4

votes

Has anyone here made up medical conditions to be more "socially accepted" during eating/social situations?

Answered on September 12, 2014
Created March 28, 2012 at 12:28 AM

I watch someone's children on Sundays while the mother is still home doing some writing and to get in some personal time for herself. For the first few weeks, I ate lunch with them. The mother would prepare meals and we'd all eat together family style.

She'd make foods like leftover mac and cheese, chicken nuggets or fish sticks from the freezer, pasta of some sort, sushi made with hot dogs and mayo...you get the idea. To be polite, I used to just eat the food because I felt like it would be rude to tell her, "I think the food you make is disgusting and I'm trying to be healthy...so hey, can I bring my own food?" However, this just made me feel terrible and I couldn't handle it much longer because eating those foods set me up for a binge after I left the house.

I decided in December to tell her that while visiting home that I would be seeing a doctor I had seen previously for an intestinal issue a while back when I was still in college near home because of flare-up symptoms. After the holidays, BAM, I told her about some tests that had been performed and that I needed to avoid certain foods to avoid further intestinal distress.

Then I started to bring my own food and felt much better. I was still eating with them and I also didn't resort to hurting the mom's hospitality and intended kindness.

I still stand that I didn't really MAKE IT UP or lie. It's completely true...I cannot handle that type of food and be healthy.

8508fec4bae4a580d1e1b807058fee8e

(6259)

on March 28, 2012
at 05:15 PM

I do have food intolerances, or foods that just make me feel unwell (whether immediate or delayed). I just say that it is doctor's orders. They don't know which doctor. There are Paleo doctors who make recommendations with blogs. I also am honest about saying that certain foods give me pain (which is true) and make me unwell.

1d0497f8781845ab371b479455bfee8e

(11157)

on March 28, 2012
at 02:04 PM

Unless, of course, that the person you're discussing with is, in fact, a doctor ;)

1d0497f8781845ab371b479455bfee8e

(11157)

on March 28, 2012
at 02:02 PM

There are other ways to tell people you "can't" eat a certain food, though, without having to lie. "I'm trying to limit high-GI foods", or "I'm only eating whole, unprocessed foods", or "I'm staying away from seed oils and sugary foods". So many different ways of alluding to Paleo without having to get into a terse discussion about it.

7bdfc854e5be7dd94b74dd4a39bfe1d4

(25)

on March 28, 2012
at 02:01 PM

I love what you have to say here! So, I'll just say "what he said!"

6b8d12fc3e43179f9ae1765a4d1a9dc2

(5914)

on March 28, 2012
at 06:58 AM

I wouldn't feel bad either. It is way easier than having to explain your "weird" food choices to people.

6b8d12fc3e43179f9ae1765a4d1a9dc2

(5914)

on March 28, 2012
at 06:57 AM

Suz - I totally agree that there is a huge difference between the two lies. My point is, it is still a lie, albeit one that I am sure no-one would have a problem with. My point was just in relation to you saying you didn't think it was a lie. The severity of what you are lying about has no factor on weather it is a lie or not. I lie to people all the time about food intolerances, its way easier :)

74f5d2ff6567edd456d31dfb9b92af61

(5227)

on March 28, 2012
at 03:51 AM

Very well said, Jen.

35ba1f50dad25c85ac1aa2599fe5c5cb

(2485)

on March 28, 2012
at 03:20 AM

This exactly. I have a very real illness that causes me to severely limit my sodium intake. I do paleo because it helps me maintain that. But when I eat at restaurants or other people's houses, I make a VERY CLEAR line between what I cannot eat, and what I'd just rather not eat. I think it does people with real health problems a disservice to fake illnesses, it means people don't always respect our needs. (Although it sounds like, Sunny in this case, you have a very real point... you're just being dishonest about the parameters for your own privacy, which is cool.)

65bf1ca7071028018c6d8305d0ddcd76

(3049)

on March 28, 2012
at 03:04 AM

I hear you- there are social situations which can make it hard to be forthcoming. I don't think that there is anything wrong with sharing that you need to avoid foods to avoid intestinal distress- your intentions were to be kind, and nurture/preserve your relationship. Sometimes in these situations, sharing less (and simply stating something doesn't agree with you, and you avoid it) is better. Perhaps one day the opportunity for more discussion will come up... And if not, no big deal. The important thing is that you've now created an environment where you can respect your body's needs.

78cb3c4f70de5db2adb52b6b9671894b

(5519)

on March 28, 2012
at 03:00 AM

@Blossom, yes! It does no good to make other people feel "ashamed" of how they're eating. And you're right, it's completely different if it's a family member or friend.

78cb3c4f70de5db2adb52b6b9671894b

(5519)

on March 28, 2012
at 02:59 AM

@MayaBee...exactly, I don't need extra attention drawn to how I eat. I just want to be as normal as possible in social situations as food without having people prod.

78cb3c4f70de5db2adb52b6b9671894b

(5519)

on March 28, 2012
at 02:57 AM

Well, I guess it's time to get new pants. I don't feel that bad about a twinge of truth, twisted. I'm not about to tell someone who is not a close friend the nice long history horrible relationship I have with food and I don't think people should feel obligated to

1296f5fecd084f101d7c5fbe013f07eb

(1213)

on March 28, 2012
at 02:54 AM

Some people just do not have the health education to parse gluten-paleo-intolerance-fat-evolutionary-etc. without feeling as though they've done something wrong or are being accused of something bad, and if saying "doctor said" instead of "I said" is the line between harmony and hurt feelings, then it's an acceptable fudging of the truth, I think. If it were someone closer or potentially closer to you, I think it would be different.

94a4a87e3d2e1e9160b6ed77678b4bea

(1311)

on March 28, 2012
at 02:52 AM

I think Peter's response is a little overkill... All Suz is saying is that sometimes we just want to sit down and eat and enjoy a goddam meal without having to explain and explain and explain! That can be tiring in and of itself and sometimes just sees your food going cold... :o)

78cb3c4f70de5db2adb52b6b9671894b

(5519)

on March 28, 2012
at 02:51 AM

*situation Also, I don't think it would've been appropriate to do that to her in front of her children, healthy or not. Her children are 3 and 5. When they ask me, "Miss X, why do you bring your own stuff" I don't want to say, "because I think the food your mother feeds you is unhealthy." I just don't think that's the right way to do it.

78cb3c4f70de5db2adb52b6b9671894b

(5519)

on March 28, 2012
at 02:47 AM

The condition I "claimed" really wasn't a complete lie. I also don't think having "pride" in my eating had its place in this situatsituaiton. I DO have trouble digesting food...it takes a longer time to digest high amounts of fat/fiber/protein at once due to unhealthy behaviors. Also, the food she served triggered a very real (and private)problem of bingeing. That was the core issue of my "illness" and I can't tell her, "I have a binge eating problem and whenever I eat your food, I spend the night drowning in a sea of wrappers and thinking about dying"

F4d04667059bc682540fdfd8b40f13a7

on March 28, 2012
at 02:45 AM

I think saying you have an intollerance to wheat is completely different to lying to a partner about sleeping around Peter!

78cb3c4f70de5db2adb52b6b9671894b

(5519)

on March 28, 2012
at 02:00 AM

Haha, that would've been hilarious. But I did do some research on the magical internet so that I would come across as believable.

1d0497f8781845ab371b479455bfee8e

(11157)

on March 28, 2012
at 01:54 AM

A lie is a lie. If you want to lie to strangers to avoid getting into a heated debate over food, that would be in the "white lie" category. But to lie to friends, family and loved ones for the sake of avoiding a hassle...I'd have a problem with that. Also, not the greatest way to start off a relationship by lying on a first date about why you're not eating the breadsticks and pasta...

1d0497f8781845ab371b479455bfee8e

(11157)

on March 28, 2012
at 01:52 AM

Paleoitis? And no, it's not a rash 'down there'... ;)

Ec39179d4c06199471827a706adb2896

(242)

on March 28, 2012
at 01:39 AM

I was hoping you were going to actually invent a new medical condition...

6b8d12fc3e43179f9ae1765a4d1a9dc2

(5914)

on March 28, 2012
at 01:34 AM

Really? you dont think its a lie. So if your boyfriend told you that he had been seeing a doctor for intestinal issues but really he had been sleeping with the cute girl that works at the deli, would you consider that a lie??? I think what you really mean is that you dont consider this particular lie to be too bad.

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25 Answers

best answer

14
65bf1ca7071028018c6d8305d0ddcd76

(3049)

on March 28, 2012
at 02:35 AM

I can understand why people are tempted to tell this kind of a lie, but it does cause some harm. I have celiac disease, and truly cannot tolerate any gluten. People know this about me (my family, coworkers, etc). They have learned to accept this, and know that I would never, ever itentionally ingest gluten.

I also can't have dairy and soy- now, these are intolerances, and not a disease. I still choose to never eat these items- they make me ill.

Many people have started claiming intolerances, but "cheat" publicly (and privately, no doubt). It's these seemingly harmless (to them) indulgences that cause those who don't consider their nutritional health paramount to question our motives. ('our' referring to my fellow celiacs). If I was simply paleo by choice I would say this- I think that the only people who should be ashamed of their dietary choices are those who refuse to recognize that it IS a choice, and nourishing food can be used to heal the body.

It's truly unfortunate that people feel obligated to lie instead of sharing their reality. Something is very wrong with a society that would rather accept you are different because of a disease than by choice. At the end of the day, who are these strangers- or worse, friends and family - who judge our meal choices? When did dining out become more about scrutinizing other's choices than enjoying food and company?

I can handle the silliness of being accused of avoiding gluten free to stay thin. I can graciously handle the bizarre and well intentioned (though very flawed)food gifts like whole wheat crusted pies by relatives who just don't have the information to understand celiacs, or listen to my paleo 'evangelism'. But have you ever been given a meal by a trusted friend who knew your issues and intentionally disregarded your needs because they thought "you were like her friend who avoided x ingredient, but could actually eat it and was just picky'.

please, if you are claiming an illness you don't suffer from, consider this: if your actions are selfish in nature, and your claims used to protect yourself from perceived embarassment, IT WILL NOT GET EASIER, and every time you allow yourself a 'little cheat' you are doing a disservice to those of us with real underlying medical issues. Please be proud of your choices and stop this wishy washy behavior: if it's a choice, stand proud. You owe no one an explanation. You are fortunate to be able to make that decision consciously without nature deciding for you.

--stepping off soapbox--

74f5d2ff6567edd456d31dfb9b92af61

(5227)

on March 28, 2012
at 03:51 AM

Very well said, Jen.

35ba1f50dad25c85ac1aa2599fe5c5cb

(2485)

on March 28, 2012
at 03:20 AM

This exactly. I have a very real illness that causes me to severely limit my sodium intake. I do paleo because it helps me maintain that. But when I eat at restaurants or other people's houses, I make a VERY CLEAR line between what I cannot eat, and what I'd just rather not eat. I think it does people with real health problems a disservice to fake illnesses, it means people don't always respect our needs. (Although it sounds like, Sunny in this case, you have a very real point... you're just being dishonest about the parameters for your own privacy, which is cool.)

65bf1ca7071028018c6d8305d0ddcd76

(3049)

on March 28, 2012
at 03:04 AM

I hear you- there are social situations which can make it hard to be forthcoming. I don't think that there is anything wrong with sharing that you need to avoid foods to avoid intestinal distress- your intentions were to be kind, and nurture/preserve your relationship. Sometimes in these situations, sharing less (and simply stating something doesn't agree with you, and you avoid it) is better. Perhaps one day the opportunity for more discussion will come up... And if not, no big deal. The important thing is that you've now created an environment where you can respect your body's needs.

78cb3c4f70de5db2adb52b6b9671894b

(5519)

on March 28, 2012
at 02:51 AM

*situation Also, I don't think it would've been appropriate to do that to her in front of her children, healthy or not. Her children are 3 and 5. When they ask me, "Miss X, why do you bring your own stuff" I don't want to say, "because I think the food your mother feeds you is unhealthy." I just don't think that's the right way to do it.

78cb3c4f70de5db2adb52b6b9671894b

(5519)

on March 28, 2012
at 02:47 AM

The condition I "claimed" really wasn't a complete lie. I also don't think having "pride" in my eating had its place in this situatsituaiton. I DO have trouble digesting food...it takes a longer time to digest high amounts of fat/fiber/protein at once due to unhealthy behaviors. Also, the food she served triggered a very real (and private)problem of bingeing. That was the core issue of my "illness" and I can't tell her, "I have a binge eating problem and whenever I eat your food, I spend the night drowning in a sea of wrappers and thinking about dying"

best answer

6
A7768b6c6be7f5d6acc76e5efa66464c

on March 28, 2012
at 01:06 PM

I don't lie about my reasons for eschewing certain foods, but that doesn't mean I'm always forthcoming about being "paleo" or "primal" or whatever I am. I can think of a hundred different ways to address this situation--some of which others have already suggested here--without needing to lie, nor to reveal my personal issues. Personally, I don't want the tangled web someone else suggested, whereby one sets one's self up for exposure later when one decides to try a treat meal.

"I've made some big changes to my diet, and so far it seems to really be helping. I can't say I'll never eat hot dog-mayo sushi (really??) again, but I'd really like to stick with this for awhile to see how it goes."

Later I'm spotted in a moment of weakness, judgement clouded by alcohol, ordering the hot dog-mayo sushi. "It's been months since I've had it--I thought I'd try it again to see what happens. I may never touch it again...."

Having said that, I find the lectures about lying, and particulalry this notion of the "disservice" done to people with celiac disease, et al., rather a stretch. We don't owe anyone else this supposed service. And it's not my job to use my dietary preferences in some ambassador role, nor to function as some sort of role model for healthy eating. If that's what people get from me when they see my improved health, and strange diet, great! And if they ask me, I'm all too happy to spread the word. But I don't owe them that. This isn't the same thing as Paula Deen, who lied for years about her health in order to protect a commercial enterprise, and then used that situation to further enrich herself by profitting from the sale of the drugs treating her condition.

Here, we're discussing a white lie, told in part to spare another person needless guilt or shame. This does no "disservice" to people with true celiac disease, et al.--it's not even about those people. It's between two people negotiating their lunch. The OP's white lie in no way precludes true celiacs from, upon meeting someone offering food, truthfully claiming their legitimate conditions. This seems a classic example of making a mountain of a molehill.

Philosophers and clerics will debate lies forever, but contemporary society seems to fully embrace the white lie told to avoid unnecessary and pointless pain, discomfort, or embarrassment.

"What do you think of my new jeans?" [I think they make you look like too much sausage stuffed into too small a casing.] "They're very stylish--are they Levis?"

In the OP's case, a small untruth, in a private setting, between two people for whom the basis of the untruth does not constitute a truly significant or necessary part of the relationship, seems compassionate to me. Something can be both compassionate and self-serving at the same time. I don't feel we can reasonably liken a white lie such as this to, say, marital (or romantic) infidelity. Anyone wagging that accusatory finger will have a difficult time claiming they themselves never lie.

Who among us hasn't excused ourselves from a conversation with the claim that we are busy or running late, or something similar? When we do so, do we do a disservice to truly busy people? Or do most of us agree that this lie seems preferable to saying, "I'm tired of talking to you now?"

7bdfc854e5be7dd94b74dd4a39bfe1d4

(25)

on March 28, 2012
at 02:01 PM

I love what you have to say here! So, I'll just say "what he said!"

6
F92e4ca55291c3f3096a3d4d3d854986

(11698)

on March 28, 2012
at 01:13 AM

I find there are many ways of saying it in a way that's not lying, but also doesn't seem like you're just being frivolous and picky. I have said all of these at one time or another:

I'm not really eating X these days, just doesn't agree with me; I'm trying to avoid X, I don't feel so great when I eat it; I just have a hard time digesting X; I don't seem to handle X well; X just doesn't sit well with me; I'm not so great with X; I'd prefer not to eat X, but I'm fine with A, B, C; I just don't feel well after eating X.

And usually when I say these things I gesture to my gut, so they know it's a digestive issue, not a limited palate or an eating disorder.

6
F4d04667059bc682540fdfd8b40f13a7

on March 28, 2012
at 12:55 AM

I don't think there is anything wrong with "making up" allergies or intollerances.

Sometimes you just don't want to have the whole nutrition/ Paleo conversation. Sometimes you don't want to offend people. It's not always appropriate to go into exactly what you eat and why.

I don't think it's really a lie anyway - we all fare better without this food, for all sorts of reasons - or we wouldn't be avoiding it.

94a4a87e3d2e1e9160b6ed77678b4bea

(1311)

on March 28, 2012
at 02:52 AM

I think Peter's response is a little overkill... All Suz is saying is that sometimes we just want to sit down and eat and enjoy a goddam meal without having to explain and explain and explain! That can be tiring in and of itself and sometimes just sees your food going cold... :o)

6b8d12fc3e43179f9ae1765a4d1a9dc2

(5914)

on March 28, 2012
at 06:57 AM

Suz - I totally agree that there is a huge difference between the two lies. My point is, it is still a lie, albeit one that I am sure no-one would have a problem with. My point was just in relation to you saying you didn't think it was a lie. The severity of what you are lying about has no factor on weather it is a lie or not. I lie to people all the time about food intolerances, its way easier :)

F4d04667059bc682540fdfd8b40f13a7

on March 28, 2012
at 02:45 AM

I think saying you have an intollerance to wheat is completely different to lying to a partner about sleeping around Peter!

1d0497f8781845ab371b479455bfee8e

(11157)

on March 28, 2012
at 02:02 PM

There are other ways to tell people you "can't" eat a certain food, though, without having to lie. "I'm trying to limit high-GI foods", or "I'm only eating whole, unprocessed foods", or "I'm staying away from seed oils and sugary foods". So many different ways of alluding to Paleo without having to get into a terse discussion about it.

78cb3c4f70de5db2adb52b6b9671894b

(5519)

on March 28, 2012
at 02:59 AM

@MayaBee...exactly, I don't need extra attention drawn to how I eat. I just want to be as normal as possible in social situations as food without having people prod.

6b8d12fc3e43179f9ae1765a4d1a9dc2

(5914)

on March 28, 2012
at 01:34 AM

Really? you dont think its a lie. So if your boyfriend told you that he had been seeing a doctor for intestinal issues but really he had been sleeping with the cute girl that works at the deli, would you consider that a lie??? I think what you really mean is that you dont consider this particular lie to be too bad.

1d0497f8781845ab371b479455bfee8e

(11157)

on March 28, 2012
at 01:54 AM

A lie is a lie. If you want to lie to strangers to avoid getting into a heated debate over food, that would be in the "white lie" category. But to lie to friends, family and loved ones for the sake of avoiding a hassle...I'd have a problem with that. Also, not the greatest way to start off a relationship by lying on a first date about why you're not eating the breadsticks and pasta...

5
4886d3390cb1de913ecc198e72cc072c

on March 28, 2012
at 06:39 AM

I just tell people - sorry I can't eat that - it's on my "no-no list". Then when they look at me with the usual confused look I tell them I'm on a restrictive diet for health reasons. Most don't want to pry into my health issues so I don't offer up any further info:-)

4
41d28a584639a27d63b1206220f33408

on March 28, 2012
at 06:40 AM

Whatever it is, just be straight about it. Life's too short to be going round the houses. I bet cavemen never bothered making up medical conditions.

4
4de8f1be3ed89b2b0de3463349fb1737

(964)

on March 28, 2012
at 01:45 AM

If you say "thanks but unfortunately ____ makes me sick" with a serious but nonchalant 'I've said this a million times before' kind of way, I find most folks wont prod any further. And its a totally true statement. Let them think you're either some kind of health nut of fragile creature.

Trying to explain yourself to everyone you ever share a meal with gets tiring.

3
D8f58eba263277ec6119293137b85b02

on March 28, 2012
at 01:36 AM

I was tested for celiac a few years ago and the test came back negative, but upon telling my neurologist (who has been treating me for my chronic migraines and fibromyalgia since 2008) that my symptoms had improved quite a bit upon removing all grains, he told me that I was "probably gluten sensitive", that false negatives on those tests happen, and to "keep it up". So I got a half-assed diagnosis, which I do use, but for the other stuff, which just contains crap that I don't want in my body, I give a few different politely-used explanations for why I'm refusing to eat it, all of which are usually true:
"I'm not hungry."
"I don't feel very well when I eat that."
"I heard that that exacerbates [whatever condition it pertains to] so I avoid it." (I used this recently with someone who offered me something with aspartame in it. "I've read that that can cause headaches, so I've been avoiding it just to be safe.")

It seems that just trying to be healthy is something sort of elitist and suspect in Western culture (especially as a teenager), and I've found that people don't really take me seriously if I cite preventative health as a reason. Citing the effects that a food or ingredient has given me, rather than ones I "think" they will, gets more results. So yes, I guess I stretch the truth in that I mention physiological reactions to foods with which I haven't done experiments to test how my health directly correlates with the consumption of each and every one of them, but I know that I feel better not eating them and that's enough for me.

3
2fd93e91bb14e641a2bac9c6033e84e2

(1614)

on March 28, 2012
at 01:02 AM

Yes. Kinda. I tell people I'm sensitive to gluten if they ask why I got the burger without the bun, or why I'm not picking at the stale bread basket. It's not a lie: though I've never been tested for any sort of gluten intolerance or allergy, I'm definitely sensitive to it. If people press, I make it clear I'm not allergic but that it bothers me big time so I just don't eat it.

Should you feel bad about making up your story? No way. Like you said, you can't eat that stuff and feel healthy. It's a win-win for everyone, no harm, no foul!

2
66974b2cb291799dcd661b7dec99a9e2

(11121)

on March 28, 2012
at 02:25 PM

I can understand why someone would feel the need to tell a 'white lie', esp to strangers. Personally, if people ask or comment I just tell them I don't eat crap and if they don't like it f**k 'em all. I am living proof of the Paleo Lifestyle and proud of it. I learned a long time ago that the most important opinion is my own, I am 48, 6'1", well built, my health markers are all but perfect now, have more than a few tattoos, a few piercings and shave my head - I gave up giving any thought to what small minded / narrow minded people think lol.

2
5f6acaa2591c41cc091fffd6e453c518

on March 28, 2012
at 07:39 AM

To avoid myself explaining paleo to some S.A.D person who doesn't give two s** ( and if the person isn't close to me). I just tell them i'm Celiac or I have blood sugar issues, so therefore I avoid sugar and grains. 90% of them don't know what celiac or 'blood sugar issues' is really about. So they just smile and nod.

2
B2cadbf43bddfbb523b8a53155656188

on March 28, 2012
at 01:31 AM

I do it all the time! I think people react better to "I'm sensitive to gluten" versus "I'm on a paleo diet". Although, like others have mentioned, stating that you have a sensitivity or intolerance to certain foods isn't necessarily a flat out lie.

1
F3920b85be76a5d8cf466d805bfb99e4

(638)

on April 01, 2012
at 05:00 PM

lol, I was just at a party yesterday... lots of bread dips, crackers, cake. There was a smattering of meat, cheese and fresh fruit to so it wasn't completely hopeless. Another guest seemed persistent to offer me the wrong foods so I just told him it was poison. Evil. To which he replied, "everything in balance". I asked him if he wanted a little arsenic sprinkled on his "all things in moderation" paradigm? I probably didn't earn any social points with that one, but I'm tired of societal pressure to eat in a way that I know creates havoc in the body. Whether it's coming through subsidizing certain industries or the subtle insistence of an acquaintance.

1
Cbda678b2a6bf0537d8c4ea0ce8aa9ad

(4319)

on April 01, 2012
at 04:29 PM

I lie, I will find myself saying: "I'm on a very strict diet", as if imposed by external conditions. As a Type II diabetic, I guess I have the back-up argument.

1
C0fcb48d7da4f76fac17318efd2cd6b8

on April 01, 2012
at 02:56 PM

I just say, "not comin' unless there's meat." Seems to work OK.

1
B0fe7b5a9a197cd293978150cbd9055f

(8938)

on April 01, 2012
at 09:00 AM

All the time! I'd rather lie than feel like crap. Besides, I get shy when I eat bad. Binge eating is not a problem, it's my personality. I really change when I eat bad food. I get moody, shy, narcissistic and boring. Or I lie about food issues (though technically I really don't tolerate bread etc.), or I turn into an autistic and depressed mofo. I think the first solution is better for everybody.

At the moment, I am histamine intolerant, gluten intolerant, have an allergy to plastic (this one is hard to make credible), have liver issues and my doctor told me I can't drink alcohol, have thyroid issues, oh and I also am autistic (probably not a lie, but I was never diagnosed with it). This covers practically everything.

1
8e10b687e328468783a72c55b64710e8

on April 01, 2012
at 08:40 AM

I tell people I get sick when I eat certain foods, but once in a while I go out and eat with them (if the food is free). I resist first but tell them that I will just deal with the consequence because it's "only once". I do get sick at the end though. I don't think most people take me seriously because they give me a funny look. I wasn't rushed to the hospital or anything when I eat vegetable oils or gluten, and after all the food I eat with them is "natural" and "healthy" because it's low fat, cooked only with vegetable oil, no sat. fat, or something. But they do respect my decision and try to act accordingly, and I feel guilty.

I don't claim gluten intolerance though, because most people picture that as someone having to get rushed to the hospital from gluten consumption, and people eventually begin doubting my "gluten sensitivity" and view me more as a health nut who is merely nitpicky every time I do eat gluten products and not die from it.

1
1ab7ccb9520dddd0777db88e74ca0bed

on March 28, 2012
at 01:02 PM

I just tell them I'm trying to lose weight. Unfortunately they believe me, and since I'm 5'11" 135lbs, they think I'm anorexic. Oops.

1
27bac964edd249667d0fb749daeeb090

(263)

on March 28, 2012
at 07:54 AM

Haha.. I do the exact opposite!

I don't always tell people I'm a type 1 diabetic because they will say "oh, you poor thing, you have to eat this way because of diabetes".

Noooo... I eat this way first because it's healthy, and as a bonus it makes my diabetic life very easy!

1
Ff1dbd6cecad1e69a8234fb2c2c5c5ed

(1409)

on March 28, 2012
at 06:18 AM

Whenever I find it necessary to offer any explanation at all, I develop instant diabetes. This is easily understood and saves me from grains and sugar. I find it impossible to escape the O6 in a restaurant and just live with it when I eat out.

While the excuse of a food allergy may work in the US and also certain parts of Europe, this concept simply doesn't exist in countries like France or Italy.

1
F80aaa96354eb749a8a5efdda3feba7d

on March 28, 2012
at 02:04 AM

I just say I'm intolerant to said food. Mainly just gluten is the biggest. But when I'm out at a restaurant I say I'm allergic and three settles any picky eater issue I've received in the past. It's hard cause It's not a lie. Will I go into anaphalactic shock? No. Will I feel terrible after? Yes. Thus I'm intolerant. :)

1
6b8d12fc3e43179f9ae1765a4d1a9dc2

(5914)

on March 28, 2012
at 01:31 AM

..."I didn't really MAKE IT UP or lie. It's completely true"... So you saw a doctor and he told you to avoid certain foods??? Otherwise it IS A LIE. And your a liar, and your pants are well and truly on fire. No getting around it.

But who cares? At least you dont have to eat the crappy food any more.

6b8d12fc3e43179f9ae1765a4d1a9dc2

(5914)

on March 28, 2012
at 06:58 AM

I wouldn't feel bad either. It is way easier than having to explain your "weird" food choices to people.

78cb3c4f70de5db2adb52b6b9671894b

(5519)

on March 28, 2012
at 02:57 AM

Well, I guess it's time to get new pants. I don't feel that bad about a twinge of truth, twisted. I'm not about to tell someone who is not a close friend the nice long history horrible relationship I have with food and I don't think people should feel obligated to

1
C4f1a0c70c4e0dea507c2e346c036bbd

on March 28, 2012
at 01:12 AM

All the time. I like freaking out people with wild sounding paleo supporting diseases. LIke celiac, prediabetes, and allergic to whatever I don't want to eat.

1
96bf58d8c6bd492dc5b8ae46203fe247

(37227)

on March 28, 2012
at 12:34 AM

Unfortunately, I don't have to. It's really true that refined products with lots of additives make me sick. There are days when I wish it were a lie, but it isn't.

So I just smile and go for the closest-to-whole foods. If it's been a long time since I splurged, I may get away with a small quantity of SAD stuff, but overall I'm better off not eating if there are no whole-food options.

My circle of family and friends is small enough that I don't have to make many compromises, since they all know I'm a "tender flower" and they're used to my odd ways. They've all seen me start sneezing if someone's wearing scent or smoking, too, which we all find hilarious since cats and dogs can climb all over me and I'm fine.

0
E8dd83fe24a0879d8b16ab4ca92b72dd

(1307)

on July 05, 2012
at 09:36 AM

On one hand, I see lying as a completely invalid way of socially promoting evolutionary medicine. Trying to fit your dietary choices into the disease paradigm is exactly what Big Pharma and Big Agra want. Rather than saying, I don't eat "X" because it makes me feel terrible, you have to fit yourself into whatever circle they designate for you. Quite the vicious cycle if you think about it.

Also, it's pretty useless lying about intolerances, sensitivities, allergies, ect. Why? Because most people are f*cking ignorant as hell when it comes to diets of any kind. And, as in the case with most people nowadays, they've no interest to relearn or adapt to anything that inconveniences them, and trust me, your dietary choices--when not paralleling their own--irritate them. I can't tell you how many people have offered me a sandwich, to which I said, "I can't have bread..." and they irritatingly replied, "So? Take everything off the bread..."

Then you launch into the subject of cross-contamination and...if you're an atheist and you've ever wondered what your face looks like when someone tells you they believe in something that can't be proven? There you go. You're now looking into a mirror.

While I don't see the point in lying, I do not blame people for being blunt and short with their explanations. I even agree with a little hyperbole here and there.

"I don't eat bread."

"Really? Why?"

"Because the last time I did, I destroyed my friend's toilet. There was nothing but a steaming hole in the ground."

Their face O.o

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