12

votes

Do your kids look Paleo?

Answered on September 12, 2014
Created December 22, 2012 at 1:52 AM

I've read in many places about the changes that occurred to humans once they adopted a Neo lifestyle. This movement is far enough along that we should have some kids who were raised Paleo again. Are you seeing any differences? Are their brains bigger? Do they have larger jaws? What other skeletal differences do you see?

EDIT: Latest inspiration for this post from Wheat Belly

Medium avatar

(3213)

on December 27, 2012
at 03:57 AM

Then we should call it devolution, don't you think?

A2c38be4c54c91a15071f82f14cac0b3

(12682)

on December 26, 2012
at 05:05 AM

Well, predisposition to diseases like diabetes are often due to evolutionary adaptation.

Medium avatar

(3213)

on December 26, 2012
at 04:35 AM

Dune, diabetes is a disease not an evolutionary adaptation

5bac45c78a2be60bc17fc2084a0f5d43

(259)

on December 25, 2012
at 02:57 AM

Skepticism is totally understandable, but keep in mind that influence of long term paleo diet on kids look is not yet well-known! Maybe we are going to have more cases like this as paleo diet becomes more popular ;)

Medium avatar

(3213)

on December 24, 2012
at 05:28 AM

Hahahahahaha, gotta be kidding

Medium avatar

(3213)

on December 24, 2012
at 05:27 AM

Yes, you are right, I misunderstood the statement/question

De267f213b375efca5da07890e5efc25

(3747)

on December 24, 2012
at 05:22 AM

Who's the dad again? :P That kid looks pretty good!

5bac45c78a2be60bc17fc2084a0f5d43

(259)

on December 23, 2012
at 10:44 PM

It is hard to tell without proper research. Probably it is not genes change but phenotype. Or another reason. Anyway, their kid definitely looks paleo.

E253f8ac1d139bf4d0bfb44debd1db21

on December 23, 2012
at 02:54 PM

so as a result of paleo their genes trandifferentiated from nordic to aboriginal?

C0fcb48d7da4f76fac17318efd2cd6b8

(4069)

on December 23, 2012
at 05:09 AM

Well it didn't take thousands if not millions of years for diabetes to become rampant!

0df0b1c6ae16bbb75b4a5efa3d876765

(2240)

on December 23, 2012
at 02:11 AM

See my comment to Alvaro above.

0df0b1c6ae16bbb75b4a5efa3d876765

(2240)

on December 23, 2012
at 02:11 AM

Point I meant to make was if negative changes could occur that quickly, it's quite likely positive changes could, too.

0df0b1c6ae16bbb75b4a5efa3d876765

(2240)

on December 23, 2012
at 02:10 AM

No downvote here either, but I'd like to recommend you read some Weston A. Price. He often noted drastic differences and declines in health in many cultures in just the first generation after they adopted grains/etc. Here is his book online - http://gutenberg.net.au/ebooks02/0200251h.html

A2c38be4c54c91a15071f82f14cac0b3

(12682)

on December 22, 2012
at 11:04 PM

Yeah, some people seem to think this question is about evolutionary changes in genes, but it's clearly not. It's more likely about changes in gene expression and the acquisition of nutrients needed for optimal development, as borofergie has just said said.

A2c38be4c54c91a15071f82f14cac0b3

(12682)

on December 22, 2012
at 11:03 PM

Some people seem to think this question is about evolutionary changes in genes, but it's clearly not. It's more likely about changes in gene expression and the acquisition of nutrients needed for optimal development, which could definitely cause observable change in one generation.

B3173217a49b5b0116078775a17eb21d

(11488)

on December 22, 2012
at 10:47 PM

It has nothing to do with evolution, it's epigenetics: how your genes are expressed in relation to your environment. It's absolutely possible to see improvements in a generation or less.

B3173217a49b5b0116078775a17eb21d

(11488)

on December 22, 2012
at 10:46 PM

It has nothing to do with evolution, it's epigenetics: how your genes are expressed in relation to your environment. It's absolutely possible to see improvements in a generation or less.

Cb9a270955e2c277a02c4a4b5dad10b5

(10989)

on December 22, 2012
at 10:43 PM

If the parents have perfect bone structure then eating a paleo styled diet probably wouldn't make the kids look super more paleo. But assuming the parents had sub par bone structure because of dietary/lifestyle choices, but give their children all the nutrients they were missing, it is very reasonable for someone's children to look exceptionally paleo compared to their parents even.

2e1591c76896828077b930de5107f1af

on December 22, 2012
at 10:16 PM

it is not realistic to think that evolution happens so rapidly, it would take far more generations to see a significant difference in the jaw structure. but it might be possible to see differences in behavior and hormones.

3846a3b61bc9051e4baebdef62e58c52

(18635)

on December 22, 2012
at 03:14 PM

I didn't down vote you for it or anything....couple other people musta done that.

705e66484ed64fe8e188123de398413e

(1013)

on December 22, 2012
at 06:42 AM

Agreed - I don't have any kids to use a reference points but Weston A Price liked to show smaller jaws/disproportionate faces after neolithic diets were introduced

Medium avatar

(3213)

on December 22, 2012
at 05:55 AM

Ok.............

3846a3b61bc9051e4baebdef62e58c52

(18635)

on December 22, 2012
at 03:22 AM

Not really. I mean if you read the books and such you will see that you can attribute many of the things OP is talking about to development.

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9 Answers

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11
Cb9a270955e2c277a02c4a4b5dad10b5

(10989)

on December 22, 2012
at 03:13 AM

What is wrong with you guys down-voting him. This is a good question. The brain part might be a little over-zealous but it is VERY realistic to see skeletal changes in the following generation. Jaw size is related to testosterone levels in men and eating lots of saturated fats along with fat soluble vitamins a d k2 promote healthy testosterone levels in growing adolescents and men. It is wholly probably to see first generation differences in skeleton, specifically dental health, palate formation, bmd etc based on a child's diet growing up.

I don't have any kids, but I can tell you I'm 22, male, and my bones are still growing though in girth more than height, and paleo-isque bone-growing-friendly foods are a big part of my diet. This is a VERY reasonable question, I do not appreciate the -2 votes when I arrived.

705e66484ed64fe8e188123de398413e

(1013)

on December 22, 2012
at 06:42 AM

Agreed - I don't have any kids to use a reference points but Weston A Price liked to show smaller jaws/disproportionate faces after neolithic diets were introduced

Cb9a270955e2c277a02c4a4b5dad10b5

(10989)

on December 22, 2012
at 10:43 PM

If the parents have perfect bone structure then eating a paleo styled diet probably wouldn't make the kids look super more paleo. But assuming the parents had sub par bone structure because of dietary/lifestyle choices, but give their children all the nutrients they were missing, it is very reasonable for someone's children to look exceptionally paleo compared to their parents even.

B3173217a49b5b0116078775a17eb21d

(11488)

on December 22, 2012
at 10:46 PM

It has nothing to do with evolution, it's epigenetics: how your genes are expressed in relation to your environment. It's absolutely possible to see improvements in a generation or less.

A2c38be4c54c91a15071f82f14cac0b3

(12682)

on December 22, 2012
at 11:04 PM

Yeah, some people seem to think this question is about evolutionary changes in genes, but it's clearly not. It's more likely about changes in gene expression and the acquisition of nutrients needed for optimal development, as borofergie has just said said.

2e1591c76896828077b930de5107f1af

on December 22, 2012
at 10:16 PM

it is not realistic to think that evolution happens so rapidly, it would take far more generations to see a significant difference in the jaw structure. but it might be possible to see differences in behavior and hormones.

A2c38be4c54c91a15071f82f14cac0b3

(12682)

on December 22, 2012
at 11:03 PM

Some people seem to think this question is about evolutionary changes in genes, but it's clearly not. It's more likely about changes in gene expression and the acquisition of nutrients needed for optimal development, which could definitely cause observable change in one generation.

3
3846a3b61bc9051e4baebdef62e58c52

(18635)

on December 22, 2012
at 03:26 AM

Dunno with my kids yet. Too young and my wife and I were not paleo pre-delivery. I can tell you that I personally have a large enough jaw to accompany all of my wisdom teeth and have them currently. I also never required braces. I think those are two indications of good nutrition during development personally. We shall see if my kids follow the same pattern. So far my 5 year old has straight strong teeth, and is not injured easily. He is bright and very energetic. My three year old was born with Polands syndrome, so we will be continuing to work with him structurally until adulthood.

2
Db20e80aec9abf291a7f685d2b0ed42e

(55)

on December 22, 2012
at 11:21 PM

This is certainly a sensible question. The following link is useful in understanding how diet can affect the foetus right down to the level of switching genes on and off, either for short periods in the womb or permanently, all the way through gestation, childhood and adulthood. Some of these effects are likely to affect the appearance of the child as they grow up.

http://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nutriepigenomics

0
5c9fda2bd0018516806bba200a93f6fa

(608)

on December 26, 2012
at 05:16 AM

If you raise a child on an ancestral diet, he/she will grow with thicker stronger bones, larger teeth and jaws, good skull shape and healthy eyes and sexual development, better gut health and have clearer skin than your average american teen eating a SAD style diet. If i have a child, i will raise him/her from day one on a natural paleo type diet.

0
5bac45c78a2be60bc17fc2084a0f5d43

(259)

on December 23, 2012
at 12:44 AM

My friends are blond scandinavian type couple. Two years before giving birth to their child they started paleo. Now he is healthy child with well developed jaw bones (see picture). Paleo definitely worked. (or maybe their visit to Australia around a year before the kid was born)

textareado-your-kids-look-paleo?textarea

5bac45c78a2be60bc17fc2084a0f5d43

(259)

on December 23, 2012
at 10:44 PM

It is hard to tell without proper research. Probably it is not genes change but phenotype. Or another reason. Anyway, their kid definitely looks paleo.

E253f8ac1d139bf4d0bfb44debd1db21

on December 23, 2012
at 02:54 PM

so as a result of paleo their genes trandifferentiated from nordic to aboriginal?

Medium avatar

(3213)

on December 24, 2012
at 05:28 AM

Hahahahahaha, gotta be kidding

De267f213b375efca5da07890e5efc25

(3747)

on December 24, 2012
at 05:22 AM

Who's the dad again? :P That kid looks pretty good!

5bac45c78a2be60bc17fc2084a0f5d43

(259)

on December 25, 2012
at 02:57 AM

Skepticism is totally understandable, but keep in mind that influence of long term paleo diet on kids look is not yet well-known! Maybe we are going to have more cases like this as paleo diet becomes more popular ;)

0
6120c989fd5b69f42a0834b69b87955b

(24553)

on December 23, 2012
at 12:36 AM

I've been wondering about this myself. Comparing the ultrasound photos, between 1st and 2nd baby (who I haven't met yet) the second with whom I had been much more into organ meats and took k2 from before the time he was conceived has a much more pronounced jawline and wider palate. I don't know if this is just a normal genetic variation that would have occurred anyway, or if it was influenced by better nutrition. I've asked every single health care professional we've talked to so far about this, and they've all looked at me like I have 2 heads when I ask. Who knows? I like to think I had a good influence on his development.

0
2e1591c76896828077b930de5107f1af

on December 22, 2012
at 10:17 PM

it is not realistic to think that evolution happens so rapidly, it would take far more generations to see a significant difference in the jaw structure. but it might be possible to see differences in behavior and hormones.

For more Paleo Diet hacks: http://paleohacks.com/questions/168620/do-your-kids-look-paleo#ixzz2Fp0svJPj Follow us: @PaleoHacks on Twitter | PaleoHacks on Facebook

-1
Medium avatar

(3213)

on December 22, 2012
at 02:38 AM

Is this a real question? or are you kidding?

It takes thousands if not millions of years for evolutionary changes to take place.

*I misunderstood the question. Yes, there can be changes in the human body by a drastic change in nutrition, specially if you are on the growing stage, this changes are produced mainly by the endocrine system and hormone production.

0df0b1c6ae16bbb75b4a5efa3d876765

(2240)

on December 23, 2012
at 02:11 AM

Point I meant to make was if negative changes could occur that quickly, it's quite likely positive changes could, too.

B3173217a49b5b0116078775a17eb21d

(11488)

on December 22, 2012
at 10:47 PM

It has nothing to do with evolution, it's epigenetics: how your genes are expressed in relation to your environment. It's absolutely possible to see improvements in a generation or less.

Medium avatar

(3213)

on December 22, 2012
at 05:55 AM

Ok.............

3846a3b61bc9051e4baebdef62e58c52

(18635)

on December 22, 2012
at 03:14 PM

I didn't down vote you for it or anything....couple other people musta done that.

Medium avatar

(3213)

on December 24, 2012
at 05:27 AM

Yes, you are right, I misunderstood the statement/question

Medium avatar

(3213)

on December 26, 2012
at 04:35 AM

Dune, diabetes is a disease not an evolutionary adaptation

C0fcb48d7da4f76fac17318efd2cd6b8

(4069)

on December 23, 2012
at 05:09 AM

Well it didn't take thousands if not millions of years for diabetes to become rampant!

3846a3b61bc9051e4baebdef62e58c52

(18635)

on December 22, 2012
at 03:22 AM

Not really. I mean if you read the books and such you will see that you can attribute many of the things OP is talking about to development.

A2c38be4c54c91a15071f82f14cac0b3

(12682)

on December 26, 2012
at 05:05 AM

Well, predisposition to diseases like diabetes are often due to evolutionary adaptation.

0df0b1c6ae16bbb75b4a5efa3d876765

(2240)

on December 23, 2012
at 02:10 AM

No downvote here either, but I'd like to recommend you read some Weston A. Price. He often noted drastic differences and declines in health in many cultures in just the first generation after they adopted grains/etc. Here is his book online - http://gutenberg.net.au/ebooks02/0200251h.html

Medium avatar

(3213)

on December 27, 2012
at 03:57 AM

Then we should call it devolution, don't you think?

-3
A048b66e08306d405986b6c04bf5e8e4

on December 22, 2012
at 02:35 AM

I don't have any kids, but I don't think that one generation is enough to make the next generation "look" Paleo

0df0b1c6ae16bbb75b4a5efa3d876765

(2240)

on December 23, 2012
at 02:11 AM

See my comment to Alvaro above.

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