1

votes

What are the paleo peer reviewed studies?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created April 08, 2012 at 11:33 PM

Can you tell me Paleo peer reviewed studies?

A968087cc1dd66d480749c02e4619ef4

(20436)

on April 09, 2012
at 02:29 PM

Google either 'google scholar' or 'pubmed', then search on 'paleo'. Sheesh, do I have to do everything around here? And another thing: Pick up these clothes and put your dirty dishes in the dishwasher!

78cb3c4f70de5db2adb52b6b9671894b

(5519)

on April 09, 2012
at 12:26 AM

I should add that I do believe that the paleo way of living IS better than standard diets. However, I think we should be cautious when interpreting research studies (don't just read the abstract) and read with caution before leaping to any conclusions.

  • A91076800d4b3df907d7864d37ac9d43

    asked by

    (13)
  • Views
    2.3K
  • Last Activity
    1431D AGO
Frontpage book

Get FREE instant access to our Paleo For Beginners Guide & 15 FREE Recipes!

3 Answers

2
78cb3c4f70de5db2adb52b6b9671894b

on April 09, 2012
at 12:14 AM

What are you looking for in these studies? Are you trying to see if eating paleo is going to increase your lifespan, improve athletic performance, or what?

I think it would be too difficult to have a pure "paleo" study and make a big deal out of it...because from the looks of it here, very few are rigid in their intake. Thus, any study might not be relevant for us unless we follow the protocol in the study. If a "pure" paleo study came out, I bet the majority of people here wouldn't be able to claim that they are mirroring the study since I see a lot of people consuming dairy, dabbling in rice, and being 70-80% paleo. Meaning, is there external validity?

I think diets on study can rarely draw strong conclusions unless various factors are controlled. A simple "let's see if veganism is healthful" would be useless unless it studied the make-up of the food. The lax term "vegan" can be very unhealthful if a lot of sugar is consumed. However, it might be more useful to compare different forms of veganism, such as high fat, high carb, whole foods vs. processed etc. The same goes for paleo. Some of us eat high-fat, others eat low-modrate fat. If a study came out, how would we interpret it? The results of the study might be due to the make-up of the macronutrients, rather than the foods itself.

So for instance, if there was a study on "paleo" what would that even look like? Would it be no grains, legumes and dairy? Or will the study be flexible and just about whole foods because apparently, that's what people tend to do here? If it's just about whole foods, then can it really even be called paleo? Would it even be useful at all since the so-called study would be eliminating foods that people here consume?

In my opinion, paleo is too diverse in the "real world"...if there is a study out that that says "paleo is AWESOME" how do we know what variations of it (e.g. low-carb, high-fat, low-fat, starches included, starches limited, fruit okay, fruit not okay) have the "optimal" benefits? If a study came out claiming that "paleo increases lifespan" BUT the participants ate moderate-carb, not reading the study thoroughly might make someone on VLC say, "SEE?! I'm doing what's right to make me live until 100."

If there is a study on paleo, I'd like to see it with the following groups compared using an ANCOVA (an analysis comparing groups with covariates):

  1. Carb variation taken into account with low, moderate and high groups
  2. Protein type taken into account (e.g red meat, CAFO meat consumption, mostly fish)
  3. Fat intake taken into account
  4. Age and sex

Another thing to consider is what OUTCOMES you are looking for? Are you interested in preventing illness? Effective weight loss?

Basically, a simple "paleo" study means absolutely nothing if you don't take into context...it all depends on what you are interested in.

78cb3c4f70de5db2adb52b6b9671894b

(5519)

on April 09, 2012
at 12:26 AM

I should add that I do believe that the paleo way of living IS better than standard diets. However, I think we should be cautious when interpreting research studies (don't just read the abstract) and read with caution before leaping to any conclusions.

Answer Question


Get FREE instant access to our
Paleo For Beginners Guide & 15 FREE Recipes!