8

votes

Have you been confronted about being orthorexic?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created April 18, 2011 at 3:26 PM

Has anyone had the "orthorexia discussion" with a family member or significant other? How did that go?

For those who have not familiar with Dr. Bratman's criteria/definition, you can take the quiz using the following link:

http://www.metroactive.com/papers/metro/08.02.01/eating3-0131.html

I had one full "yes" answer and one partial. Question 2 was a yes.

I include the question below, and my answer in italics, for your consideration. I'll let you guess which was my other partial yes answer...

Do you plan tomorrow's food today? Yes???people who don???t plan their meals ahead of time are the ones with an ???eating disorder,??? in my opinion. I have meat thawing for my meals throughout the week. If you don???t plan your meals you???re not well prepared, in my opinion. (???Tomorrow??? is pretty arbitrary. Most people don???t even plan as far ahead as dinner.) Not planning for future meals leads to waste more often than not. And it???s only in the last 100 years that we can afford the luxury of not knowing where our next meal is coming from. In that time obesity has skyrocketed, diabetes is common, we have conditions like ???acid reflux??? which is completely avoidable (it???s caused by eating grains) etc., etc. This is a very bad question, and calls into question the appropriateness and validity of this test.

Fd70d71f4f8195c3a098eda4fc817d4f

(8014)

on May 25, 2012
at 05:01 PM

And I'm sorry things have affected your husband to such a degree. Must be difficult for you to navigate. It does take time and effort to eat the way I do, but I wouldn't say I'm obsessed/orthorexic. I don't let my food preferences make me a shut-in.

Fd70d71f4f8195c3a098eda4fc817d4f

(8014)

on May 25, 2012
at 04:59 PM

I don't think anyone is saying orthorexia isn't a real thing. But I do think there's a world of difference between going out of your way to source, prepare, and eat foods you consider beneficial to your health, vs letting it take over your life to the point where you can't leave the house, visit with friends, attend a fun event, for fear that one piece of some "forbidden food" will make you keel over and die.

Fd70d71f4f8195c3a098eda4fc817d4f

(8014)

on May 25, 2012
at 04:51 PM

Right -- if you *didn't* plan ahead, that's when (at least, for a SAD eater), you head for the drive-thru! Pizza, bucket of chicken, Chinese = no forethought required.

Fd70d71f4f8195c3a098eda4fc817d4f

(8014)

on May 25, 2012
at 04:49 PM

AMEN!! ---> "How is it 'disordered' to put thought and effort into what you eat each day? Not thinking about food and nutrition at all is why so many people eat poorly and pay the long-term consequences!"

1144bcd270d99a61c2bc6a23f6290d46

(234)

on May 25, 2012
at 02:37 PM

I also used to work at an amazing restaurant, The Cafe, check it out if you ever go to Ames! Seasonally changing menu, using local whenever possible (fresh salad with everything fresh from garden's that morning, etc.) Everything made from scratch & very easy to accommodate paleo (or those icky vegans, etc too!). Reasonable prices to boot! Ahh, I miss it!

1144bcd270d99a61c2bc6a23f6290d46

(234)

on May 25, 2012
at 02:32 PM

I moved from Iowa to Houston, TX and really miss the local and organic. I found it MUCH easier to find things back in IA. Now, I have to drive 1/2hr in no traffic to go to the nearest Whole Foods, the nearest farmer's market is about an hour's drive & there don't even seem to be very many of them. ??? It's so strange to me, Houston is a city of 8 million or so people and Ames was 50,000 but had it's own coop, LOTS of local farmer's to support and I could buy a bunch of locally grown stuff at my local Hy-Vee all the time (frequently cheaper than mass produced to boot!).

77f83ec328459dce702216709762e202

(571)

on April 28, 2011
at 01:28 AM

I completely agree with the above post. I believe that othorexia exists and that it is a form of anorexia. The relief and increased self esteem stemming from "controlling" food and bodily functions as a result is textbook.

0bc6cbb653cdc5e82400f6da920f11eb

(19245)

on April 18, 2011
at 10:24 PM

You have my sympathies, food is tied up with so many important aspects of being human when your relationship with it becomes messed up it affects everything else.

7e746be2f0e550a8cd7df881322ae705

(18701)

on April 18, 2011
at 10:11 PM

I love your answers, Matthew! I really wish it was that easy for me. My problems with food go back much further than when I started Paleo.

Medium avatar

(5136)

on April 18, 2011
at 07:28 PM

yep, i can get raw milk and way cheaper grassfed beef here (but not year round, only when the farmer is butchering and i plan in advance) and only because i know a guy who knows a guy. forget about EVER eating out because you just can't. It's all garbage. It's a bummer to see they way people eat here and the state of health they are in. In the city, Whole Foods is ok, but the farmer's markets are great, frequent and convenient. Wish I could say the same here. I used to get raw milk in Chicago too, but again all under the radar.

531db50c958cf4d5605ee0c5ae8a57be

(8878)

on April 18, 2011
at 06:37 PM

RG73, I get your point but anyone who reads Steffanson knows that the Inuit, at least, most certainly did plan ahead for winter.

7e746be2f0e550a8cd7df881322ae705

(18701)

on April 18, 2011
at 06:00 PM

Shocking, Leah! ;)

E2b9c679315c7c9c7265783dde89f350

(1303)

on April 18, 2011
at 05:36 PM

Wow- that really is a bad question. I used to plan my week's meals a week ahead of time back when I was eating processed crap. Why? Because I have to do this thing called grocery shopping. And because cooking meat from frozen sucks.

66e6b190e62fb3bcf42d4c60801c7bf6

(12407)

on April 18, 2011
at 05:02 PM

whole foods is a great source for many things but i must say it's much easier for my coworker who lives in a rural section an hour and a half outside of dc to source things such as raw milk and cream, grassfed meat(not to mention the fact that the prices are much lower) and other things that a good paleo prizes

Medium avatar

(5136)

on April 18, 2011
at 04:58 PM

upvoted, though have just moved from an urban setting to a rural one, I would have to disagree there, in the city, you can source whatever you want easily, here you have to work and often travel to find it.

D67e7b481854b02110d5a5b21d6789b1

(4111)

on April 18, 2011
at 04:51 PM

I am with you! ;)

9f9fa49265e03ddd2bf2bba5477a556b

(3184)

on April 18, 2011
at 04:22 PM

Actually for most of human history we had no idea where our next meal was going to come from. That is the evolutionary norm. A hunter-gatherer couldn't really plan for tomorrow. They could set aside some nuts, or preserved meat/fat, but they didn't know if they'd be successful on a hunt tomorrow. They didn't know if they'd find tubers, greens, nuts, fruit on tomorrow's foraging walk. So I'd say it is only recently in our history that we've had the luxury of planning meals.

7e746be2f0e550a8cd7df881322ae705

(18701)

on April 18, 2011
at 04:01 PM

I love that peaceful sense of control when every thing is on a roll. I'm not going to feel bad for that.

7e746be2f0e550a8cd7df881322ae705

(18701)

on April 18, 2011
at 04:00 PM

Yeah, I can make excuses for myself for all of them. I figured I was better off being brutally honest with myself. I've also stopped looking down on the other people so much, but I still judge.

531db50c958cf4d5605ee0c5ae8a57be

(8878)

on April 18, 2011
at 03:59 PM

The "total self control" one also could mislead. Do I feel more in control? Yes. Peaceful sense of total control? Not really, although wine and tequila have been know to get me close...

531db50c958cf4d5605ee0c5ae8a57be

(8878)

on April 18, 2011
at 03:56 PM

Initially I answered yes to the self-esteem question but then I realized it wasn't self-esteem that increased so much as general health indicators. Positive self-esteem associated with body image also increased but that's an incidental side effect. Semantics?

7e746be2f0e550a8cd7df881322ae705

(18701)

on April 18, 2011
at 03:50 PM

I totally agree with your answer regarding planning food. I love a good plan.

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18 Answers

13
26b7615ef542394102785a67a2786867

on April 18, 2011
at 04:02 PM

Publicly consuming large amounts of fatty beef and heavy cream means I very rarely get accused of 'healthy eating'.

I actually do believe in the orthorexia (as a subset of anorexia) theory and have known several people who suffered with it, but in those cases they were starving their bodies because they had developed such a pathological fear of unhealthy foods/too much food - it was a facet of textbook anorexia nervosa. It deserves it's own definition though, IMO.

Eating a specific diet has nothing to do with orthorexia. It's an eating disorder involving starvation and severe health problems. Now, you can develop certain unhealthy/ED tendencies while eating a specific/strict diet, but that does not mean you are 'orthorexic'.

I took the quiz:

  1. I've never counted the hours I think about food. Not that many I don't think...
  2. I meal-plan often, like my mother and grandmother before me. We're poor, it's an important part of keeping to a budget.
  3. Yes - I've never had much emotional attachment to food and don't get overly excited about the taste of things.
  4. Eating well has improved every facet of my life.
  5. No, I've gotten more lax. I'm more of an 80/20 'paleo' eater these days.
  6. Yeah, I guess? A lot things taste good but I don't feel well physically after eating them...so I don't.
  7. Yes, I am extremely proud of myself for finally stepping up and taking excellent care of my body and my health. Used to neglect myself terribly and eat crap non-stop, and I paid for it with many health issues. I feel bad for people who neglect their health and eat badly, because I know what it's like to not be able to muster the motivation to care for yourself.
  8. Not at all. Sometimes I feel stomach pain though. ;)
  9. Kind of. I'm pretty flexible though.
  10. I guess I do feel a sense of peace when I know I am eating right and am going to feel good. Not that I have a panic attack when I eat pizza, but I get a sense of impending doom since I know I'm going to pay for it later.

According to this scale I am 'orthorexic'. I eat 3000+ calories, mostly of whole foods, every day. Utter bullshit. How is it 'disordered' to put thought and effort into what you eat each day? Not thinking about food and nutrition at all is why so many people eat poorly and pay the long-term consequences!

77f83ec328459dce702216709762e202

(571)

on April 28, 2011
at 01:28 AM

I completely agree with the above post. I believe that othorexia exists and that it is a form of anorexia. The relief and increased self esteem stemming from "controlling" food and bodily functions as a result is textbook.

Fd70d71f4f8195c3a098eda4fc817d4f

(8014)

on May 25, 2012
at 04:49 PM

AMEN!! ---> "How is it 'disordered' to put thought and effort into what you eat each day? Not thinking about food and nutrition at all is why so many people eat poorly and pay the long-term consequences!"

11
Fa9f340eddbad9a544184c688fa4dcdd

(6433)

on April 18, 2011
at 04:00 PM

If living Paleo means that SAD MDs classify me as "sick", then I don't want to be well (especially not their definition of "well").

Paleo has actually helped me to have a much healthier relationship with food - I'm more in touch with my appetite, I know when I'm hungry and am less likely to overeat, I'm enjoying new foods and new ways of cooking, I actually look forward to being hungry so that I can enjoy my food, I don't have to worry that I'll get that "sick" hunger particular to SAD.

Edit: I think that there are some fundamentally different ways of understanding food between SAD eaters and Paleo peeps which could explain this: for example the latter understand the damage that even a small amount of gluten can cause (and keep on causing weeks after the fact) whereas the former just see 300 extra calories of cake, and mistake commonsense self-preservation for some kind of psychiatric disorder. Quite frankly I wouldn't at all mind an indulgence like drinking 300 extra calories of heavy cream (in fact I'd rather enjoy it), but gluten? No thanks.

10
66e6b190e62fb3bcf42d4c60801c7bf6

on April 18, 2011
at 04:21 PM

orthorexic here. i think the fact that this survey and similar people making the case of orthorexia for those following a paleo or even generally healthy-eating lifestyle is that it's so damn hard to eat in western society without thinking about what you're putting in your mouth. i have to plan my meals because how can i eat out regularly when there is gluten and industrial oils permeating everything on the menu. reading what i've read over the last year has convinced me that the SAD is nothing short of slow poison. believing that kind of makes one hypersensitive about what they intake...

EDIT: it's particularly harder in urban settings from what i've experienced and heard anecdotally.

Medium avatar

(5136)

on April 18, 2011
at 04:58 PM

upvoted, though have just moved from an urban setting to a rural one, I would have to disagree there, in the city, you can source whatever you want easily, here you have to work and often travel to find it.

66e6b190e62fb3bcf42d4c60801c7bf6

(12407)

on April 18, 2011
at 05:02 PM

whole foods is a great source for many things but i must say it's much easier for my coworker who lives in a rural section an hour and a half outside of dc to source things such as raw milk and cream, grassfed meat(not to mention the fact that the prices are much lower) and other things that a good paleo prizes

Medium avatar

(5136)

on April 18, 2011
at 07:28 PM

yep, i can get raw milk and way cheaper grassfed beef here (but not year round, only when the farmer is butchering and i plan in advance) and only because i know a guy who knows a guy. forget about EVER eating out because you just can't. It's all garbage. It's a bummer to see they way people eat here and the state of health they are in. In the city, Whole Foods is ok, but the farmer's markets are great, frequent and convenient. Wish I could say the same here. I used to get raw milk in Chicago too, but again all under the radar.

1144bcd270d99a61c2bc6a23f6290d46

(234)

on May 25, 2012
at 02:32 PM

I moved from Iowa to Houston, TX and really miss the local and organic. I found it MUCH easier to find things back in IA. Now, I have to drive 1/2hr in no traffic to go to the nearest Whole Foods, the nearest farmer's market is about an hour's drive & there don't even seem to be very many of them. ??? It's so strange to me, Houston is a city of 8 million or so people and Ames was 50,000 but had it's own coop, LOTS of local farmer's to support and I could buy a bunch of locally grown stuff at my local Hy-Vee all the time (frequently cheaper than mass produced to boot!).

1144bcd270d99a61c2bc6a23f6290d46

(234)

on May 25, 2012
at 02:37 PM

I also used to work at an amazing restaurant, The Cafe, check it out if you ever go to Ames! Seasonally changing menu, using local whenever possible (fresh salad with everything fresh from garden's that morning, etc.) Everything made from scratch & very easy to accommodate paleo (or those icky vegans, etc too!). Reasonable prices to boot! Ahh, I miss it!

7
4a7929c2aa05bf11349d9e55cb542d47

on April 29, 2011
at 06:59 PM

This about the classes of people who would qualify as someone with a problem based on this quiz:

  • Anyone on a diet to lose or gain weight
  • Any vegetarian/vegan
  • Anyone managing food intolerances/allergies/reactions
  • Anyone who takes an active role in the food they eat

Basically, in order to not have a problem, you have to be indulgent and ignorant.

3
8f4ff12a53a98f3b5814cfe242de0daa

(1075)

on April 18, 2011
at 07:16 PM

My presumption is that orthorexia occurs where trying to eat healthy has serious negative repercussions on other aspects of your life. Spending hours and hours looking up nutritional information every day would certainly qualify. Or severely curtailing social life (ie become a shut in to only eat foods prepped the 1 way that you can feel they are acceptable).

I think this is probably a relatively common occurrence in any of the extreme (as defined by not including large food groups, ie grains, meat, fruit, fat) dietary circles.

The stress induced by trying to conform to "healthy eating" at a 100% level (or social isolation) probably does more damage than being more moderate with habits.

As an example of orthorexia: http://paleohacks.com/questions/33697/what-carbohydrates-to-eat-if-eliminating-fructose

Essentially a "not a single gram of fructose" fascination.

3
Eedf46c82d0356d1d46dda5f9782ef36

(4464)

on April 18, 2011
at 03:55 PM

heh. Apparently I have a "problem".

I'm not buying it.

2
Ae8946707ddebf0f0bfbcfc63276d823

(9402)

on May 25, 2012
at 03:29 PM

Based on this quiz, I would definitely be considered orthorexic. I would guess that most people who follow strict or somewhat strict paleo or primal would also be considered orthorexic, if they answered the quiz honestly. Is the quiz fair? I would say probably, yes. Does the way we eat make some elements of our lives more difficult, make social interaction more difficult, etc? In some to many cases, likely yes.

To me though, the issue is what is the alternative? Unfortunately, society/technology/"progress" has put us in a position where possibly the only way to be healthy is to be orthorexic. Just going with the flow doesn't work so well when the entire food system is damaged. I think this article address this point well:

http://napavalleyregister.com/lifestyles/food-and-cooking/columnists/stock-report/so-basically-everything-in-moderation-right/article_4ba28698-6ccb-11e1-95d0-001871e3ce6c.html

2
1144bcd270d99a61c2bc6a23f6290d46

on May 25, 2012
at 02:59 PM

I would be considered orthorexic. I don't care. I consider myself a foodie first before anything else diet related, one that has been trying to lose weight and cares about my health. I love food and I won't eat things that taste just ok. That means that while "dieting" to lose weight, I make sure to eat food that is nutrient dense, that tastes really good, and that makes me feel full...I don't do well going hungry. All of that takes major planning and preparation, as well as some research. I also can make a lot of stuff at home that tastes waaay better than restaurants and is cheaper and healthier for me.

I have spent a lot of time looking things up. I think most people have no idea how much they eat or what's in it or any idea of the relationship of what they eat and how it effects them. You just have to watch an episode of Biggest Loser when people say they didn't know a caesar salad with fried chicken isn't healthy.

I'm sure some people could take this to the extreme, just like anything else in life. I also think they probably know deep inside if they have a major problem? Most of us are fine here and better off for our efforts, but I hope those that need it get some therapy.

2
C1c86f42410cd4788bd9c5cf801dcd8f

(2246)

on April 29, 2011
at 11:07 AM

Do you feel great, show an increase in body composition can bend over and touch your toes or jump more then 2 inches off the ground?

-10 points.

2
Medium avatar

(5136)

on April 18, 2011
at 04:57 PM

huh. what a dumb quiz . I scored somewhere between 3.5-4.5.

Food could be considered a political issue these days. As more corporations rule the supermarket supply, there are so many ingredients that are simply harmful being put in a majority of food for the sake of profits. To me that's a little like a mugging. I don't have a problem with defending myself from people who want to harm me for my cash.

2
F087e79f7e8a76613c9b82528ab6dc3f

on April 18, 2011
at 04:09 PM

This seems like a test to bring about irresponsibility. As a mom of four, I had to plan a menu...at least a week in advance. Every hour one of the kids would ask what there was to eat. I had to make decisions about food constantly. It is a relief now to only have two people in the house.Salads and meat... I cook ahead so I can grab when rushed. Prepackage the salads and prepackage the meat in pyrex glass storage. Easy as (pie) So I can think LESS about food.

Fd70d71f4f8195c3a098eda4fc817d4f

(8014)

on May 25, 2012
at 04:51 PM

Right -- if you *didn't* plan ahead, that's when (at least, for a SAD eater), you head for the drive-thru! Pizza, bucket of chicken, Chinese = no forethought required.

2
7e746be2f0e550a8cd7df881322ae705

on April 18, 2011
at 03:50 PM

No one has confronted me, but my family thinks I'm nuts. They also KNOW I am healthier than I was when I was obese, so what can they really have to say?

I answered yes too many questions:

Do you plan tomorrow's food today?

Do you sacrifice experiences you once enjoyed to eat the food you believe is right?

Do you feel an increased sense of self-esteem when you are eating healthy food? Do you look down on others who don't?

Do you feel guilt or self-loathing when you stray from your diet?

When you are eating the way you are supposed to, do you feel a peaceful sense of total control?

I have reasons for all of them, of course. I am coming from an eating disordered background, though, so this does not shock me.

I will take orthorexia over binge eating any day.

7e746be2f0e550a8cd7df881322ae705

(18701)

on April 18, 2011
at 04:00 PM

Yeah, I can make excuses for myself for all of them. I figured I was better off being brutally honest with myself. I've also stopped looking down on the other people so much, but I still judge.

7e746be2f0e550a8cd7df881322ae705

(18701)

on April 18, 2011
at 04:01 PM

I love that peaceful sense of control when every thing is on a roll. I'm not going to feel bad for that.

D67e7b481854b02110d5a5b21d6789b1

(4111)

on April 18, 2011
at 04:51 PM

I am with you! ;)

531db50c958cf4d5605ee0c5ae8a57be

(8878)

on April 18, 2011
at 03:59 PM

The "total self control" one also could mislead. Do I feel more in control? Yes. Peaceful sense of total control? Not really, although wine and tequila have been know to get me close...

531db50c958cf4d5605ee0c5ae8a57be

(8878)

on April 18, 2011
at 03:56 PM

Initially I answered yes to the self-esteem question but then I realized it wasn't self-esteem that increased so much as general health indicators. Positive self-esteem associated with body image also increased but that's an incidental side effect. Semantics?

7e746be2f0e550a8cd7df881322ae705

(18701)

on April 18, 2011
at 06:00 PM

Shocking, Leah! ;)

1
A744c082d1b513b8ab23170f4a105b7e

on May 25, 2012
at 02:23 PM

I believe this is valid, as I am married to a man, that I believe has this disorder. It started out at "healthy" eating, I respected that decision and fully supported that. after almost 5 years of this, he has lost too much weight, is obsessed about what he eats and when he eats it and is almost completely anti social. When he started this, he had a home ran business, which was very successful, through the years the recesson and price of fuel, has forced him to work outside the home. He suffered with panic attacks at the thought of leaving the comfort of our home,and how and when he could eat his meals. We missed many activities due to his dietary restrictions.

People who eat vegetarian or vegan or even paleo do not fit into this... unless they become so obsessed that it affects their livelihood, which it has certainly done in my husbands case. Don't dismiss this as real just because you don't agree with it. it is real, I guarantee that it isn't the obsessed that are the most affected, but they do need to be taken seriously and helped. denial doesn't make it less real.

Fd70d71f4f8195c3a098eda4fc817d4f

(8014)

on May 25, 2012
at 05:01 PM

And I'm sorry things have affected your husband to such a degree. Must be difficult for you to navigate. It does take time and effort to eat the way I do, but I wouldn't say I'm obsessed/orthorexic. I don't let my food preferences make me a shut-in.

Fd70d71f4f8195c3a098eda4fc817d4f

(8014)

on May 25, 2012
at 04:59 PM

I don't think anyone is saying orthorexia isn't a real thing. But I do think there's a world of difference between going out of your way to source, prepare, and eat foods you consider beneficial to your health, vs letting it take over your life to the point where you can't leave the house, visit with friends, attend a fun event, for fear that one piece of some "forbidden food" will make you keel over and die.

1
Medium avatar

(3259)

on April 29, 2011
at 12:45 PM

Based on the questionnaire, I guess I have a "touch" of orthorexia, although I find these quizzes completely devoid of context. Of the questions I answered "yes" to, they came with much more complex explanations. Example:

Do you sacrifice experiences you once enjoyed to eat the food you believe is right?

Uh...yeah, but the sacrificed experience is getting mildly drunk on beer most evenings after work. Sure, I enjoyed it and giving it up was (I guess) a sacrifice, but it was unhealthy and caused more problems than it was worth. Ditto for the sugar binge that immediately followed beer and preceded sleep.

I will say, however, that my wife has raised the question in recent months about how much I sometimes obsess over the link between food and autoimmunity, although I don't think it's a case of orthorexia but rather some other psychological issue I have as a person with chronic pain (like-being-able-to-walkorexia?). When I'm eating well and feeling well, life is amazing. When inflammation and pain rears its ugly head, I tend to get hyper-focused on what I must have done "wrong" to cause the flare ("must have been that one sweet potato fry I ate off my daughter's plate last Wednesday..."). I need to be reminded that autoimmunity is a complex beast and that flares can be caused by any number of things, and can also be random events.

I think those of us that have successfully improved a serious and debilitating autoimmune condition with diet can be given a little slack for thinking a lot about the food we put in our bodies. If the links are real (and I believe they are), our sacrifices (beer, pizza, social acceptance) are not only for body composition and self-image (important), but can also mean the difference between vitality and disability.

1
0bc6cbb653cdc5e82400f6da920f11eb

(19245)

on April 18, 2011
at 10:08 PM

Firstly, this is just a ten question online quiz, it is unlikely to stand up to in depth critisism. Also orthorexia is just a descriptive term not an illness. Probably best not to take it too seriously.

Orthorexia is meant to describe people for whom an obsession with healhty eating has negativly affected other aspects of their lives.

However,

Do you spend more than three hours a day thinking about healthy food?

Nope, although I do love my food and find it endlessly facinating :)

Do you plan tomorrow's food today?

Rarely that organised. I think some have misinterpreted this question, planning ahead is normal and this question needs to be in context with the other questions. For example: Planning ahead to be organised, saving money and use your food efficiently is good. Stressing over the minute details of tomorrow's food out of fear of slipping up and eating something unvirtuous is bad.

Do you care more about the virtue of what you eat than the pleasure you receive from eating it?

No. Both play a role but I'm not eating food I don't like just because it is virtuous.

Have you found that as the quality of your diet has increased, the quality of your life has correspondingly diminished?

Nope.

Do you keep getting stricter with yourself?

No.

Do you sacrifice experiences you once enjoyed to eat the food you believe is right?

No. Also I think this is asking about experiances other than eating food.

Do you feel an increased sense of self-esteem when you are eating healthy food? Do you look down on others who don't?

My self-esteem is not based on food.

Do you feel guilt or self-loathing when you stray from your diet?

I can't imagine feeling guilt or self-loathing over food. Food is awesome.

Does your diet socially isolate you?

No. Social isolation is probably wrose for your health than drinking coke.

When you are eating the way you are supposed to, do you feel a peaceful sense of total control?

No. Food does not have much effect whatever I eat.

0bc6cbb653cdc5e82400f6da920f11eb

(19245)

on April 18, 2011
at 10:24 PM

You have my sympathies, food is tied up with so many important aspects of being human when your relationship with it becomes messed up it affects everything else.

7e746be2f0e550a8cd7df881322ae705

(18701)

on April 18, 2011
at 10:11 PM

I love your answers, Matthew! I really wish it was that easy for me. My problems with food go back much further than when I started Paleo.

1
77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on April 18, 2011
at 05:36 PM

I scored a negative two.

I tend to roll up to whatever drive-thru is nearby and order a #1. No need to look at the menu.

0
263e2d3f741d1ecb0886454e977f4e6f

on April 18, 2011
at 10:56 PM

I wouldn't worry too much about being labeled. In today's society if you aren't doing something that appears to be abnormal, you're not normal. Because this is a lifestyle that isn't filled with quick easy convenience foods, you have to plan ahead days in advance for your meals. Do you look at food as something else as pleasurable, well a lot of books out in the world discuss that people are obsessed with unhealthy foods. So like i said, if you aren't doing something that appears to be abnormal, you're not normal. :) Now back to planning this weeks meals err fuel :)

0
559aa134ff5e6c8bcd608ba8dc505628

(3631)

on April 18, 2011
at 06:36 PM

of course i answered yes to several of these. #7 sucks; the two questions should be mutually exclusive -- probably indicating degrees of pathology. or degree or assholishness - just because I feel good, it doesn't follow that i'd judge others... we're all just doing the best we can.*

Anyway.. the opposite of #4 has been true for me! quality of diet = quality of life! if not true for you, yr either doing it wrong, or yep, yr pathologically orthorexic. no brainer.

*except when we're not

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