7

votes

What is paleo about your country?

Answered on September 12, 2014
Created October 01, 2011 at 12:12 PM

What I wonder is: what do you really appreciate when it comes to food/food availability/traditions in your home country? Even developments. Have you been noticing a change in attitude towards fresh, local food? etc.

Me (from Germany):

I love the fact that I can smother everything in butter without being frowned upon and that I can order a ridiulous amount of meat with potatoes almost anywhere.

I appreciate all the local, mostly organic markets which are in many districts in my city.

I really love that many restaurants focus on local foods.

Many germans rather go to their trusted butcher at the corner than buying meat at the supermarket.

Organic stores are booming.

If you are ever short of pastured eggs, come here.

Tell me about the positive sides of your country when it comes to eating whole, natural foods!

006f2e9b763058ff2332681c206563e4

(252)

on June 05, 2014
at 03:02 PM

where are you from Promordial? Can't find grass fed meat ANYWHERE here :(

006f2e9b763058ff2332681c206563e4

(252)

on June 05, 2014
at 03:00 PM

I'm also from germany! But can't find grass fed beef ANYWHERE! Where ou get yours from?

Bc3fd048801a984147b8970277037cdf

(180)

on October 17, 2011
at 11:37 AM

Hi annamalia, I am still relatively new to the Berlin area... perhaps you could get in contact with me? I am still searching for the last missing pieces of pastured products that I have yet to find. Not sure if I'm allowed to post my email here or not but here goes: jamesdeblasse -AT- gmail -DOT- com

5d5732f693afb35fa8755b032e75b6d6

on October 06, 2011
at 07:21 PM

Also, are you being sarcastic or conceited?

5d5732f693afb35fa8755b032e75b6d6

on October 06, 2011
at 07:19 PM

??? Pale? Do not understand this.

A727956fa3f943057c4edb08ad9e864e

(4183)

on October 05, 2011
at 09:49 PM

Two things, leberwurst and blutwurst.. om nom nom..

8c5533ffe71bd4262fedc7e898ead1ba

(1724)

on October 04, 2011
at 01:00 PM

Maybe a very few things "certified" (there's a nascent organization), but poor people can't afford fertilizer, so most stuff in the market is basically organic. Only problem is all they have are greens, tomatoes and onions.

Ec7cb2a7a68655954a01f03e95be1383

(1453)

on October 03, 2011
at 05:04 PM

I bet there are no more than 1-3 % of people focusing on whole foods... thats a sad minority.. :/

Ec7cb2a7a68655954a01f03e95be1383

(1453)

on October 03, 2011
at 05:03 PM

You are right, I deleted it - it has nothing to do with this topic. However, you have to agree that most people, due to medical drugs, education,etc. live in a state of ignorance, regarding diet and other things...

A994080d499afca98cdc9de896701ebd

(1281)

on October 03, 2011
at 04:50 PM

http://www.demeter.de/ebenenangleichung/zielgruppe/schnittmengen/geniessen/demeter-aktiv-partner/?F=&MP=10-1488 this might help you! all in all, demeter (especially produce) should be available in many organic stores like alnatura, naturata etc. you can buy directly from a demeter farm too!

Db4ad76f6f307a6f577e175710049172

(2297)

on October 03, 2011
at 02:52 PM

Primordial and annamalia - any idea where I can get Demeter products? Which are the good stores for this kind of stuff. Is the stuff from Kaufland acceptable?

A994080d499afca98cdc9de896701ebd

(1281)

on October 03, 2011
at 02:36 PM

But then again, of course Germany isn't the ultimate paleo country. I didn't want to make it better than it is. As is said, those are some POSITIVE thing I've witnessed. I could have ranted about all the vegans, believe me. For me, it's very easy to find sources that sell pastured meat and I see many people that focus on whole foods. It all depends on where you live, your social circle etc., I think.

A994080d499afca98cdc9de896701ebd

(1281)

on October 03, 2011
at 02:28 PM

For people who live close to Berlin and in Brandenburg, check out this: http://www.bio-berlin-brandenburg.de/fileadmin/Downloads/EKF_2011/EKF2011.pdf I buy meat from Melchhof, their beef and lamb is pastured.I've been there, they are so nice! there are also many farmers where you can buy eggs from. many supply stores in the city too. after some research I've finally found the perfect sources for everything I need :)

A994080d499afca98cdc9de896701ebd

(1281)

on October 03, 2011
at 02:23 PM

wow, ok. That last sentence sounds quite ignorant, don't you think? May I know where you live in Germany? I've lived in Bayern (in Murnau, close to Munich), Cologne and Berlin.) Of course I can only speak for those regions.

Ec7cb2a7a68655954a01f03e95be1383

(1453)

on October 03, 2011
at 01:49 PM

Dean you're right. But often Freilandhaltung means they are at least partly pastured, so it is definitely better.

Ec7cb2a7a68655954a01f03e95be1383

(1453)

on October 03, 2011
at 01:49 PM

Dean you're right. But often Freilandhaltung means they are at least a little bit pastured, so it may be better.

Ec7cb2a7a68655954a01f03e95be1383

(1453)

on October 03, 2011
at 01:48 PM

Dean you're right. But often Freilandhaltung means they can at least pasture a little bit.

Ec7cb2a7a68655954a01f03e95be1383

(1453)

on October 03, 2011
at 01:47 PM

Welcome in Germany! Hope you'll have a great time. Freilandhaltung is often better but its to a great part grain fed. It doesn't mean pastured but "the chicken can run outside on pasture, eat worms and grass but live heavily on grains". Demeter-Eggs come the nearest to pastured.

Ec7cb2a7a68655954a01f03e95be1383

(1453)

on October 03, 2011
at 01:47 PM

Freilandhaltung is often better but its to a great part grain fed. It doesn't mean pastured but "the chicken can run outside on pasture, eat worms and grass but live heavily on grains". Demeter-Eggs come the nearest to pastured.

2870a69b9c0c0a19a919e54cb3a62137

(1520)

on October 03, 2011
at 01:41 PM

As far as I know Freilandhaltung, Bodenhaltung, etc is more about living conditions than feeding. The chicken might get a little food outside, but I think they're also fed conventionally. Correct me if I'm wrong.

667f6c030b0245d71d8ef50c72b097dc

(15976)

on October 03, 2011
at 01:39 PM

When I lived in Japan I ate quite a bit of boiled taro at home. Loved it. Not that available near me in nyc

2870a69b9c0c0a19a919e54cb3a62137

(1520)

on October 03, 2011
at 01:11 PM

Careful with too much of that boar... http://www.spiegel.de/international/zeitgeist/0,1518,709345,00.html

2870a69b9c0c0a19a919e54cb3a62137

(1520)

on October 03, 2011
at 12:30 PM

At least you have good supplements and VAP tests.

Db4ad76f6f307a6f577e175710049172

(2297)

on October 03, 2011
at 12:26 PM

Dean - Freilandhaltung is pastured, at least from what I understand. And the yolks are bright orange, nice!

2870a69b9c0c0a19a919e54cb3a62137

(1520)

on October 03, 2011
at 12:20 PM

Which brands of eggs are really pastured in Germany? I think it's more than just Bodenhaltung/Bio.

Ec7cb2a7a68655954a01f03e95be1383

(1453)

on October 03, 2011
at 11:35 AM

do you have organic fruits and veggies in Namibia?

Medium avatar

(2169)

on October 02, 2011
at 11:15 PM

I'm from Raleigh. <3 the farmer's market! :)

Bdf98e5a57befa6f0877f978ba09871c

on October 02, 2011
at 02:50 AM

My family lives in New Hill, near Apex and Pittsboro. You?

6229cd9a7ca9882590259fae022e2647

(3209)

on October 01, 2011
at 10:57 PM

I am in the same situation.

6229cd9a7ca9882590259fae022e2647

(3209)

on October 01, 2011
at 10:56 PM

You must live in a far different part of NC than I do!

Ecc6aa6f4a961fbfce510bda4bd84916

(451)

on October 01, 2011
at 09:30 PM

Samoa sounds like it has amazing food! I love taro but it is harder to find here.

A994080d499afca98cdc9de896701ebd

(1281)

on October 01, 2011
at 08:38 PM

vegan places are quite popular in berlin too. Next to one is my favourite restaurant and I always wave at them; sitting on the patio with a huge chunk of meat on my plate. They would wave back, I'm sure, but they are too weak to lift their arms.

B0fe7b5a9a197cd293978150cbd9055f

(8938)

on October 01, 2011
at 04:01 PM

Belgium is a bit like Germany then, though grass-fed beef is so hard to find.

1a98a40ba8ffdc5aa28d1324d01c6c9f

(20378)

on October 01, 2011
at 03:35 PM

Sounds Awesome!!!

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19 Answers

6
Ed71ab1c75c6a9bd217a599db0a3e117

(25477)

on October 01, 2011
at 10:18 PM

NOTHING

There is a small pocket of people in my country who get it.

The politicians and business community dont.

Medical docs dont even know what paleo is.

Paleo in my country is an island of sense in a land of ignorance.

6229cd9a7ca9882590259fae022e2647

(3209)

on October 01, 2011
at 10:57 PM

I am in the same situation.

2870a69b9c0c0a19a919e54cb3a62137

(1520)

on October 03, 2011
at 12:30 PM

At least you have good supplements and VAP tests.

5
99b3af1a294f485ed881e1278629a571

(50)

on October 01, 2011
at 07:15 PM

In Samoa where I come frOm we eat little or no processed food. Lots of fresh seafood, taro (our version of potato), our beef, chicken and pork is all free range and lots and lots of coconut! Coconut cream, coconut oil, coconut milk, coconut juice all fresh :)

667f6c030b0245d71d8ef50c72b097dc

(15976)

on October 03, 2011
at 01:39 PM

When I lived in Japan I ate quite a bit of boiled taro at home. Loved it. Not that available near me in nyc

Ecc6aa6f4a961fbfce510bda4bd84916

(451)

on October 01, 2011
at 09:30 PM

Samoa sounds like it has amazing food! I love taro but it is harder to find here.

4
1a98a40ba8ffdc5aa28d1324d01c6c9f

(20378)

on October 01, 2011
at 03:36 PM

I live in Seattle, WA USA. I love the fresh wild salmon and the local co-op grocers and farmer markets.

4
Ecc6aa6f4a961fbfce510bda4bd84916

(451)

on October 01, 2011
at 03:12 PM

It's a mix in Vancouver. The local food movement is big, but so is the vegan/lowfat thing. I find it very tricky to go out for food. I've gotten ill almost every time I've tried so I don't anymore.

There are great asian markets so local produce and good quality coconut milk is in abundance and there are lots of really good albeit expensive butchers.

I think the most paleo thing about Vancouver is how outdoorsy people are. We walk everywhere because it is so beautiful here, we hike and play by the ocean. BC has the lowest obesity rates of anywhere in Canada (Canada is about on par with the US as far as obesity goes).

A994080d499afca98cdc9de896701ebd

(1281)

on October 01, 2011
at 08:38 PM

vegan places are quite popular in berlin too. Next to one is my favourite restaurant and I always wave at them; sitting on the patio with a huge chunk of meat on my plate. They would wave back, I'm sure, but they are too weak to lift their arms.

3
Bdf98e5a57befa6f0877f978ba09871c

on October 01, 2011
at 04:20 PM

Though I just moved to New York, my family lives on a farm in North Carolina. Going to the farmer's market for us is sort of expected. While we don't sell anything ourselves there yet, there is a great sense in community with people growing their own produce. It's also fairly easy to get organic and free-range eggs. Because of these communities, a lot of people I know tend to be 'locavores', i.e. they eat only local foods.

At local stores, there are also plenty of meat and fish options, organic and free-range. North Carolina being on the coast means that there is both fresh ocean fish and other meat sources, like cows.

The towns around my area in NC are also very environmentally conscious, and support things like alternative medicine. There's also a lot of good parks and trails. All in all, while most people don't eat strictly paleo, I find that it's an area very amenable to many aspects of the Paleo lifestyle.

6229cd9a7ca9882590259fae022e2647

(3209)

on October 01, 2011
at 10:56 PM

You must live in a far different part of NC than I do!

Medium avatar

(2169)

on October 02, 2011
at 11:15 PM

I'm from Raleigh. <3 the farmer's market! :)

Bdf98e5a57befa6f0877f978ba09871c

on October 02, 2011
at 02:50 AM

My family lives in New Hill, near Apex and Pittsboro. You?

2
0c45fe3eb9575a12eb2a8f3ce244d673

(115)

on October 03, 2011
at 03:32 PM

Well, it's quite mixed here, in Hungary.

Paleo doctors, nutritionist: I know 2 specifically paleo doctors here (I'm one of the patients), they follow very strict paleo principles.

Paleo restaurants: I've stumbled across paleo restaurants in Budapest (though they're really expensive), many of them has delivery service.

Grass-fed, bio meat availability: carcase meat (bio, grass-fed) is ridiculously cheap in Hortob??gy, but elsewhere is rare and horribly expensive. Biomarkets in the capital usually open twice a week, but they're expensive and the supply is very poor for my taste. But to be fair, there are some well-known, trusted butcher everywhere with their own animals, where you can buy some quality stuff.

I don't know where to buy good fish.

I've found only one brand of pastured butter (Kerrygold).

Paleo literature and resources are quite rich, thanks to especially G??bor Szendi. In the capital there are regular paleo clubs and meetings, cooking competitions, I think the paleo community here is very popular and big - however, the anti-paleo propaganda is also very vociferous.

Organic stores: prices are high, and there aren't many. Although there's a new shopping community, an informal association (formed by a few enthusiastic, environmentally conscious customers) with organic, local products at good prices. There are tons of ethnic markets.

Pastured eggs: you can buy in some supermarkets or at Biomarkets.

You can buy pastured and raw milk everywhere.

Supplements market is huge.

All in all, the "paleo market" is not bad for my country's size and economic status but I'm not happy with the prices, the variety of products, and the grass-fed accessibility.

2
Ec7cb2a7a68655954a01f03e95be1383

on October 03, 2011
at 11:11 AM

Not that much in germany.

I agree that we still have some sort of traditional food stuff and that fat is rather liked than frowned upon.

Maybe I have to see the situation in the USA to admire that some people go to their local butchers, buy a lot of organic stuff and eat at restaurants serving local food.

But what's the reality? It's still a minority who favor restaurants with local, traditional foods. Even those local foods are still mostly cereal-based.

Well, getting grass-fed in germany is hard if you live in smaller towns. You also don't find any pastured eggs nor do we have duck eggs.

While you can get high quality food the majority of people in germany is eating crap.

Off course, it is great to see local, organic food on the rise in supermarkets and restaurants but you are still a freak if you eat always healthy.

What does "healthy" for germans mean?

For the majority buying the organic version of oreos, pasta, sweets, cookies, bread and bisquits with the good old soy (meat is bad off course) equals health. As a result you see some of those "organic" people in very bad mental and physical health, defending their lifestyle until their last gulp of bionade.

No one knows about paleo, and I mean litereally no one, besides those 2k health freaks. Blank faces if you are talking about this.

As a society, we are not going into a bright future regarding our environment and health. Veganism and Vegetarianism are on the rise and dominate the public discussion about sustainability and health.

However, what is positive about germany?

  • Despite those millions robots there is a relativily "big"* health community online talking about the importance healthy foods (whole, organic foods, the glycemid load, omega 3/6 proportions, sustainability, etc.) It is not that big like in the english speaking world but people begin to ask questions

  • You can get high quality local, organic produce, meat and fish in every big city

  • There's a butcher selling grass-fed meat in my city (Yeah!)

  • Older people are still cooking traditional and delicious foods, which is not always that healthy but better than crap and I love that we have traditions

  • You can get exactly one brand of pastured butter in germany (kerrygold)

  • Most local (conventional or organic) meat is pastured anyway, simply because we have pastures in abundance (Downside: You just don't know if you buy pastured or purely grain-fed organic or conventional meat)

  • you can get pastured milk everywhere, unfortunately only pasteurized. But buying raw milk at a farmer is no problem

  • people it raw ground pork with salt, pepper and onions as a traditional food on their bread

*with big I mean "it does at least exist"

Ec7cb2a7a68655954a01f03e95be1383

(1453)

on October 03, 2011
at 05:03 PM

You are right, I deleted it - it has nothing to do with this topic. However, you have to agree that most people, due to medical drugs, education,etc. live in a state of ignorance, regarding diet and other things...

A994080d499afca98cdc9de896701ebd

(1281)

on October 03, 2011
at 02:36 PM

But then again, of course Germany isn't the ultimate paleo country. I didn't want to make it better than it is. As is said, those are some POSITIVE thing I've witnessed. I could have ranted about all the vegans, believe me. For me, it's very easy to find sources that sell pastured meat and I see many people that focus on whole foods. It all depends on where you live, your social circle etc., I think.

Ec7cb2a7a68655954a01f03e95be1383

(1453)

on October 03, 2011
at 05:04 PM

I bet there are no more than 1-3 % of people focusing on whole foods... thats a sad minority.. :/

A994080d499afca98cdc9de896701ebd

(1281)

on October 03, 2011
at 02:23 PM

wow, ok. That last sentence sounds quite ignorant, don't you think? May I know where you live in Germany? I've lived in Bayern (in Murnau, close to Munich), Cologne and Berlin.) Of course I can only speak for those regions.

A727956fa3f943057c4edb08ad9e864e

(4183)

on October 05, 2011
at 09:49 PM

Two things, leberwurst and blutwurst.. om nom nom..

006f2e9b763058ff2332681c206563e4

(252)

on June 05, 2014
at 03:02 PM

where are you from Promordial? Can't find grass fed meat ANYWHERE here :(

2
8c5533ffe71bd4262fedc7e898ead1ba

on October 03, 2011
at 10:19 AM

I can get grass-fed beef at a fraction of the cost of supermarket beef, because it's the cheap way to raise cows if you're poor. Same with local fruit & veg, though the choices there are extremely limited.

People only think it's weird that I walk around barefoot 'cause I'm white (and therefore, by definition, should be rich--too rich to be walking in the first place).

It is very easy to avoid fast food, junk food, etc. There's only 1 fast food joint in town, no vending machines, not even any food that doesn't require a 20 minute walk from my office to town.

That being said, Namibia is halfway developed and halfway undeveloped, particularly in the domain of nutrition/health which means everyone LOVES processed food. They wrap fruits & vegetables in styrofoam & plastic in the supermarkets. Nobody raises chickens or eggs to bring to market. . .

Ec7cb2a7a68655954a01f03e95be1383

(1453)

on October 03, 2011
at 11:35 AM

do you have organic fruits and veggies in Namibia?

8c5533ffe71bd4262fedc7e898ead1ba

(1724)

on October 04, 2011
at 01:00 PM

Maybe a very few things "certified" (there's a nascent organization), but poor people can't afford fertilizer, so most stuff in the market is basically organic. Only problem is all they have are greens, tomatoes and onions.

2
9bc6db67ba5b252a43340e4fba42b16b

on October 02, 2011
at 12:29 PM

I find it tough in the UK, especially given the economy at the moment.

Where I live, the closest you can get to organic produce is the chain supermarkets, this may differ in other areas, however the selection and price is shocking, creativity in the kitchen is a must! Very time consuming!

Spending money sucks, spear please!

2
306905a32e76b5c0764a663ea7e88426

(1072)

on October 02, 2011
at 07:01 AM

Even if you ditch the notion of "paleo", I was brought up on "meat and two veg", the full English breakfast, the "go to to work on an egg" campaign and Sunday roasts. So not too bad. :)

Alas these days, with more and more children [and parents] being unable to cook for themselves, the landscape of the UK's heal this shifting towards that of mainstream America's.

1
A727956fa3f943057c4edb08ad9e864e

on October 05, 2011
at 09:57 PM

I grew up an hour's drive from Kerrygold country (Co. Clare, Ireland). Drank raw milk as a kid. All of our beef is virtually grassfed (still finished on grain). Divine local cheese (if you're into that sort of thing).

Downsides: Irish people adore white bread. White flour was a total luxury 50 years ago so we're gone pretty nuts on it since. People don't seem to care about the quality of food, only price it seems.

Vegetable selection is limited to leafy and root veg. Tomatoes, avocadoes and peppers are mostly imported.

Crappy processed food abounds!

1
Medium avatar

on October 05, 2011
at 06:48 PM

The US is so diverse, but I can tell you about North Carolina-

  • Barbecue (a noun, not a verb) is world famous. Here, Barbecue refers to a hog that has been smoked and roasted for a long time over low heat to produce fall off the bone, tender meat. The way it is seasoned is determined by where you are in NC. We even have several different types within North Carolina. There is "western style" and "eastern style" In the east, the meat is chopped and then there is a spicy pepper and vinegar liquid (not sauce) you pour over the meat for more kick and juice. In the west, the meat is chopped or sliced, and laden in a very thin, sweeter, vinegar and tomato sauce.
  • pig pickin's- growing up here, anytime there was a wedding, funeral, birth or any other important event, we had a pig pickin. You go pick out a whole hog, put it on a giant grill/roaster thing, roast it for hours, and then line up with a plate to pick off the meat
  • collard greens
  • Hunting is HUGE here, especially in more rural areas. Hunting turkey, deer and duck is very common, and people also hunt bear and wild boar (which you can hunt with a crossbow!)
  • meat & 3 - a common meal at a restaurant- a meat and 3 veggies
  • pickled pig feet is available at many grocery stores
  • with the ocean and the vast inland seas called sounds, we have a thriving seafood industry: sea scallops, bay scallops, oysters, clams, flounder, grouper, spanish mackerel etc.

  • 1
    386dde6de2e7f33429e9a0ac1ba8ce42

    (263)

    on October 03, 2011
    at 03:26 PM

    While Mexico isn't really "my" country - I have only been living here for six months and am heading back to Canada in a few days - the town where I live here is definitely paleo-friendly.

    While most people eat (soaked, prepared) corn products and the market has a huge bakery section, they are easy enough to avoid. The beef is all grass fed - if you have too much grass, borrow a few of the neighbour's cows! - and the vegetables are all organic. Natural pesticides are easily made from other organically grown herbs. Chickens are fed calendula flowers and "pastured" (usually in the front yard) to rummage for bugs. Raw milk is delivered to the house (it's still mostly illegal in Canada). The markets are huge, easy to get to by bus, full of delicious hand-made and home-made items, and not just food.

    1
    0e2772604bdb3627525b42d77340538b

    on October 03, 2011
    at 01:19 PM

    I live in Atl, and paleo food isn't hard to come by. Of course, you could end up paying a lot for it if you're not careful.

    Several restaurants have started Paleo nights, or have paleo dishes on the menu full-time.

    Of course, my doctor told me to eat low-fat food in order to get my just a smidge over 100 LDL down (no comments on my high HDL or very low TG). So, there's that.

    1
    24fcc21452ebe39c032be6801d6bbadd

    (9812)

    on October 03, 2011
    at 12:52 PM

    I live in Southern MD; we have Amish and Mennonite folks here that sell grassfed beef and $3/gal illegal raw milk, and farmer's markets are really catching on. We have a few yuppie transplants who have taken up organic farming, which is fantastic. Most people here don't know about paleo, but the foods are abundant if you know where to look.

    1
    Db4ad76f6f307a6f577e175710049172

    on October 03, 2011
    at 12:40 PM

    I've recently moved to Germany, and I say that it's not that bad here.

    At the major supermarkets (I was in Kaufland, it's like Walmart I suppose) you can find pig feet, chicken hearts and stomachs, beef and pig liver, beef heart, and ox tail. Don't know if it's grain fed, but like Primordial said, most of the beef here sees a good amount of pasture, just because there's a lot of it around.

    I'm also really excited about eating liverwurst, blutwurst and zungenwurst (tounge sausage). A great way to get your organ meats, I just worry about the nitrates.

    I managed to pick up some Kerrygold at Edeka, a small grocery store, in a small town. That would be unheard of in the US. "Freilandhaltung" (pastured - I think) eggs are almost always available, which I've been eating with great enthusiasm. Their yolks are bright orange, like pureed carrots, so they must be pastured, or the Germans know how to supplement their layers to get nice yolks. I'm betting on the former.

    I'm also on the verge of finding a Wild Boar supplier where I live, I just have to search the farmer's markets I'm told. Definitely excited about making wild game a large part of my diet.

    Granted there's no perfect "Paleoland," I'd say some areas of the US and Germany are livable. Anyway, I'd say that part of being Paleo is being able to adapt yourself to your surrounds. Grass-fed beef need not be a staple, you can always find some other meat source.

    Db4ad76f6f307a6f577e175710049172

    (2297)

    on October 03, 2011
    at 02:52 PM

    Primordial and annamalia - any idea where I can get Demeter products? Which are the good stores for this kind of stuff. Is the stuff from Kaufland acceptable?

    Ec7cb2a7a68655954a01f03e95be1383

    (1453)

    on October 03, 2011
    at 01:47 PM

    Freilandhaltung is often better but its to a great part grain fed. It doesn't mean pastured but "the chicken can run outside on pasture, eat worms and grass but live heavily on grains". Demeter-Eggs come the nearest to pastured.

    2870a69b9c0c0a19a919e54cb3a62137

    (1520)

    on October 03, 2011
    at 01:11 PM

    Careful with too much of that boar... http://www.spiegel.de/international/zeitgeist/0,1518,709345,00.html

    A994080d499afca98cdc9de896701ebd

    (1281)

    on October 03, 2011
    at 02:28 PM

    For people who live close to Berlin and in Brandenburg, check out this: http://www.bio-berlin-brandenburg.de/fileadmin/Downloads/EKF_2011/EKF2011.pdf I buy meat from Melchhof, their beef and lamb is pastured.I've been there, they are so nice! there are also many farmers where you can buy eggs from. many supply stores in the city too. after some research I've finally found the perfect sources for everything I need :)

    A994080d499afca98cdc9de896701ebd

    (1281)

    on October 03, 2011
    at 04:50 PM

    http://www.demeter.de/ebenenangleichung/zielgruppe/schnittmengen/geniessen/demeter-aktiv-partner/?F=&MP=10-1488 this might help you! all in all, demeter (especially produce) should be available in many organic stores like alnatura, naturata etc. you can buy directly from a demeter farm too!

    Ec7cb2a7a68655954a01f03e95be1383

    (1453)

    on October 03, 2011
    at 01:47 PM

    Welcome in Germany! Hope you'll have a great time. Freilandhaltung is often better but its to a great part grain fed. It doesn't mean pastured but "the chicken can run outside on pasture, eat worms and grass but live heavily on grains". Demeter-Eggs come the nearest to pastured.

    0
    F49ccf45d8c42baf204a66410e35be67

    on June 05, 2014
    at 06:15 AM

    I have a question about german eggs, how do you know which ones are pastured? The ones that say Bio? I don't trust labels, so please erklären :)

    I come from Panama, and there I love:

    Ceviche: fresh fish eaten raw with lemon

    Plantains: goodness with all meals—except you need to be careful not to get them fried with crappy oils. I like them boiled in water, actually.

    Sweet Potatoes are cheap.

    0
    9ffe43c6c5990ed710c7c49b12d6ee7f

    on October 06, 2011
    at 01:37 AM

    In China, it's hard to know what you're getting. At a lot of markets, they'll lie about being the farmer when in fact they've been given some government-subsidized produce from somewhere else that they've unwrapped to sell. This would be different outside of the city though, as China is still mostly villages. But it's always imperative you wash everything well and sometimes even remove peels to avoid chemicals and pesticides (laws on those are pretty lax here).

    Nonetheless, selection is great, and people are big on eating seasonal produce. Seasonal fruits are often gifted by the bagful.

    It's impossible to find grass-fed beef, as Chinese consumers don't care yet how their meat has been processed, so those types of things aren't even labelled. BUT I've gotten pastured lamb from Mongolia, and it's soo delicious.

    Also easy to get good Thai coconut products.

    It's nice to never have to go to an Asian market for anything (like I would have to in the States), since stuff like seaweed is at any store.

    I can eat paleo at a friend's house or a Chinese restaurant due to family style serving. I just take some meat and veggies (though they are cooked with lots of vegetable oil and corn starch...), and don't help myself to the rice or noodles or steamed buns.

    0
    357a20e8c56e69d6f9734d23ef9517e8

    on October 02, 2011
    at 04:23 AM

    I'm American. Everything is pale about America because we're all about being the best. What's more paleo than that?

    5d5732f693afb35fa8755b032e75b6d6

    on October 06, 2011
    at 07:21 PM

    Also, are you being sarcastic or conceited?

    5d5732f693afb35fa8755b032e75b6d6

    on October 06, 2011
    at 07:19 PM

    ??? Pale? Do not understand this.

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