5

votes

Fincancial crisis and your paleo life?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created November 07, 2011 at 9:15 PM

The world has got its problems. Finances and economies are in trouble. But the word crisis can also mean: 'opening to the future'. An opportunity...

Have these financial troubles changed your paleo lifestyle? Changed your priorities? Changed your world view paleo-wise?

Although I'm not directly hit by the crisis, it has influenced me:

  • more detachment from things

  • more attachment to persons, time and the natural world (all of these are free)

For the above I also needed:

  • more 'je m'en foutisme' about what others think of me and my choices

Your thoughts? Thanks

6426d61a13689f8f651164b10f121d64

(11478)

on November 08, 2011
at 01:52 AM

@Huey, "peak oil" is a myth. Nation-states control most of the world's energy supplies, which they constrain to support prices and control their citizens. Debt, not energy, was the Faustian bargain of modern civilization. The question is whether the unwinding of this debt will be cyclical, as @Marie contends, or climactic, bringing to a close the era of the nation-state. You may be right about Fred Flintstone, but it's not due to peak oil.

96bf58d8c6bd492dc5b8ae46203fe247

(37227)

on November 07, 2011
at 09:19 PM

"... it has influenced me: more detachment from things; more attachment to persons, time and the natural world (all of these are free)" You said it for me!

96bf58d8c6bd492dc5b8ae46203fe247

(37227)

on November 07, 2011
at 09:18 PM

"Although I'm not directly hit by the crisis, it has influenced me: more detachment from things; more attachment to persons, time and the natural world (all of these are free)" You said it for me!

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5 Answers

2
Medium avatar

(4878)

on November 07, 2011
at 10:39 PM

If you want to see how this downward economic cycle (which occurs every ~80 years) will play out, I strongly recommend the book "The Fourth Turning". I teach Business Trend Analysis and use many of these generational theories to explain why we do what we do. I read this in '97 (when I was working in Corp America) and am now seeing many of their forecast's come true. From the economic crisis to the younger generation's desire for 'social networking' (aka community), smaller homes, and religion it is a fascinating read.

The Fourth Turning: a theory of generations, economics, and life's priorities.

0
1d0497f8781845ab371b479455bfee8e

(11157)

on November 08, 2011
at 03:12 AM

I try not to worry about the future (and state of the world) so much. It'll drive you crazy, and there is only so much one person can do. As long as I've got my man and my animals, the world can go to hell for all I care ;)

0
Aa69579f867333b08158c70e25f7daf1

(1826)

on November 08, 2011
at 01:49 AM

I think, unfortunately, that instead of turning to simplicity and local foods and simple lifestyle changes, many people have looked to solutions like "extreme couponing" or silly work at home gimmicks.

Instead of looking at consumption and reducing, I feel too many people have looked for ways to continue to consume at ridiculous levels for cheaper. And I think this is at odds with the paleo lifestyle: many of us choose to eat less, but eat higher quality foods. We choose to drive less, take fewer vacations, live in a smaller house, have fewer things - all because we want to live more simply and because we want to devote our resources carefully to things we honestly believe matter.

I'm not against couponing; on the contrary, I use online databases to get my toothbrushes and my hand soap for free with stacking deals. But I do think that the economic instability in the world today has spurred, in too many cases, the wrong kind of movement.

0
6229cd9a7ca9882590259fae022e2647

(3209)

on November 07, 2011
at 09:40 PM

Strangely I'm unlike most people; I'm doing the best financially than I ever have.

However, I've come to realize that my time is more valuable than more money since I have an hour commute to work versus 10 min at my old job.

I certainly don't care about labels anymore and I rarely even wear makeup anymore.

I've also come to realize a larger house is not going to make me feel more at home.

I need to live in the present instead of making my life one long string of goals.

-2
93ae9f2d376e5426e891a9b58d8302fa

(2936)

on November 08, 2011
at 01:20 AM

Boy do I disagree with Marie. This is NOT cyclical. This is THE turning point, the peak of fossil fuel consumtion, the apex of Faustian civilization. It's all downhill from here (with some upticks, to be sure, but the moving average is all down). Conventional oil production peaked in '06. Thats the big enchilada. All yer unconventional crap, tar sands and shale oil and ultra-deepwater, those are dregs, when you consider the ratio of energy-in to energy-out required to produce them.

Forget the George Jetson future. Say hi to Fred Flintstone.

6426d61a13689f8f651164b10f121d64

(11478)

on November 08, 2011
at 01:52 AM

@Huey, "peak oil" is a myth. Nation-states control most of the world's energy supplies, which they constrain to support prices and control their citizens. Debt, not energy, was the Faustian bargain of modern civilization. The question is whether the unwinding of this debt will be cyclical, as @Marie contends, or climactic, bringing to a close the era of the nation-state. You may be right about Fred Flintstone, but it's not due to peak oil.

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