3

votes

Trick or Treat: How to treat kids well and not trick them with bad sweets?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created October 30, 2010 at 11:36 PM

Halloween is upon us and I'm wondering right now for all the kids knocking at my door. How can I treat them with some sweets without tricking them into bad things?

Do you know of any paleo sweets that will be accepted by the kiddies and are good (or at least not bad) for them?

What are you going to provide for them or do you have any ideas?

61b801de5dc345b557cd4623d4a4f26b

(2682)

on October 31, 2011
at 01:01 PM

The play-doh sounds like a great idea! All my Sam's Club had (when I checked) was the huge bags of candy. I spent more than $10 on the toys/trinkets I bought, but at least the kids won't be getting their sugar fix from my house. 8)

61b801de5dc345b557cd4623d4a4f26b

(2682)

on October 31, 2011
at 12:59 PM

This is the route I took this year. I've heard from several parents that their kids enjoy the toys more than the candy, so I'm super excited about it.

B6114a1980b1481fb18206064f3f4a4f

(3924)

on October 28, 2011
at 09:01 PM

I like your realistic approach also. I think it's important to let our children experience our culture's social traditions and that unfortunately includes a lot of junk our culture calls food. Protect the home front, then let them go forth . . . I also follow this philosophy with the food blog I write for families and children who are dealing with oxalate issues. They have so many food limitations anyway, I can't imagine trying to make the site too Paleo oriented because it just isn't realistic for their daily lives. If I get too strict then I'm no longer being of service to them.

B294438548c32ed878905baf6cd1b332

on November 01, 2010
at 03:39 AM

I hear ya, but I think the big thing is to address day-to-day consumption of sweets and junk. Even if a kid has a piece of birthday cake and some candy once a week every week, s/he is much better off than 99% of other kids in the Western world who eat and drink the equivalent of that (or more) daily. When the day-to-day is taken care of, their appetite for eating tons of sweets on special occasions seems to diminish as well.

100fd85230060e754fc13394eee6d6f1

(18706)

on November 01, 2010
at 03:30 AM

Fruit leather is concentrated sugar, though.

100fd85230060e754fc13394eee6d6f1

(18706)

on November 01, 2010
at 03:30 AM

But if the calories all come from sugar, then it's equivalent to saying raisins have more sugar in them than candies. Plus they stick in your teeth and cause cavities.

100fd85230060e754fc13394eee6d6f1

(18706)

on November 01, 2010
at 03:28 AM

I agree, but there is a Halloween-like event almost every month, plus birthday parties. I can't seem to find a stretch of 3 weeks in which my children don't have some special occasion. That's not minute and infrequent enough for me.

4e40d2b9e1a762949a25b958762aa10d

(762)

on October 31, 2010
at 11:52 AM

Halloween also has a social aspect. Why choose this night to be a nutritional 'teaching moment', when it is likely that the young kids will remember more hurt or confused feelings than nutritional principles. There is a time and place.

4ff24fb9a7d48305681487dfb8040a5e

(383)

on October 31, 2010
at 05:14 AM

Thanks everybody for your answers! I like the idea with the quarters instead of candy. This will not make me feel guilty and they actually get a responsibility how to use that money. Two birds with one stone I'd say

B294438548c32ed878905baf6cd1b332

on October 31, 2010
at 04:07 AM

There's lots of us. :)

095ef76482234d3db444b77d7ed01c29

(2755)

on October 31, 2010
at 02:16 AM

Minute, infrequent, exposure? Wow, someone else with a realistic approach. I like the way you put this.

E46d4f7e35e46ee4e8211ab4bc852023

(1510)

on October 31, 2010
at 02:04 AM

I think it all depends on how much you want to spend. Mini Lara Bars are $10 for 12 and Stretch Island Fruit Leather is like 40¢ a piece at Trader Joes. Unfortunately much steeper than 50 pieces of candy for $8. I agree with Angelo's comment below, you don't want to spend extra for something that gets tossed in the trash.

E46d4f7e35e46ee4e8211ab4bc852023

(1510)

on October 31, 2010
at 01:13 AM

interesting, although I'm not sure about the emphasis on calorie counting.

D30ff86ad2c1f3b43b99aed213bcf461

on October 31, 2010
at 12:33 AM

Mark Sisson once noted in a post about cheating that candy corn has less calories per cup than raisins. I loved his quote: "Yeah, how do you like that, Mr. Happy Sun on my Raisin Bran with your two scoops of doom?" http://www.marksdailyapple.com/cheat/

B294438548c32ed878905baf6cd1b332

on October 31, 2010
at 12:16 AM

We brought in a box of Lara Bars to my daughters first grade class for her to have when they are passing out sweets. The first time this happened, the teacher gave the Lara Bar to the wrong kid. She cried.

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14 Answers

best answer

6
3a325ffc389f14f090ca464b95e72914

(205)

on October 31, 2010
at 02:17 AM

We give quarters to each kid. They're excited to get money and we're not contributing to their sugar intake.

9
B294438548c32ed878905baf6cd1b332

on October 31, 2010
at 12:14 AM

I don't think Paleo principles mix well with Halloween, period. So, you either buy the mixed bags of Baby Ruths, Butterfingers, and Crunch bars...or you just turn off the porch light.

Either that, or you can hand out something that gets tossed in the trash.

The longer I'm on Paleo, the more I've come to understand that minute, infrequent exposure to Neolithic foods, processed foods, etc. isn't the problem. It's the prolonged exposure to these things that seem to lead to systemic health conditions. And, I'm also coming to suspect that wheat & fructose are 90% of the problem.

So, if you put a Green & Black 85% chocolate bar in someone's plastic pumpkin full of candy corn, circus peanuts, and Tootsie Rolls is it really going to make a difference? Especially if the parents end up eating it anyway?

Sometimes we have opposing values -- for instance 1) we want to participate in a widely practiced tradition in our communities (like Halloween) and 2) we want to abide by our Paleo principles. Sometimes compromising makes sense, and sometimes it doesn't. This is one of those scenarios where it doesn't, IMO, and it falls under the 'dont-worry-abboudit' category.

B294438548c32ed878905baf6cd1b332

on October 31, 2010
at 04:07 AM

There's lots of us. :)

095ef76482234d3db444b77d7ed01c29

(2755)

on October 31, 2010
at 02:16 AM

Minute, infrequent, exposure? Wow, someone else with a realistic approach. I like the way you put this.

100fd85230060e754fc13394eee6d6f1

(18706)

on November 01, 2010
at 03:28 AM

I agree, but there is a Halloween-like event almost every month, plus birthday parties. I can't seem to find a stretch of 3 weeks in which my children don't have some special occasion. That's not minute and infrequent enough for me.

B294438548c32ed878905baf6cd1b332

on November 01, 2010
at 03:39 AM

I hear ya, but I think the big thing is to address day-to-day consumption of sweets and junk. Even if a kid has a piece of birthday cake and some candy once a week every week, s/he is much better off than 99% of other kids in the Western world who eat and drink the equivalent of that (or more) daily. When the day-to-day is taken care of, their appetite for eating tons of sweets on special occasions seems to diminish as well.

B6114a1980b1481fb18206064f3f4a4f

(3924)

on October 28, 2011
at 09:01 PM

I like your realistic approach also. I think it's important to let our children experience our culture's social traditions and that unfortunately includes a lot of junk our culture calls food. Protect the home front, then let them go forth . . . I also follow this philosophy with the food blog I write for families and children who are dealing with oxalate issues. They have so many food limitations anyway, I can't imagine trying to make the site too Paleo oriented because it just isn't realistic for their daily lives. If I get too strict then I'm no longer being of service to them.

8
0dc1d63c3d5975f5115f535c6a90c9dd

(2283)

on October 31, 2010
at 12:19 AM

Pencils, stickers, erasers, temporary tattoos...

Just little non-food trinkets that kids love. Personally, we have 3 kids and they love those things.

61b801de5dc345b557cd4623d4a4f26b

(2682)

on October 31, 2011
at 12:59 PM

This is the route I took this year. I've heard from several parents that their kids enjoy the toys more than the candy, so I'm super excited about it.

4
095ef76482234d3db444b77d7ed01c29

(2755)

on October 31, 2010
at 02:15 AM

Ostara, Samhain and Yule times of feasting and enjoyment...kids are kids...let them enjoy it. Feed them well all year long, teach them good habits all year long. For those very rare, special occasions say to heck with it and let them be kids... You will likely be surprised at how little junk they will actually consume on the rare occasions it's allowed. Or at least mine don't eat much of it. Sometime in summer, we found and tossed out undeaten Ostara candy (easter for those who don't know history) that the kids weren't interested in.

I'm actually doing a non paleo carb load tonight for an olympic lifting contest tomorrow. After breakfast, I'll return to the paleo foods again with no permanent damage to my health from a few Reece's peanut butter cups.

3
D30ff86ad2c1f3b43b99aed213bcf461

on October 31, 2010
at 12:29 AM

See this preexisting Paleohacks thread on doing Halloween Paleo-style:

http://paleohacks.com/questions/11724/halloween-and-paleo-kids#axzz13tLqR5Ci

Also, I saw a 60-pack of minitubs of Play-Doh at Sam's Club today, for just under $10. I thought that was a reasonable alternative (though yes, it is made with wheat, exactly how many kids will be eating Play-Doh...? ;-p).

61b801de5dc345b557cd4623d4a4f26b

(2682)

on October 31, 2011
at 01:01 PM

The play-doh sounds like a great idea! All my Sam's Club had (when I checked) was the huge bags of candy. I spent more than $10 on the toys/trinkets I bought, but at least the kids won't be getting their sugar fix from my house. 8)

2
62ed65f3596aa2f62fa1d58a0c09f8c3

(20807)

on October 31, 2010
at 04:00 AM

Kids can have fun without getting candy or dubious quality health food. Get out your jar of pennies, nickles, dimes and quarters. Depending on your finances, you can supplement heavily with pennies and nickles from the bank. Put it all in a big bowl and find a little scoop and some plastic baggies. Every trick or treater gets to close his/her eyes and scoop one scoop of change. THe scoop gets put in a little plastic baggy to take home. I'll bet they will like the money more than candies. WIth the money, they can get whatever they want. When I was a kid, this would be the kind of thing I would have wanted. Your house will be the house that all the kids will want to sneak back to for a second helping! ;-)

1
2f653fa504adc81612619106e7d1f65e

on October 31, 2010
at 06:41 PM

It's the kids one day of indulgence, having a 6 & 8 year old myself it's a tradition that they've gotten used to and I won't pull the plug if they enjoy this one day of fun.

1
072fd69647b0e765bb4b11532569f16d

(3717)

on October 31, 2010
at 03:32 AM

Pass the peanut M&Ms for one night.

1
5680f5060a62bb3790478473a5643afe

(290)

on October 31, 2010
at 12:05 AM

You could offer some things like:

  • Stretch Island Fruit Leather (Like a fruit roll-up but there's no roll or psychedelic color scheme to them)
  • Mini Lara Bars
  • Perhaps little packets of Justin's nut butter?

...Just throwing some ideas out there.

4e40d2b9e1a762949a25b958762aa10d

(762)

on October 31, 2010
at 11:52 AM

Halloween also has a social aspect. Why choose this night to be a nutritional 'teaching moment', when it is likely that the young kids will remember more hurt or confused feelings than nutritional principles. There is a time and place.

E46d4f7e35e46ee4e8211ab4bc852023

(1510)

on October 31, 2010
at 02:04 AM

I think it all depends on how much you want to spend. Mini Lara Bars are $10 for 12 and Stretch Island Fruit Leather is like 40¢ a piece at Trader Joes. Unfortunately much steeper than 50 pieces of candy for $8. I agree with Angelo's comment below, you don't want to spend extra for something that gets tossed in the trash.

B294438548c32ed878905baf6cd1b332

on October 31, 2010
at 12:16 AM

We brought in a box of Lara Bars to my daughters first grade class for her to have when they are passing out sweets. The first time this happened, the teacher gave the Lara Bar to the wrong kid. She cried.

100fd85230060e754fc13394eee6d6f1

(18706)

on November 01, 2010
at 03:30 AM

Fruit leather is concentrated sugar, though.

1
E46d4f7e35e46ee4e8211ab4bc852023

(1510)

on October 30, 2010
at 11:47 PM

You could be that house that gives out.... little boxes of raisins.

E46d4f7e35e46ee4e8211ab4bc852023

(1510)

on October 31, 2010
at 01:13 AM

interesting, although I'm not sure about the emphasis on calorie counting.

D30ff86ad2c1f3b43b99aed213bcf461

on October 31, 2010
at 12:33 AM

Mark Sisson once noted in a post about cheating that candy corn has less calories per cup than raisins. I loved his quote: "Yeah, how do you like that, Mr. Happy Sun on my Raisin Bran with your two scoops of doom?" http://www.marksdailyapple.com/cheat/

100fd85230060e754fc13394eee6d6f1

(18706)

on November 01, 2010
at 03:30 AM

But if the calories all come from sugar, then it's equivalent to saying raisins have more sugar in them than candies. Plus they stick in your teeth and cause cavities.

0
5ef574d7893bc816ec52e04139e9bc09

(6097)

on October 30, 2011
at 08:31 PM

Give each kid a hard-boiled egg.

0
21b36b3de8ff31b0d41e7f0f4b5c1e03

(1688)

on October 30, 2011
at 07:51 PM

I will hand out Larvets and Crick-ettes. They are nutritious and very Halloween. http://www.hotlix.com/insect_candy/insect_candy.html

0
A912ff969107d3eda04ee78c683a6bc5

on October 30, 2011
at 07:16 PM

Bought some candy for tomorrow's beggars. I'll save one of each for myself and dump the rest at work. Thought I'd bump this for everybody else.

-1
Ba19a9bb54c278f684eb959b7fbe9ed5

on April 25, 2013
at 02:55 AM

Among all the detecting activities, gold metal detecting is the most interesting one. We can not only relax both our mind and body , but also find a big fortune if we are lucky enough. Next time if you feel bored, you can pick up a metal detector for gold and have a try.

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