2

votes

Why is bone broth paleo? Or more...Do you do primitive cooking?

Answered on September 12, 2014
Created August 30, 2011 at 5:21 PM

I was once in the norwegian mountains and we had this primitive cooking without pots.

We actually only used sticks and hold them in fire. There are serveral primitive cooking methods on the web on youtube or in surivaland outdoor or priomitive skill books and alll the primitive skill gatheirngs in the USA. RabittStick and Falling Leave and echoes in Time... feral futures. wildroots....

teaching drum....

What ever... why are dishes cooked in pans Paleo? Where did they had the iron in the paleo time?????

When do they discover to cook in pots? When they made the first clay pots??

Do you do any sort of primitive cooking at the fire???

47a42b6be94caf700fce9509e38bb6a4

(9647)

on August 31, 2011
at 11:12 PM

Awesome, thanks air-h.

C56baa1b4f39839c018180bf63226f7d

(3499)

on August 31, 2011
at 05:38 AM

@WCC_Paul America's Test Kitchen did a side experiment while working on making a foolproof bone-in pork roast, not only comparing bone-in to boneless roasts, but making a "roast" out of mashed potatoes and sticking the bones into it. The bones exuded a significant amount of flavor compounds into the potatoes; intuition tells me that it's highly likely that the nutrition comes along for the ride.

0e4e5882872d6a7c472ea51aec457e66

(1994)

on August 31, 2011
at 05:28 AM

Isn't there evidence of cooking stones? http://archaeology.about.com/od/sterms/qt/stone_boiling.htm

47a42b6be94caf700fce9509e38bb6a4

(9647)

on August 30, 2011
at 09:38 PM

I wonder do the goodies from the bones leak out into the rest of the meat and other food that's down there? So you'd be getting some of the same minerals you get from a bone broth?

3aea514b680d01bfd7573d74517946a7

(11996)

on August 30, 2011
at 08:15 PM

Oh, gods, yes. A pig cooked this way is divine. Especially if you leave it overnight.

Medium avatar

(39821)

on August 30, 2011
at 08:12 PM

Meant to say "marrow/brain extraction."

7e746be2f0e550a8cd7df881322ae705

(18701)

on August 30, 2011
at 08:06 PM

Good point, Jay!

Fbfeabf01eb1ee04cca22d44edc1275e

(10)

on August 30, 2011
at 07:53 PM

Will def have to try this sometime !

Medium avatar

(39821)

on August 30, 2011
at 07:00 PM

Does marrow extraction fall under the purview of grease processing?

9d43f6873107e17ca4d1a5055aa7a2ad

on August 30, 2011
at 06:05 PM

in research it's not called broth making, it's called "grease processing" and there is a lot of evidence for it

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6 Answers

5
9d43f6873107e17ca4d1a5055aa7a2ad

on August 30, 2011
at 05:25 PM

Whether or not foragers do have pottery depends a lot on what one selects as one???s ???ethnographic present.??? Pottery was a fairly common part of the technological repertoire of foragers worldwide until Europeans introduced metal pots and pans, at which point many groups abandoned the use of clay containers. For example, if one relies on the descriptions of the San from the twentieth century, as most of us do, the ethnographies are virtually silent on the topic of pottery. But if one looks at the Later Stone Age archaeology of southern Africa, or the written accounts left by the first Dutch and English explorers to set foot in South Africa, it becomes evident that pottery was a fairly widespread component of Bushman culinary technology (Bollong et al. 1997; Mazel 1992; Rudner 1979). The earliest pottery thus far known appears in Late Pleistocene hunter???gatherer sites in eastern Russia, Japan, and China, with dates as early as ~13,000 radiocarbon years ago or up to 18,000 calibrated years ago (Boaretto et al. 2009; Keally et al. 2004; Kuzmin 2006; Zhang 2002). Ceramics also appear quite early in Africa, dating between 9,000 and 9,500 years ago in the central Sudan, as well as in northeast Niger and Libya (Garcea 2006; Haaland 1992). ???In most of North Africa??? the production of pottery and groundstone is independent of the origins of food domestication. It occurred about 3,000 years earlier, dating from around 9,000 years BP and 6,000 BP, respectively??? (Garcea 2006:201).

  • John D. Speth, the Paleoanthropology and Archaeology of Big Game Hunting

Other containers, made out of gourds or skins, are not preserved in the archaeological record, but are regularly used by foragers.

0e4e5882872d6a7c472ea51aec457e66

(1994)

on August 31, 2011
at 05:28 AM

Isn't there evidence of cooking stones? http://archaeology.about.com/od/sterms/qt/stone_boiling.htm

4
66974b2cb291799dcd661b7dec99a9e2

(11121)

on August 30, 2011
at 06:38 PM

Another ancestral' way to cook is to build a fire in a pit burn it down to coals layer leaves and food over the coals then bury it and leave for 4-8 hours - food cooked this way is beyond describing.

Fbfeabf01eb1ee04cca22d44edc1275e

(10)

on August 30, 2011
at 07:53 PM

Will def have to try this sometime !

3aea514b680d01bfd7573d74517946a7

(11996)

on August 30, 2011
at 08:15 PM

Oh, gods, yes. A pig cooked this way is divine. Especially if you leave it overnight.

47a42b6be94caf700fce9509e38bb6a4

(9647)

on August 30, 2011
at 09:38 PM

I wonder do the goodies from the bones leak out into the rest of the meat and other food that's down there? So you'd be getting some of the same minerals you get from a bone broth?

C56baa1b4f39839c018180bf63226f7d

(3499)

on August 31, 2011
at 05:38 AM

@WCC_Paul America's Test Kitchen did a side experiment while working on making a foolproof bone-in pork roast, not only comparing bone-in to boneless roasts, but making a "roast" out of mashed potatoes and sticking the bones into it. The bones exuded a significant amount of flavor compounds into the potatoes; intuition tells me that it's highly likely that the nutrition comes along for the ride.

47a42b6be94caf700fce9509e38bb6a4

(9647)

on August 31, 2011
at 11:12 PM

Awesome, thanks air-h.

3
Medium avatar

on August 30, 2011
at 05:47 PM

Regarding bone broth specifically, though none of your ancestors may have consumed it, it's an effective way to replace the calcium, magnesium, cartilage etc. that they were getting from other sources. Tastes good too.

9d43f6873107e17ca4d1a5055aa7a2ad

on August 30, 2011
at 06:05 PM

in research it's not called broth making, it's called "grease processing" and there is a lot of evidence for it

Medium avatar

(39821)

on August 30, 2011
at 07:00 PM

Does marrow extraction fall under the purview of grease processing?

Medium avatar

(39821)

on August 30, 2011
at 08:12 PM

Meant to say "marrow/brain extraction."

2
4781cf8ae1bfcb558dfb056af17bea94

(4359)

on August 30, 2011
at 08:01 PM

Charred meat probably isn't so good for you, even though our ancestors may have had more of it than we do.

7e746be2f0e550a8cd7df881322ae705

(18701)

on August 30, 2011
at 08:06 PM

Good point, Jay!

2
9e975c86f483555ed19e59c5628488ca

(823)

on August 30, 2011
at 06:28 PM

Just because ancestors did or did not do something doesn't make it good or bad. Your ancestors also probably did a lot more murdering than you plan to, and ate with feces on their hands???

2
Ef9f83cb4e1826261a44c173f733789e

on August 30, 2011
at 05:48 PM

Paleo doesn't mean reenactment, so yes, broth and cooking vessels can be paleo. The word is only a metaphor.

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