5

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What does your paleo kid's diet look like?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created August 15, 2011 at 12:45 PM

Just curious what other paleo parents out there are feeding their kids. It can be hard when you're the only one in your playgroup not letting your kid slurp baby "fruit" "food" out of a foil pouch. Would like some reassurance that we're on the right track. What does a typical day look like for your kid(s)?

My son is 18 months and here's his: 12 oz of bone broth with 1/2 tsp fermented cod liver oil mixed in when he wakes up Breakast: 2 pasture eggs scrambled in tallow with 1/4 cup spinach (or other green veggie) Snack: (if he needs one, he usually doesn't) more bone broth, steamed carrot sticks Lunch: Couple ounces of grass-fed beef (or salmon or sardines), veggies Snack: Lately it's been cucumbers and a couple ounces of raw grass-fed cheese, more bone broth Dinner: sometimes he's not hungry for dinner, but I always offer some protein and a couple different veggies I do try to keep his fruit intake to a minimum, but the child is a blueberry fiend and can go through an entire pint as a snack (and I let him sometimes). He usually has a couple spoonfuls of home-fermented kimchi or relish at each meal as well.

510bdda8988ed0d4b0ec0b738b4edb73

(20898)

on November 20, 2012
at 04:49 PM

It's easy - we just don't do dairy. He eats what we eat and drinks water, which is pretty much what we do too. There's nothing magic about dairy.

6120c989fd5b69f42a0834b69b87955b

(24553)

on November 20, 2012
at 10:37 AM

I've actually found those pouches of pureed organic fruit to be a godsend. There is one that is a mix of pumpkin, applesauce, and cranberries that we order by the case. They make amazing car snacks for grumpy/thirsty/hungry toddlers during that witching hour between the park/afternoon activities and dinner time (as long as they learn to hold it from the top). As far as I can tell there is no reason to fear feeding kids fruit or starch, as long as that is not ALL they are eating. They are growing so freakin' fast that they are in a constant state of being able to use a carb refeed.

19acef0aed67ef8dc1118d8e74edb349

(2954)

on June 19, 2012
at 11:16 AM

Maybe you could cook the veggies in 2 tablespoons butter and a pinch of salt instead of steaming them, if he eats pears and apples they can also be pan fried with generous amount of butter, add a pinch of cinnamon at the table.

19acef0aed67ef8dc1118d8e74edb349

(2954)

on June 19, 2012
at 11:12 AM

^ piza and beer

19acef0aed67ef8dc1118d8e74edb349

(2954)

on June 19, 2012
at 11:11 AM

You didn't mention if you still breast feed him, so you need to add a lot more saturated fat to his diet if you don't. Not just for now but until he's done growing in his late teens. At that point forget diet, he'll probably just eat pizza and be :-P

19acef0aed67ef8dc1118d8e74edb349

(2954)

on June 19, 2012
at 11:09 AM

Looks great, only thing I would add is a lot more animal fat. Growing children need lots of saturated fat and his diet looks a bit too lean.

306aa57660d911781231f8090c2a5619

(3808)

on August 16, 2011
at 07:50 PM

Don't be sure that breastfeeding isn't enough! It's very common for breastfed babies to grow faster during the first few months, then slow down. Formula-fed babies tend to have a more steady, linear growth pattern. That's the "norm" on which many growth charts are based, but not necessarily what is natural and right. Google for "breastfed baby growth chart" and see how she's doing according to that. Also, don't feel you have to start with purees. Give her chunks of soft food like banana, avocado, steamed carrots, or squash and see what she does. She'll figure it out eventually on her own!

776bb678d88f7194b0fa0e5146df14f0

(1069)

on August 16, 2011
at 01:58 AM

I'll never understand why schools serve such abysmal food. It's not healthy by *anyone's* standards. And if cost is an issue, it would probably still be healthier and cheaper to feed kids something like what poor Indians or Mexicans eat - lentils and rice, or corn and beans, with salad on the side. I just don't get what the impetus is for our government overlords to feed our kids crap to destroy their bodies and minds. It seems almost like a purposefully evil plot.

D30ff86ad2c1f3b43b99aed213bcf461

on August 15, 2011
at 07:53 PM

What I would really love is for Laptop Lunches to develop a silicone set compatible with their original cases. akd, really interesting - I saw these cute backpacks with matching lunchbox cases that clip onto the backpack in two places - at WalMart. The lunchbox cases were suspiciously the same size/shape/insulated design that the LL cases are. You could buy the interior box and plastic compartments without shelling out for the full set (= with the carrying case) and then have it compatible with this WalMart backpack/lunchbox case set, looks like!

C2450eb7fa11b37473599caf93b461ef

(3225)

on August 15, 2011
at 07:36 PM

Just splurged on a PlanetBox for my daughter and I'm so excited to pack lunches in it! (Gasp, did I actually say that?) She loves the magnets... fairies, unicorns, and dolphins, a 6 year old's dream. We had Laptop Lunch but I wasn't a fan. The lids were tricky to me, and difficult to clean.

04e3b66d5b3ca0aad698f0ea7f88f820

on August 15, 2011
at 07:06 PM

I've got a few posts about school lunches up on my blog http://theprimalparent.com/2011/08/14/school-lunches-part-2/ http://theprimalparent.com/2011/08/07/school-lunches-part-1/ And a whole lot of talk about getting kids kids to go along with this, like this one: http://theprimalparent.com/2011/06/21/paleo-kids-combating-outside-influences/

Medium avatar

(12379)

on August 15, 2011
at 05:56 PM

no - apparenly it's the other way around - when we pick him up, the other parents are always asking what we pack for him especially on the days that we pack sausage and or bacon in his lunch, the other kids drool - I also bought a bento box on ebay so our lunches look pretty cool too.

2c8c421cf0e0c462654c7dc37f8b9711

(2729)

on August 15, 2011
at 05:51 PM

Love it, Bree! Sounds great! Do you have any trouble with him trying to eat other kids' food at daycare?

2c8c421cf0e0c462654c7dc37f8b9711

(2729)

on August 15, 2011
at 05:48 PM

@Bree- see above. Warmed on the stove, in a sippy cup. Looking into glass sippy cups cause I hate putting hot liquids in the plastic ones, but he isn't dextrous enough to handle a glass yet.

Ed983a42344945b1ff70fd9597a23493

on August 15, 2011
at 04:59 PM

Beautiful...lucky guy!

Medium avatar

(12379)

on August 15, 2011
at 03:04 PM

Lizzish - how do you give the bone broth? sippy cup or bottle, warm or cold? Thanks!

Aead76beb5fc7b762a6b4ddc234f6051

(15239)

on August 15, 2011
at 02:22 PM

ooooo! so many awesome choices! thanks you guys! my daughter picked out her first ever lunchbox the other at target and they didnt have any storage for inside the box. i ordered some temporary plastic bento boxes on amazon for cheap until i found a better, affordable replacement. theres some cute ones on reusablebags.com but so expensive with all the accessories and shes just in preschool...

D30ff86ad2c1f3b43b99aed213bcf461

on August 15, 2011
at 02:04 PM

See this post: http://primalkitchen.blogspot.com/2010/08/launch-of-lunchbox-adventures.html They're via Laptop Lunches. Since my daughter's lunches are always chilled (no heating facilities/capability at her preschool), I'm OK with the plastic containers that are free of phthalates, bisphenol A (BPA), or lead. (Also American-made.) I'm not a Laptop Lunches shill, but save for the plastic bottle in the set, whose lid leaked after a year of use (and was inexpensive to replace at about $3), the set's advantages have worked enough for me to likely eventually buy one for my younger daughter, too.

07ca188c8dac3a17f629dd87198d2098

(7970)

on August 15, 2011
at 02:02 PM

akd: Oh, and here are some more I had considered: http://www.laptoplunches.com/ Still up in the air between these two, I think.

07ca188c8dac3a17f629dd87198d2098

(7970)

on August 15, 2011
at 02:00 PM

akd: I can't answer your question specifically, but I've had my eyes on these for a while: http://www.planetbox.com/ - as soon as my kids are of lunch-packing-for-school age, I intend to convince my wife to order these.

2c8c421cf0e0c462654c7dc37f8b9711

(2729)

on August 15, 2011
at 01:45 PM

@wonko- I warm the broth up on the stove and give it to him in a sippy cup. @Katherine- we do eat organ meats several times a week but you're right about the starches. I'm trying to lean out so I haven't been making sweet potatoes for myself, but he probably needs them. I am trying to cut down on his snacking because it seems like he does it more out of habit than real hunger.

Aead76beb5fc7b762a6b4ddc234f6051

(15239)

on August 15, 2011
at 01:35 PM

im printing these pictures all out and wallpapering my kitchen with them before school starts. btw, i never asked you where you got your bento boxes?

Eecc48184707bc26bce631485b5b7e34

(4764)

on August 15, 2011
at 01:30 PM

I'd also consider omitting the snacks...but that's just me. I now have two kids who think they need to eat continuously. Is he still nursing? An oyster or two (or three:)) once a week would be a great addition for the zinc. Looks great!

Eecc48184707bc26bce631485b5b7e34

(4764)

on August 15, 2011
at 01:27 PM

I would add some starches and organ meats (sweetbreads and liver each once a week). I'd probably be looking at starches like sweet potato, yam, potato, taro, plantain - cooked, peeled etc. Even banana in moderation. I don't think fruit is a problem once or twice a day.

C678bf33580271beecf36ab23424c3bb

(100)

on August 15, 2011
at 01:23 PM

Can you come and cater for my 4-year-old? :-) How do you serve the bone broth? Hot/warm? In a bottle, with a spoon? My son has Asperger's and we're trying to slowly shift to a more Paleo diet, but he's very fussy. We're taking baby steps, but it's hard going.

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12 Answers

8
D30ff86ad2c1f3b43b99aed213bcf461

on August 15, 2011
at 01:29 PM

We're lactopaleo, with a 4.5 year old and a nursing 20 month old, eating a wide variety these days, including seasonal summer fruit.

For a decent idea of what's in regular rotation, check out the ~110 (and growing) posts where I show pictures and descriptions of my preschooler's (and some of my husband's) packed lunches.

Otherwise, typical day for us:

  • Breakfast (any of the following) - Fruit, plain organic whole fat yoghurt (maybe with a touch of raw honey), eggs cooked in pastured butter, leftover animal protein from the night before

  • Lunch (if at home, any of the following) - Leftover animal protein from the night before, fresh veggie crudites (carrot sticks, cherry tomatoes, sliced peppers, etc.), avocado, fresh fruit, soup using leftover proteins and bone broth, hard cheese, nuts, liverwurst cold from the fridge, sweet potatoes or regular potatoes

  • Dinner (any of the following) - Grilling a lot of meat these days, add some fresh or sauteed veggies (w/healthy fat like coconut oil or pastured butter, of course), crock pot slow cooked meat and veggies, curries with fish and veggies and coconut milk), oven-roasted chicken, breakfast for dinner via bacon and eggs, sweet potatoes or regular potatoes

D30ff86ad2c1f3b43b99aed213bcf461

on August 15, 2011
at 02:04 PM

See this post: http://primalkitchen.blogspot.com/2010/08/launch-of-lunchbox-adventures.html They're via Laptop Lunches. Since my daughter's lunches are always chilled (no heating facilities/capability at her preschool), I'm OK with the plastic containers that are free of phthalates, bisphenol A (BPA), or lead. (Also American-made.) I'm not a Laptop Lunches shill, but save for the plastic bottle in the set, whose lid leaked after a year of use (and was inexpensive to replace at about $3), the set's advantages have worked enough for me to likely eventually buy one for my younger daughter, too.

Aead76beb5fc7b762a6b4ddc234f6051

(15239)

on August 15, 2011
at 02:22 PM

ooooo! so many awesome choices! thanks you guys! my daughter picked out her first ever lunchbox the other at target and they didnt have any storage for inside the box. i ordered some temporary plastic bento boxes on amazon for cheap until i found a better, affordable replacement. theres some cute ones on reusablebags.com but so expensive with all the accessories and shes just in preschool...

Aead76beb5fc7b762a6b4ddc234f6051

(15239)

on August 15, 2011
at 01:35 PM

im printing these pictures all out and wallpapering my kitchen with them before school starts. btw, i never asked you where you got your bento boxes?

C2450eb7fa11b37473599caf93b461ef

(3225)

on August 15, 2011
at 07:36 PM

Just splurged on a PlanetBox for my daughter and I'm so excited to pack lunches in it! (Gasp, did I actually say that?) She loves the magnets... fairies, unicorns, and dolphins, a 6 year old's dream. We had Laptop Lunch but I wasn't a fan. The lids were tricky to me, and difficult to clean.

07ca188c8dac3a17f629dd87198d2098

(7970)

on August 15, 2011
at 02:02 PM

akd: Oh, and here are some more I had considered: http://www.laptoplunches.com/ Still up in the air between these two, I think.

D30ff86ad2c1f3b43b99aed213bcf461

on August 15, 2011
at 07:53 PM

What I would really love is for Laptop Lunches to develop a silicone set compatible with their original cases. akd, really interesting - I saw these cute backpacks with matching lunchbox cases that clip onto the backpack in two places - at WalMart. The lunchbox cases were suspiciously the same size/shape/insulated design that the LL cases are. You could buy the interior box and plastic compartments without shelling out for the full set (= with the carrying case) and then have it compatible with this WalMart backpack/lunchbox case set, looks like!

07ca188c8dac3a17f629dd87198d2098

(7970)

on August 15, 2011
at 02:00 PM

akd: I can't answer your question specifically, but I've had my eyes on these for a while: http://www.planetbox.com/ - as soon as my kids are of lunch-packing-for-school age, I intend to convince my wife to order these.

3
Medium avatar

(12379)

on August 15, 2011
at 03:11 PM

Breakfast - 2 eggs (whichever style we are eating that morning) a piece of bacon and a sausage or a pice of ham and a half teaspoon of fish oil.

We pack his lunch for daycare which usually consists of meat from last nights dinner (chicken, steak, salmon, halibut or the like) 4 florets of steamed broccoli, 3-4 mini steamed carrots, 1/2 cup organic greek-style high fat yogurt, 2 homemade preserved apricots, a homemade pickle, a container of fresh berries, 3-4 cherry tomatoes, an apple, and he usually drinks 2 bottles of milk at daycare.

Dinner - kale or chard, broccoli or some other veggie, once or twice a week I'll make homemade yam fries for him, and then the meat dish. The kid can pack away half a steak or half a chicken breast easily or a whole serving of salmon. Then generally he'll want some more berries or watermelon (Lately I've made homemade popsicles by blending fresh berries and over-ripe watermelon and then freezing it- he loves them). Then another bottle.

Holy man that kid can eat a lot for a 2 year old!!!

2c8c421cf0e0c462654c7dc37f8b9711

(2729)

on August 15, 2011
at 05:51 PM

Love it, Bree! Sounds great! Do you have any trouble with him trying to eat other kids' food at daycare?

Medium avatar

(12379)

on August 15, 2011
at 05:56 PM

no - apparenly it's the other way around - when we pick him up, the other parents are always asking what we pack for him especially on the days that we pack sausage and or bacon in his lunch, the other kids drool - I also bought a bento box on ebay so our lunches look pretty cool too.

2
5234aa58c906eaed4d2614634cc77773

on August 15, 2011
at 01:33 PM

We just switched to paleo style a couple weeks ago. My daughter literally cried her eyes out when she realized that meant no more biscuits and gravy. Of course, 2 minutes later she was talking about how it could be cool to try new things...

Anyway, the kids pretty much eat whatever we eat. I have an 8 yo, 5 yo and 11 mo. I'm still nursing the baby so she just eats bits of whatever we're having.

A day for the kids looks like a paleo muffin/carrot w almond butter/eggs/bacon for breakfast (not all together, these are just some of their faves), leftovers from dinner/turkey rollups for lunch with a fruit and veg, and then whatever we're having for dinner.

Your menu looks awesome for the baby! :) So far, I haven't been super strict with the kids' diets outside the home. We've had a few opportunities to connect non-paleo food consumption with total meltdowns, which is helping to show the kids what kind of effect their food choices make on their moods/behavior/fun time. I like to leave the choice in their hands when they are elsewhere so they can weigh their options instead of just rebelling against whatever I say ;).

2
41e79168f1df5d656b6c4f3fef8c9b46

(630)

on August 15, 2011
at 01:18 PM

Wow that is awesome and I hope I can try this when I have children. I'm so tired of hearing people say, how can you deprive your child from hotdogs and snacks. Gross! If that's deprivation hen my child will be eating like a king' lol

1
44894358c1cd33674c22850cc9368959

on November 20, 2012
at 06:41 AM

Hmm. You basically have your child on an Atkins induction style diet. Please feed your child some starch asap.

1
Ce41c230e8c2a4295db31aec3ef4b2ab

(32556)

on August 15, 2011
at 01:39 PM

Peggy the Primal Parent has a great blog you may want to check out: http://theprimalparent.com/

She has a series of posts on kids food and a new forum.

0
510bdda8988ed0d4b0ec0b738b4edb73

(20898)

on November 20, 2012
at 04:47 PM

We don't over think it at all. Our 15 mo. old eats what we eat, and that's it. He gets eggs, bacon, and advocado for breakfast. Lunch is leftover meat from dinner, usually with squash or some other startchy food that we have. And dinner is just whatever meat and veggies we're having. Simple and easy. No need for snacks or anything, he doesn't get the crazy freak-out sugar crashes that other kids get, so we don't need to appease him. The only thing that's hard is that if he's starting to get fussy, you can just be like other parents and pull a cracker out of a box and give it to him, you actually need to prepare real food. But that's a small price to pay for health.

0
193b7fb0fec8913d5ebb3b99a04d21c6

(2918)

on November 20, 2012
at 02:53 PM

I let my kids eat grass fed butter and cheese, but not straight milk or anything like that.

Breakfast: Sausage or bacon and eggs. Usually almond milk to go with.

Lunch: Cold cuts wrapped around cheese, or just plain. A handful of nuts, some raw fruit and/or veggies. A small piece of dark chocolate.

Dinner: Protein and veggies. Usually a meat and a vegetable. My son generally gravitates toward the meats and my daughter gravitates toward the veggies. Sometimes they eat white rice with dinner.

That's a general day. My son is 6 and my daughter is 4. They both pretty much eat everything, so the menu varies. We might order a sausage crust pizza. We might make spaghetti squash pasta. I might make Paleo cupcakes. All depends on the day, but that's my "zero creativity 3 square meals" plan.

0
5766d5b19bbc2e82d8161a266e1ac018

on June 19, 2012
at 08:42 AM

I'd love to know what other people who don't have dairy do!

Here is what my 13 month old ate today, which is reasonably indicative.

Breakfast: Breastfeed then green smoothie (beet leaves, mango, mandarin, fish oil and kefir water) sweet potato hash with onion, parsley and wild salmon

alt="temp_alt"

Morning Tea: kabanosy sausage, grapes, coconut balls

BF

Lunch: Mackeral, vegetables bucksheat bread with misomite

BF

BF

Dinner: liver, beans, carrots and beets

BF

He is demand breastfed, I offer 3 a day, morning lunch and night, and he varies whether he asks for more. Today he did a lot!

I haven't made bone broth in a while, should get on to that!

510bdda8988ed0d4b0ec0b738b4edb73

(20898)

on November 20, 2012
at 04:49 PM

It's easy - we just don't do dairy. He eats what we eat and drinks water, which is pretty much what we do too. There's nothing magic about dairy.

0
F3e312545761ab663e37e6c2d5c831ea

(1049)

on August 16, 2011
at 06:30 PM

I couldn't possibly list what my kids ate here, since they eat what we eat. Our 15mo baby, 3 1/2 yo and 6yo all eat everything (with a few small exceptions, as we all have).

Their favorites are meat with crispy skin and on the bones, soups, stews, lettuce wraps, things they can dip and anything that looks like, tastes like or has the name of anything in the standard american diet (put a "chip" at the end of the vegetables you're serving and they become magic to a toddler).

You can see more ideas at these posts too:

http://paleoparents.com/start-here-paleo-parents-101/faq/

http://paleoparents.com/2011/no-really-what-do-your-kids-eat/

http://paleoparents.com/2011/breakfast-for-dinner-thursday-v2/

http://paleoparents.com/2011/toddler-training-inspired-by-heather/

Most importantly, just relax and enjoy food with your kids. Teach them it nourishes their bodies and helps build muscle, a strong brain and sharp eyes but can be quite delicious and fun too:)

Stacy & Matt

0
4e35234c4ac63dfc0bb69c71ca9b431f

(15)

on August 15, 2011
at 08:06 PM

I have a 6 MO and have just started feeding her solids about two weeks ago. (Am still nursing and will continued to do so until she's at least 18 months.) She has a cold and is recovering from an ear infection (my 3 YO goes to preschool and brings home lots of bugs) and her appetite is limited, but I started her on Earth's Best and Happy Baby foods. She eats those easily.

Then I spent a weekend making her homemade baby foods of pureed squash, sweet potato, green beans, avocado, banana, etc and mixed them with bone broth. I made them as smooth as possible and even pushed them through a sieve, but she hates them. The face she makes when I put the food in her mouth is hysterical, but also frustrating. I have tried not using broth and just using water to puree the food, but the result is the same. I am thinking it's the texture. I just can't compete with the industrial blenders.

I suppose I could just keep offering it until she's hungry enough to eat it, but she's on antibiotics and is not supposed to take the medicine on an empty stomach. Also, her weight gain has slowed way down since month 4, so I know breast milk alone can't sustain her. Any suggestions?

My 3 YO, on the other hand, eats pretty much whatever I put in front of her and always has. She eats "clean" at home, eggs and bacon with avocado or tomatoes for breakfast, a snack of nuts after school, sometimes mixed with real, plain Greek yogurt. Dinner is grass-fed meat with a side of veggies cooked in lard or bacon fat. I'll maker her real fruit popsicles, chocolate mousse with coconut cream and dark, dark chocolate, for the occasional treat. She eats an insane amount, but is also a very active 3 YO with surprising muscle definition.

I haven't yet packed her lunches for preschool. What they serve is pretty abysmal: corn dogs, pizza, French fries, macaroni and cheese, etc. all with a serving of salad or baby carrots on the side. Luckily, they no longer offer juice, just milk or water, but snacks are usually cookies, pretzels, or crackers. Desserts are sometimes seasonal fruits, sometimes popsicles or jello.

I can't decide whether to go that extra step to pack a lunch for her or whether to settle for the fact that since she gets the majority of her meals from home, eating the SAD 1.5 times a day, 5 days a week won't hurt her. What do you guys think?

776bb678d88f7194b0fa0e5146df14f0

(1069)

on August 16, 2011
at 01:58 AM

I'll never understand why schools serve such abysmal food. It's not healthy by *anyone's* standards. And if cost is an issue, it would probably still be healthier and cheaper to feed kids something like what poor Indians or Mexicans eat - lentils and rice, or corn and beans, with salad on the side. I just don't get what the impetus is for our government overlords to feed our kids crap to destroy their bodies and minds. It seems almost like a purposefully evil plot.

306aa57660d911781231f8090c2a5619

(3808)

on August 16, 2011
at 07:50 PM

Don't be sure that breastfeeding isn't enough! It's very common for breastfed babies to grow faster during the first few months, then slow down. Formula-fed babies tend to have a more steady, linear growth pattern. That's the "norm" on which many growth charts are based, but not necessarily what is natural and right. Google for "breastfed baby growth chart" and see how she's doing according to that. Also, don't feel you have to start with purees. Give her chunks of soft food like banana, avocado, steamed carrots, or squash and see what she does. She'll figure it out eventually on her own!

0
04e3b66d5b3ca0aad698f0ea7f88f820

on August 15, 2011
at 07:02 PM

What a nutritious diet! My daughter's looked similar when she was that age. She ate a bit more carbs though. I mixed raw egg yolk in mashed banana, squeezed fresh oj sometimes, offered a little sweet potato and even gave her just a bit of white rice as sushi (she loved, and still loves, her raw fish). When we lived in California, she drank a little fermented raw milk too (this was after 18 months of breast feeding of course).

As far as the playground, f*** 'em. Who cares what everyone else is doing!

Or, you could go get yourself in a new play group...

For my daughter's first couple of years I was involved in the WAPF meetup group in the South San Francisco Bay. We met up a couple of times a week to play and hang out. While they ate fermented grains and I didn't, the food at the gatherings was always healthy and the mindset so much different than your average American family.

04e3b66d5b3ca0aad698f0ea7f88f820

on August 15, 2011
at 07:06 PM

I've got a few posts about school lunches up on my blog http://theprimalparent.com/2011/08/14/school-lunches-part-2/ http://theprimalparent.com/2011/08/07/school-lunches-part-1/ And a whole lot of talk about getting kids kids to go along with this, like this one: http://theprimalparent.com/2011/06/21/paleo-kids-combating-outside-influences/

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