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Is Jicama Paleo

Answered on September 12, 2014
Created May 20, 2010 at 5:41 AM

I think it is similar to a carrot, or a beetroot. I don't know if it is still 'Paleo'. Any ideas? I found nothing in the Paleo Diet about Jicama.

5841391284e7af8c495c54bd90d3a795

(2764)

on April 11, 2012
at 03:31 PM

Yep, I know. I'm talking about the stuff that doesn't even *need* cooking.

1d0497f8781845ab371b479455bfee8e

(11157)

on April 11, 2012
at 02:22 PM

You know, humans have been cooking food for millennia. Our optimal diet is not limited to foods which can only be eaten in their raw state.

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on May 24, 2010
at 10:03 PM

Notice the actual post is split into two sections: technical and non-technical. On a technical, scientific level, jicima is absolutely 100% not paleo as it evolved in an area that paleolithic man did not inhabit, and humans did not exist in until the neolithic era. I don't know what else to tell you. Native Americans are not paleolithic people. They are neolithic people, and thus do not define the paleo diet. I am not saying "no one should eat it ever". I am simply saying it is **factually** not paleo.

D5780719a9f6fe0bb66ad0eb1ebfa582

on May 24, 2010
at 07:13 PM

Even still, that doesn't mean that anything indigenous to this continent is off-limits. Factual, or not, it doesn't hold water in the question about jicama, only the fact that is relevant is that it is a tuber. And you're really not one to talk about anyone being aggressive, Aaron.

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on May 24, 2010
at 07:05 PM

No need to get passive-aggressive about it, Karina. I am giving you facts. Paleolithic man did not live on this continent. Neolithic men did, but this is not the Neo-diet, it's the Paleo-diet.

D5780719a9f6fe0bb66ad0eb1ebfa582

on May 23, 2010
at 04:37 PM

Well, here's the new list of fruits to take out of your diet. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_culinary_fruits#Fruits_of_North_American_origin As they are indigenous to North America. No more pecans!

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on May 21, 2010
at 07:32 PM

I do not know enough if jicama botany beyond the fact that it is a tuber, and is thus the reproductive part of the plant.

D5cde8031564f905260ce9aa7a1f5e2c

(1160)

on May 21, 2010
at 04:39 PM

Can you point to any anti-nutrients in jicama?

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on May 21, 2010
at 04:09 PM

And for the record, even Native Americans didn't evolve with these foods. Humans are 300000+ years old. That is how long evolution takes. Not 15000 years.

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on May 21, 2010
at 04:08 PM

It is absolutely "new world", considering we only made it to North America around 15000 years ago. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Human_migration.png

D5780719a9f6fe0bb66ad0eb1ebfa582

on May 21, 2010
at 02:34 PM

The term "new-world" is very euro-centric. My ancestors, as I am 1/4 American Indian, are indigenous to Americas so I guess that technically does mean that we evolved symbiotically. But perhaps you have a point with the fact that its a tuber.

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7 Answers

6
5841391284e7af8c495c54bd90d3a795

(2764)

on May 20, 2010
at 05:57 AM

I figure that, lacking specific knowledge of why it wouldn't be paleo, if you can dig it up with with a stick and eat it raw safely (not poisonous) - go for it! (Not that you have to dig it up yourself - just that you could.)

5841391284e7af8c495c54bd90d3a795

(2764)

on April 11, 2012
at 03:31 PM

Yep, I know. I'm talking about the stuff that doesn't even *need* cooking.

1d0497f8781845ab371b479455bfee8e

(11157)

on April 11, 2012
at 02:22 PM

You know, humans have been cooking food for millennia. Our optimal diet is not limited to foods which can only be eaten in their raw state.

5
52cae90a114ca8f0404948e2b7ccb7ef

(1595)

on May 20, 2010
at 01:48 PM

Jicama is a good source of the prebiotic inulin.

http://www.marksdailyapple.com/prebiotics/

See also:

http://www.marksdailyapple.com/low-carb-jicama/

3
9d43f6873107e17ca4d1a5055aa7a2ad

on May 20, 2010
at 12:57 PM

It was discussed on the active low-carbers forum. Orthodox paleos said no since it's a tubers, but others said that paleo man probably did eat tubers and there was no evidence jicama was bad anyway.

My opinion: not that nutritious, but I sometimes like to make jicama fries.

2
3f5bbb444498a24f1a9720d75fa7c903

on May 21, 2010
at 01:07 AM

Potatoes are angiosperms that most certainly do flower and will occasionally produce a seed pod. They do asexually reproduce by stem tubers however. A stem tuber is a stem which asexually produces an enlarged portion of stem which stores food. Those enlarged portions (potatoes) will asexually produce more stems above and below ground.

Sweet potatoes are also angiosperms that asexually reproduce by root tubers (not stem). They will also produce flowers.

Jicama also flowers and produces root tubers similar to sweet potatoes.

All plants protect their reproductive parts - grains are a good example and they are certainly seeds.

I think that all of these are a matter of personal response to the stored starches in the tubers and whether you are "orthodox" paleo.

1
02080f1c3e9e841770ed6abbfa40801a

on April 11, 2012
at 04:23 AM

Jicama is categorized as a legume and would thus be off limits.

http://www.botgard.ucla.edu/html/botanytextbooks/economicbotany/Pachyrhizus/index.html

1
77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on May 20, 2010
at 08:30 PM

Technically:

No. Jicama has two strikes against it.

  • It is a new world food, indigenous to the Americas. What this implies is that we didn't even have exposure to it until 10000 years or so ago (the same time span as agriculture) and thus, could not have evolved in symbiosis with the food.
  • It is a tuber. There is a big difference between a root vegetable (carrot, turnip) and a tuber (potato, yam). A root vegetable is actually an energy store for the plant, which reproduces in other ways (carrots, for instance, flower). A tuber, by contrast, is the reproductive part of a plant. The plant does not flower, sprout taproots, or grow fruit. The only way it reproduces is by tubing through the ground and sprouting more plants. Plants will protect their reproductive organs - in the case of tubers, through chemicals and anti-nutrients.

Non-technically:

Stay away from tubers unless you're doing endurance sports. Cyclists, runners, climbers, etc will benefit from some tuber consumption.

D5cde8031564f905260ce9aa7a1f5e2c

(1160)

on May 21, 2010
at 04:39 PM

Can you point to any anti-nutrients in jicama?

D5780719a9f6fe0bb66ad0eb1ebfa582

on May 23, 2010
at 04:37 PM

Well, here's the new list of fruits to take out of your diet. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_culinary_fruits#Fruits_of_North_American_origin As they are indigenous to North America. No more pecans!

D5780719a9f6fe0bb66ad0eb1ebfa582

on May 21, 2010
at 02:34 PM

The term "new-world" is very euro-centric. My ancestors, as I am 1/4 American Indian, are indigenous to Americas so I guess that technically does mean that we evolved symbiotically. But perhaps you have a point with the fact that its a tuber.

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on May 21, 2010
at 04:09 PM

And for the record, even Native Americans didn't evolve with these foods. Humans are 300000+ years old. That is how long evolution takes. Not 15000 years.

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on May 21, 2010
at 07:32 PM

I do not know enough if jicama botany beyond the fact that it is a tuber, and is thus the reproductive part of the plant.

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on May 21, 2010
at 04:08 PM

It is absolutely "new world", considering we only made it to North America around 15000 years ago. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Human_migration.png

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on May 24, 2010
at 07:05 PM

No need to get passive-aggressive about it, Karina. I am giving you facts. Paleolithic man did not live on this continent. Neolithic men did, but this is not the Neo-diet, it's the Paleo-diet.

D5780719a9f6fe0bb66ad0eb1ebfa582

on May 24, 2010
at 07:13 PM

Even still, that doesn't mean that anything indigenous to this continent is off-limits. Factual, or not, it doesn't hold water in the question about jicama, only the fact that is relevant is that it is a tuber. And you're really not one to talk about anyone being aggressive, Aaron.

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on May 24, 2010
at 10:03 PM

Notice the actual post is split into two sections: technical and non-technical. On a technical, scientific level, jicima is absolutely 100% not paleo as it evolved in an area that paleolithic man did not inhabit, and humans did not exist in until the neolithic era. I don't know what else to tell you. Native Americans are not paleolithic people. They are neolithic people, and thus do not define the paleo diet. I am not saying "no one should eat it ever". I am simply saying it is **factually** not paleo.

0
9a6b1e35f94f1c66d9d2050a075e6cb3

on August 13, 2012
at 12:17 PM

Your pseudoscience nonsense is laughable.

Evolution did not suddenly stop in the Palaeolithic. Humans have continued to evolve since then --- just as we are still evolving today --- and the ability of many pastoralist groups (including white European-ancestry Americans such as yourselves) to digest lactose is an example of evolution in action.

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