6

votes

With Which food is it most important to purchase organic?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created July 16, 2012 at 1:52 AM

Most people cannot afford to buy 100% organic, so which would be most important, and why?

1) Fruits and veggies

2) Meat

3) Dairy products

4) Other

B6c16d850e7305aad0507ad079ecf1d4

(232)

on July 14, 2013
at 07:26 AM

Non-organic fertilizer could be an issue with vegetables you don't eat the skin...

Medium avatar

(3213)

on July 16, 2012
at 06:40 PM

It's on the list because this is not a Primal/Paleo list

03a4ec34751186201a56da298ac843ce

(4100)

on July 16, 2012
at 06:33 AM

@RaiseFitness: This is incorrect. You are confusing genetic engineering which uses recombinant DNA technology, with hybridization and other techniques. For example wheat is non-GMO, but dwarf wheat is a hybridized strain.

C45d7e96acd83d3a6f58193dbc140e86

on July 16, 2012
at 03:15 AM

True. Many local farmers market stands are organic but don't want to pay for the certifications to be legally called organic. They instead choose to pass the savings on to the local customer rather than some bureaucrat.

C45d7e96acd83d3a6f58193dbc140e86

on July 16, 2012
at 03:14 AM

every single crop we eat is technically a GMO, it has been bred and altered for generations and generations. Some things are better organic, some are the same either way, so go local. Really depends on the crop.

C45d7e96acd83d3a6f58193dbc140e86

on July 16, 2012
at 03:12 AM

agreed that dairy is ok if you tolerate it, and I choose pastured organic dairy over grain fed farmed.

Ce41c230e8c2a4295db31aec3ef4b2ab

(32566)

on July 16, 2012
at 02:55 AM

Many similar questions have already been asked: http://paleohacks.com/questions/tagged/organic#axzz20kZqOK9Z

03a4ec34751186201a56da298ac843ce

(4100)

on July 16, 2012
at 02:32 AM

Not sure I agree. Food is perishable, so I don't think it will be sitting anywhere for long. I cannot think of anything it will be exposed to in transit that could be worse than what Monsanto/some farmers already put into it.

03a4ec34751186201a56da298ac843ce

(4100)

on July 16, 2012
at 02:31 AM

surprised that sweet corn is on the safer side.

81348acb7b886e2b32ca915d250268f3

(1022)

on July 16, 2012
at 02:21 AM

Just cos dairy isn't paleo, doesn't mean it's not good for you (Assuming you can tolerate it). I eat a lot of yogurt cos its a great high saturated fat snack, and drink milk cos I really enjoy it. And it's just good for a bit of variety. If you are gonna consume dairy, I think choosing organic dairy products over non-organic is pretty important. Also the less processed it is the better, and tastier it is.

03a4ec34751186201a56da298ac843ce

(4100)

on July 16, 2012
at 02:21 AM

Could you explain more why grass-fed or wild meat cannot be certified (organic?) with any certainty? Do you mean organic meat in general, or just grass fed?

0382fa263de4c83328dc34a56e25437f

(4238)

on July 16, 2012
at 02:14 AM

Great question!

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5 Answers

5
707342e3cb97e0fc088917919a154b8a

on July 16, 2012
at 02:37 AM

Fruits/Veggies-- ABSOLUTELY organic is a MUST-- no GMO (genetically modified organisms), no pesticides-- consider joining a CSA or buying club (find one here: www.localharvest.com) if you can't afford organic for everything stick to the EWG's "dirty dozen" and "clean 15"-- and, if possible, buy local-- especially if you can meet your local farmer and learn how they raise their crops (hopefully non-GMO and no chemical pesticides).

Meat-- Organic only means no hormones/antibiotics and no GMO in their feed-- they're still often in cages and eating soy/corn/crap. Opt for buying directly from a farmer and you can get grassfed or pastured for a comparable price to conventional: buy in bulk (and split with some like minded friends and "cowpool") and get grassfed (I don't think the organic certification is a necessity-- and it boosts the price tremendously, but I want to know what they use to fertilize/treat the fields and how the cattle are raised) Check here: www.eatwild.com to find farms that are local to you (or those who will ship to you).

Dairy-- organic means no rBGH, I prefer grassfed and raw, when possible. In a pinch, I'll take no rBGH and non-organic.

If money is a major issue then opt for canned sardines and wild caught salmon-- both can be found very cheaply-- with some pastured (or at least soy free) eggs and chicken. But, if you shop well, you can eat Paleo for FAR less than you used to eat SAD.

4
Bcb2f5436d11467e89123680c046b858

(1356)

on July 16, 2012
at 02:39 AM

The Environmental Working Group publishes a list every year of the most and least contaminated fruits and veggies - http://www.ewg.org/foodnews/summary/

However, I believe the most important items to choose organically raised are fatty meat and dairy. Conventionally raised animal eat a lot of pesticides, herbicides, antibiotics, and (sometimes) hormones. These chemicals concentrate in the fat of the animal.

Certainly grass-fed meat can be certified organic - in that case, the pasture and hayfields must be certified organic, since that's all the animals are eating. That said, I doubt there are many chemicals other that fertilizer that are used on conventional pasture or hayfields, so I don't much care whether my grassed meat is certified or not.

Also, many farmers use organic methods, but choose not to go through the expensive certification process.

C45d7e96acd83d3a6f58193dbc140e86

on July 16, 2012
at 03:15 AM

True. Many local farmers market stands are organic but don't want to pay for the certifications to be legally called organic. They instead choose to pass the savings on to the local customer rather than some bureaucrat.

2
45ace03a0eff1219943d746cfb1c4197

(3661)

on July 16, 2012
at 02:01 AM

Bypassing dairy may be your best bet, so organic becomes a non-issue. Grass-fed or wild meat cannot be certified with any certainty, so I wouldn't bother with that either. For worthwhile organic choices, I'd go with fruits and vegetables whose skin you eat. High water content veggies like lettuce and greens are a good use of your money. Organic matters when the pesticides and chemical fertilizers are moving directly into your body.

While I said I don't worry too much about an organic designation on meats, high quality proteins shold still be where most of your money goes. Choose wisely.

C45d7e96acd83d3a6f58193dbc140e86

on July 16, 2012
at 03:12 AM

agreed that dairy is ok if you tolerate it, and I choose pastured organic dairy over grain fed farmed.

81348acb7b886e2b32ca915d250268f3

(1022)

on July 16, 2012
at 02:21 AM

Just cos dairy isn't paleo, doesn't mean it's not good for you (Assuming you can tolerate it). I eat a lot of yogurt cos its a great high saturated fat snack, and drink milk cos I really enjoy it. And it's just good for a bit of variety. If you are gonna consume dairy, I think choosing organic dairy products over non-organic is pretty important. Also the less processed it is the better, and tastier it is.

03a4ec34751186201a56da298ac843ce

(4100)

on July 16, 2012
at 02:21 AM

Could you explain more why grass-fed or wild meat cannot be certified (organic?) with any certainty? Do you mean organic meat in general, or just grass fed?

B6c16d850e7305aad0507ad079ecf1d4

(232)

on July 14, 2013
at 07:26 AM

Non-organic fertilizer could be an issue with vegetables you don't eat the skin...

0
5e5ff249c9161b8cd96d7eff6043bc3a

(4713)

on July 16, 2012
at 02:27 AM

I think looking at food selection solely in the context of organic is a mistake. Personally I'd rather have local and inorganic, than food that's organic but sitting in a warehouse for days or exposed to who knows what in transport. Assuming the locality consideration is null, I put more emphasis on fruits and vegetables, especially anything I'm not cooking before consuming, and since I do dairy I have a better emotional comfort level with organic, after hearing too many conventional farm horror stories about infected udders etc. Same with eggs. All in all I think buying as much as possible locally is a must, and organic is nice if I can get it. I think this also addresses your cost question, because farmers markets are cheap (at least the ones I go to are much cheaper than my grocery stores).

C45d7e96acd83d3a6f58193dbc140e86

on July 16, 2012
at 03:14 AM

every single crop we eat is technically a GMO, it has been bred and altered for generations and generations. Some things are better organic, some are the same either way, so go local. Really depends on the crop.

03a4ec34751186201a56da298ac843ce

(4100)

on July 16, 2012
at 02:32 AM

Not sure I agree. Food is perishable, so I don't think it will be sitting anywhere for long. I cannot think of anything it will be exposed to in transit that could be worse than what Monsanto/some farmers already put into it.

03a4ec34751186201a56da298ac843ce

(4100)

on July 16, 2012
at 06:33 AM

@RaiseFitness: This is incorrect. You are confusing genetic engineering which uses recombinant DNA technology, with hybridization and other techniques. For example wheat is non-GMO, but dwarf wheat is a hybridized strain.

03a4ec34751186201a56da298ac843ce

(4100)

on July 16, 2012
at 02:31 AM

surprised that sweet corn is on the safer side.

Medium avatar

(3213)

on July 16, 2012
at 06:40 PM

It's on the list because this is not a Primal/Paleo list

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