The way I see it, experts are calling for grain shortages in the future as the population expands, but by abstaining or reducing my grain consumption, I am helping just a little bit to free up those resources for those who need it.

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