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How do you fool yourself into eating certain foods?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created March 26, 2012 at 4:58 PM

I prefer to get my nutrients from natural foods, and avoid supplementing as much as possible. I would like to try to eat oysters mainly for the zinc (unless there is a better source) and for some other benefits that Ray Peat mentions.

I know that many people here like oysters, but the problem for me is that I'm not USED to eating them.

Anyone has gone through the same situation with any foods and how did you manage to not throw up? Any suggestions to make my experience as little traumatic as possible?

I'm not going to try them if I don't feel ready, but I'm wondering if anyone has any ideas that could make this a lot easier for me. I've seen some smoked and canned that I can buy at the supermarket, but I could go after raw ones too, if needed.

D4d83e7981ca572aaaa19fc620bb54f1

(467)

on September 07, 2013
at 01:28 AM

Oysters seem to have much more zinc (90 mg /100g). Besides, Ray Peat says that the amount of copper in them is important to balance the zinc.

F1b39d4f620876330312f4925bd51900

(4090)

on April 02, 2012
at 07:22 PM

Korion -that is so funny. The last time I forced myself to eat liver, I felt nauseated for days, and wouldn't eat beef for weeks. Ya, I am a bit neurotic.

B0fe7b5a9a197cd293978150cbd9055f

(8938)

on April 01, 2012
at 09:33 AM

Primal Toad, it's not that easy. The phytic acid has benefits (especially against iron absorption), and I doubt that more than 20% of the zinc will bind to it.

B0fe7b5a9a197cd293978150cbd9055f

(8938)

on April 01, 2012
at 09:30 AM

Hahaha I got used to liver, but it still smells like poo. At the start I just didn't chew it.

D4d83e7981ca572aaaa19fc620bb54f1

(467)

on March 27, 2012
at 11:47 PM

I don't know if I like them yet since I haven't tried them. It's the fact that they look weird to me that I'm trying to deal with... Wow, you drive 3 hours, they must taste good! :D

F1b39d4f620876330312f4925bd51900

(4090)

on March 27, 2012
at 10:25 PM

I think for me its about being fundamentally stubborn. If I "have to" eat it, then I dig in my heels and don't want to. I had never eaten a single oyster before this. I thought my first can was super good, not I am not so sure...stubborn...

D4d83e7981ca572aaaa19fc620bb54f1

(467)

on March 27, 2012
at 10:06 PM

Thanks Senneth, I think your tips will help me too! :) I really think it's a lot about what we are used to. I have no problems eating liver, and I can eat barbecued chicken hearts (which many people find disgusting) since I had them when I was a child. Now anything that comes in a shell... that's new to me. :(

D4d83e7981ca572aaaa19fc620bb54f1

(467)

on March 26, 2012
at 07:21 PM

That's a nice pizza experiment! I feel like baking a "hybrid" one, with coconut flour and cheese, but without flax. I wonder how that would turn out. Thanks for the link. :)

D4d83e7981ca572aaaa19fc620bb54f1

(467)

on March 26, 2012
at 06:05 PM

I certainly am not ready to slurp them back, lol Something about the shells too... Maybe a paste would make it easier. I guess by the time I reach the 42nd attempt, I will be more used to them :D Thanks, Jenny. :)

D4d83e7981ca572aaaa19fc620bb54f1

(467)

on March 26, 2012
at 05:58 PM

I'm certainly not ready to slurp them back, lol Something about the shells also... Maybe making a paste would make it easier. By the time I get to the 43rd attempt, I would probably have got used enough to them :D

65bba2aa1de77b31c373c1a390c43ca8

(423)

on March 26, 2012
at 05:47 PM

I've never seen the caned ones, and I'm not sure about smoked ones. When they're cooked, they look pretty much the same as when raw, except they are not as translucent or "slimy" looking

627cf3f5d1ddfb4c2f4c96169420f55f

(1626)

on March 26, 2012
at 05:37 PM

I wouldn't go with dark chocolate for your source of Zinc. The extremely high phytic acid contents binds to zinc and prevents its absorption. Same with pumpkin seeds. But, as you have stated, there are tons of great sources of zinc.

D4d83e7981ca572aaaa19fc620bb54f1

(467)

on March 26, 2012
at 05:36 PM

I actually don't know what they look like when cooked. I may have only seen them in pictures... Do cooked ones look better than smoked and canned ones?

D4d83e7981ca572aaaa19fc620bb54f1

(467)

on March 26, 2012
at 05:33 PM

For some reason it could be easier for me to try something new at a restaurant than at home. I don't know why. Thanks, Jen!

D4d83e7981ca572aaaa19fc620bb54f1

(467)

on March 26, 2012
at 05:29 PM

I like the bacon idea, thanks. :)

D4d83e7981ca572aaaa19fc620bb54f1

(467)

on March 26, 2012
at 05:28 PM

Hi April, I know I don't have to eat it, but I may be missing a great food if I don't. I would like to give it a try. Thanks for the list. Do you know how much is in oysters?

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8 Answers

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1
F1b39d4f620876330312f4925bd51900

(4090)

on March 27, 2012
at 09:08 PM

Pedrita - I eat oysters cause of Ray Peat (and my awesome consult with Danny Roddy). I half love them and half dread it. Yes my advice is a bit bizarre, but foods take a strange twist when you are eating them out of duty.

Here is my advice:

  1. Wait until you are starving before eating.

  2. Don't breathe through nose while opening and rinsing and getting the tin out to the recycle bin. For some reason the oil smell is really fishy, but once they are washed, I like em.

  3. Put the oysters in the smallest bowl you have. (That way it looks like less).

  4. Eat one at a time. Each tin has one oyster that will have a small piece of sand in it. Which is a recipe for gagging for me. If you eat one at a time, you can quickly spit this one out without wasting 4 or 5.

  5. Dip in homemade ranch or salsa or cream cheese with chives. The green salsa makes em go quick for me.

This all being said -nothing -could compel me to try eating liver again. and ray recommends that too. Its not going to happen.

D4d83e7981ca572aaaa19fc620bb54f1

(467)

on March 27, 2012
at 10:06 PM

Thanks Senneth, I think your tips will help me too! :) I really think it's a lot about what we are used to. I have no problems eating liver, and I can eat barbecued chicken hearts (which many people find disgusting) since I had them when I was a child. Now anything that comes in a shell... that's new to me. :(

F1b39d4f620876330312f4925bd51900

(4090)

on March 27, 2012
at 10:25 PM

I think for me its about being fundamentally stubborn. If I "have to" eat it, then I dig in my heels and don't want to. I had never eaten a single oyster before this. I thought my first can was super good, not I am not so sure...stubborn...

F1b39d4f620876330312f4925bd51900

(4090)

on April 02, 2012
at 07:22 PM

Korion -that is so funny. The last time I forced myself to eat liver, I felt nauseated for days, and wouldn't eat beef for weeks. Ya, I am a bit neurotic.

B0fe7b5a9a197cd293978150cbd9055f

(8938)

on April 01, 2012
at 09:30 AM

Hahaha I got used to liver, but it still smells like poo. At the start I just didn't chew it.

4
1bbcd2122d9c75b07440f22ef57d6448

(2934)

on March 26, 2012
at 05:02 PM

Bacon. Provided you're not adverse to that, too, it's excellent for masking less pleasant flavors. Alternately, you could find a nice marinara sauce recipe with lots of spices to balance the oystery flavor.

D4d83e7981ca572aaaa19fc620bb54f1

(467)

on March 26, 2012
at 05:29 PM

I like the bacon idea, thanks. :)

3
E55906cdb6839a23fd740ad85d160cc8

(1159)

on March 27, 2012
at 11:24 PM

If you don't like them, don't eat them. It's wasteful if there is no pleasure in it. Respecting your food is just as important as the nutritional value. Save them for the folks like me who drive 3 hours to sit down at a table with freshly shucked raw oysters. Respect yourself. Respect your food. Find something that really knocks your socks off.

D4d83e7981ca572aaaa19fc620bb54f1

(467)

on March 27, 2012
at 11:47 PM

I don't know if I like them yet since I haven't tried them. It's the fact that they look weird to me that I'm trying to deal with... Wow, you drive 3 hours, they must taste good! :D

2
65bf1ca7071028018c6d8305d0ddcd76

(3049)

on March 26, 2012
at 05:14 PM

I know this isn't always an option, but when I try something new I like to experience the best quality of the item, properly prepared first. For example, when I first tried raw oysters, I went to an oyster bar that focuses on them. They were fresh, delicious and the staff educated us on the types, possible preparations and accompaniments.

D4d83e7981ca572aaaa19fc620bb54f1

(467)

on March 26, 2012
at 05:33 PM

For some reason it could be easier for me to try something new at a restaurant than at home. I don't know why. Thanks, Jen!

2
Ed2157b3a5560af0f2c507c8fc4f5a2a

on March 26, 2012
at 05:06 PM

Oh man. Well, if you eat a little high quality cheese, that cauliflower pizza is AMAZING, and there is a hybrid version which is even closer, if this is your vice. Maybe stick to things you actually like!

http://stuffimakemyhusband.blogspot.com/p/great-pizza-experiment.html

Also, grass fed butter and delicious bacon always make things better, if you happen to be primal :)

D4d83e7981ca572aaaa19fc620bb54f1

(467)

on March 26, 2012
at 07:21 PM

That's a nice pizza experiment! I feel like baking a "hybrid" one, with coconut flour and cheese, but without flax. I wonder how that would turn out. Thanks for the link. :)

1
518bce04b12cd77741237e1f61075194

(11577)

on March 26, 2012
at 05:39 PM

Raw oysters are actually sometimes easier to eat than smoked/canned/cooked, because you just slurp back the raw ones! No chewing, plus some tasty vinaigrette or hot sauce all over. If you go to a restaurant and get them (go with an oyster-lover, or just someone who's oyster-curious so you can keep each other committed) you will get the benefit of not having to shuck the oysters yourself (usually a oh-my-god-Im-going-to-lose-all-my-fingers experience if you are doing it for the first time with a knife), some properly prepared sauces, and usually the advice or guidance of the wait staff (they're used to it- I used to work at a restaurant that served them, I would say 60-80% of patrons had never tried them before). If you do try fresh oysters, and don't care about eating them raw, skip the shucking and throw them on the BBQ. They pop open, so you don't even have to worry about when they're done or if you're over cooking them. I usually put a herb compound butter slice on top, then crumble some bacon, maybe toasted pine nuts as a treat. My mom does plain garlic butter, my boyfriend does finely chopped habenero and garlic. You could do a smorgasbord of different kinds of toppings to share with a friend, so at least you'll have fun even if you don't like it too much at first!

Alternatively, buy smoked oysters, wrap them with semi-cooked bacon, throw in the oven to heat and crisp, then eat. You can also make a seafood pate of shrimp, scallops, oysters, clams etc in a food processor, but that only works well (and tastes awesome) if you like seafood in general.

My strategy for trying to get a taste for new foods, is to try to make it not that big of a deal. I won't go out and buy a pound, then fret about having it in the fridge and needing to use it up before it goes bad. I will casually try and eat things that I know I don't like at parties or restaurants because I know that based exclusively on manners, I'm going to have to eat at least half of it. I used to hate olives- so I would try and casually just no-big-deal pop them in my mouth at parties. Besides a few gags and close-calls (note- don't employ this strategy on dates or work parties, don't want any surprises), it seems to work pretty well. Just try it a few times, in a few different ways, and then you can try and work up to including them in your diet.

I used to have this awesome customer that would come into my store, a really hilarious but strict mom of two boys who was a foodie, and she always said you can never say you don't like something until you've tried it 42 different ways. Unless you've tried it in 42 preparations and disliked it every time, you can't say you don't like a food. Her boys were so adorable, they would try things and then tell you "I don't like this particular preparation, but I look forward to trying it in a different way sometime". I thought this is such a great attitude, so I always keep this in mind when I'm trying new foods. Takes the pressure off of liking it every single time- maybe we'll hear back on how you life oysters after your 42nd time trying them!

D4d83e7981ca572aaaa19fc620bb54f1

(467)

on March 26, 2012
at 05:58 PM

I'm certainly not ready to slurp them back, lol Something about the shells also... Maybe making a paste would make it easier. By the time I get to the 43rd attempt, I would probably have got used enough to them :D

D4d83e7981ca572aaaa19fc620bb54f1

(467)

on March 26, 2012
at 06:05 PM

I certainly am not ready to slurp them back, lol Something about the shells too... Maybe a paste would make it easier. I guess by the time I reach the 42nd attempt, I will be more used to them :D Thanks, Jenny. :)

1
65bba2aa1de77b31c373c1a390c43ca8

(423)

on March 26, 2012
at 05:29 PM

My favorite way to eat (fresh) oysters is super lightly cooked. I have never been able to stomach the loogie-like texture of raw ones (eww!), but at home I like to put them on the grill just until they pop open. They raw texture is gone, but they still taste sweet and salty like the should.. YUM!

D4d83e7981ca572aaaa19fc620bb54f1

(467)

on March 26, 2012
at 05:36 PM

I actually don't know what they look like when cooked. I may have only seen them in pictures... Do cooked ones look better than smoked and canned ones?

65bba2aa1de77b31c373c1a390c43ca8

(423)

on March 26, 2012
at 05:47 PM

I've never seen the caned ones, and I'm not sure about smoked ones. When they're cooked, they look pretty much the same as when raw, except they are not as translucent or "slimy" looking

1
Medium avatar

(10663)

on March 26, 2012
at 05:21 PM

You don't have to eat something that you don't like just because you think it's good for you.

Other good sources of zinc:
-calf liver (4 oz has 12.73 mg)
-venison (4 oz has 9.8 mg)
-beef (4 oz has 5.95 mg)
-crab (3 oz has 7 mg)
-dark chocolate (100 g has 9.6 mg)
-lamb (4 oz has 4.6 mg)
-scallops (4 oz has 3.4 mg)
-sesame seeds (1/4 cup has 2.75 mg)
-pumpkin seeds (1/4 cup has 2.52 mg)
-turkey/chicken (4 oz has 1.79-2.9 mg)

627cf3f5d1ddfb4c2f4c96169420f55f

(1626)

on March 26, 2012
at 05:37 PM

I wouldn't go with dark chocolate for your source of Zinc. The extremely high phytic acid contents binds to zinc and prevents its absorption. Same with pumpkin seeds. But, as you have stated, there are tons of great sources of zinc.

D4d83e7981ca572aaaa19fc620bb54f1

(467)

on September 07, 2013
at 01:28 AM

Oysters seem to have much more zinc (90 mg /100g). Besides, Ray Peat says that the amount of copper in them is important to balance the zinc.

D4d83e7981ca572aaaa19fc620bb54f1

(467)

on March 26, 2012
at 05:28 PM

Hi April, I know I don't have to eat it, but I may be missing a great food if I don't. I would like to give it a try. Thanks for the list. Do you know how much is in oysters?

B0fe7b5a9a197cd293978150cbd9055f

(8938)

on April 01, 2012
at 09:33 AM

Primal Toad, it's not that easy. The phytic acid has benefits (especially against iron absorption), and I doubt that more than 20% of the zinc will bind to it.

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