4

votes

So Easy a Caveman Can Afford It

Answered on September 12, 2014
Created May 10, 2010 at 10:45 PM

Much discussion has been had on Twitter, but I thought it would be good to add this to the list of other great questions found on this site. The question: What suggestions or steps do you take to make the Primal/Paleo food choices more affordable? Please be specific in your answers so that newbies can understand all steps needed to take.

C7bea2b4a21affa567a4405c69c45715

on July 10, 2011
at 11:20 PM

Wow! I didn't know that. I will have to see our Commissary does that too!

05055dcbf12c81f1cce777ec365870af

(1791)

on February 18, 2011
at 08:12 PM

no, we dont need as much food as promoted, but jason's ideal of less than 1,000 cals a day is insane long term. even short term , more than 2 days in a row, is unhealthy unless you are laying down and doing absolutely nothing all day.

A968087cc1dd66d480749c02e4619ef4

(20436)

on November 01, 2010
at 06:53 PM

Hunt and/or forage. I want to do this at some point.

4a1966b5bc00a9aefd3abd63b9913284

on October 30, 2010
at 11:42 PM

A great way to get almond flour and also get more from your almonds is to make almond milk from them first, then dry out the remaining meal. It's great for breading meats, veggies, etc. though I don't know if it's the same texture for baking as store-bought would be.

Cab7e4ef73c5d7d7a77e1c3d7f5773a1

(7304)

on October 30, 2010
at 05:03 PM

The pufas get oxidized when you bake with it, so I would avoid it for that. I pretty much avoid nuts, except for macadamias.

Bbb993c8dacf76dd461703a82686c06a

(135)

on May 13, 2010
at 02:47 AM

Robb Wolf recently warned against almond flour as high in omega 6, and especially detrimental if used in baking. He said only use it occasionally. I am cutting down, but what do you think? BTW, Trader Joes has a 1 pound bag for about $4 here in Indy.

1c4ada15ca0635582c77dbd9b1317dbf

(2614)

on May 11, 2010
at 09:38 AM

I agree with this response - we simply don't need as much food as is promoted. Quality over quantity is important I think. We're not talking about starvation here, but I reckon most people could take a third of their food away and feel better for it.

Fd35eb89073e3a758066b7fcaad63d7c

(796)

on May 11, 2010
at 03:43 AM

do you think our paleolithic ancestors limited themselves to 4-5 oz servings of meat?

F82f7d4dafb6d0ffc4c2ee2a85420786

(484)

on May 11, 2010
at 02:40 AM

Agree on buying the fattier ground beef (but obviously no good for those doing low-fat paleo eating). In fact, the fattier cuts tend to be cheaper cuts, and are great for things like making soup or stew. Also, I don't get obssessed with use-by dates or old-ish veggies - they aren't going to kill you and are often fine once cooked into things.

9cf46db81eadfffb6464228079e12875

(192)

on May 11, 2010
at 02:08 AM

Jason - is your answer based on the LeanGains? I can't argue with the results from that site, so I'm curious what you base your answer on.

64242a1130eb51f4852f78beed38b3d5

(1343)

on May 11, 2010
at 01:25 AM

Yeah around here it's very expensive too.

64242a1130eb51f4852f78beed38b3d5

(1343)

on May 11, 2010
at 01:24 AM

Yeah, planning is very good. Drumsticks become pulled chicken. Pot Roast becomes BBQ beef. Bacon becomes, well it stays bacon and that's just fine.

03aeff8d87a3b53a449b5b8e9158da98

(3268)

on May 11, 2010
at 12:35 AM

Wow, if that works for you, awesome! But I would waste away to nothing on that amount of food. I eat about 4 times that amount, and I've still lost weight since I went paleo. (Was not obese before.)

Eb6bfe929604b87fa24cdab687e606c7

on May 10, 2010
at 10:53 PM

bread is an unnecessary thing ;) but yes, you can use almond flour to make anything you'd typically make with any other flour.

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17 Answers

best answer

8
886d68c7f71750c9cf429c77dd76205b

on May 10, 2010
at 10:51 PM

Plan your meals, and always make extra, so that you have left overs to eat from all week!

You get to re-enjoy (is that a word?) your meals, and it saves the cost of having to buy food to make a new meal each day.

And it's also pretty convenient for the lazy. IE: me.

64242a1130eb51f4852f78beed38b3d5

(1343)

on May 11, 2010
at 01:24 AM

Yeah, planning is very good. Drumsticks become pulled chicken. Pot Roast becomes BBQ beef. Bacon becomes, well it stays bacon and that's just fine.

best answer

9
Eb6bfe929604b87fa24cdab687e606c7

on May 10, 2010
at 10:55 PM

  • Buy frozen vegetables!
  • Buy the fruit that's on sale
  • Buy cuts of meat like liver and heart - nobody usually wants them so they're cheap!
  • Cook with coconut oil. Far less expensive than EVOO and stuff like that. Plus it's tastier!
  • Buy nuts in bulk...also, eat less nuts. One handful a day should be sufficient :)

5
99ac392257e444e014be6d4da6a900e4

(1036)

on May 11, 2010
at 12:19 AM

Eat less. Period. I said this in another thread. Most Americans eat too much. A serving of protein (meat) should be 4-5 oz. Americans are used to eating 8-12 ounces. Turn that 10 ounce steak into 2 meals.

I started doing the Lean Gains plan. I now skip breakfast, eat a big lunch and a smaller dinner. One meal per day is 4 pastured eggs and some veggies. Last "meal" is some organic cottage cheese. Throw in an additional fasting day where you only eat dinner and that'll save even more $ every week/month.

1c4ada15ca0635582c77dbd9b1317dbf

(2614)

on May 11, 2010
at 09:38 AM

I agree with this response - we simply don't need as much food as is promoted. Quality over quantity is important I think. We're not talking about starvation here, but I reckon most people could take a third of their food away and feel better for it.

9cf46db81eadfffb6464228079e12875

(192)

on May 11, 2010
at 02:08 AM

Jason - is your answer based on the LeanGains? I can't argue with the results from that site, so I'm curious what you base your answer on.

03aeff8d87a3b53a449b5b8e9158da98

(3268)

on May 11, 2010
at 12:35 AM

Wow, if that works for you, awesome! But I would waste away to nothing on that amount of food. I eat about 4 times that amount, and I've still lost weight since I went paleo. (Was not obese before.)

Fd35eb89073e3a758066b7fcaad63d7c

(796)

on May 11, 2010
at 03:43 AM

do you think our paleolithic ancestors limited themselves to 4-5 oz servings of meat?

05055dcbf12c81f1cce777ec365870af

(1791)

on February 18, 2011
at 08:12 PM

no, we dont need as much food as promoted, but jason's ideal of less than 1,000 cals a day is insane long term. even short term , more than 2 days in a row, is unhealthy unless you are laying down and doing absolutely nothing all day.

4
77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on May 11, 2010
at 11:39 PM

grow your own vegies in summer.

A968087cc1dd66d480749c02e4619ef4

(20436)

on November 01, 2010
at 06:53 PM

Hunt and/or forage. I want to do this at some point.

3
431274eafd914ee34d9c57262c1f617a

on May 10, 2010
at 11:52 PM

Whenever possible, buy your meat in bulk. I have no problem with freezing meat and have a 13cu ft freezer. I'm looking at farms where I'll be able to buy 1/4-1/2 cow and 1/2 pig....which will only be from a natural feeding farm.

Right now, because money is tight, I buy supermarket meat, whatever is on sale or marked down, I will look at....and often buy. If I see steaks that are marked down, I'll grab as many as I can afford. If you shop weekly. you can usually get a nice variety over a month of so. A NON-frost-free freezer keeps meat at or below 0 for a good long time.

I also always have ground beef around. I buy it when it's on sale mostly and make patties, or several meat loafs, or batches of "taco meat" and freeze it. There's always something you can do with ground beef. (I only buy the high fat ones....low fat is tasteless and useless!)

F82f7d4dafb6d0ffc4c2ee2a85420786

(484)

on May 11, 2010
at 02:40 AM

Agree on buying the fattier ground beef (but obviously no good for those doing low-fat paleo eating). In fact, the fattier cuts tend to be cheaper cuts, and are great for things like making soup or stew. Also, I don't get obssessed with use-by dates or old-ish veggies - they aren't going to kill you and are often fine once cooked into things.

2
Fd35eb89073e3a758066b7fcaad63d7c

on May 11, 2010
at 01:25 AM

Ask the butcher if he puts meat on sale on its "sell by date." At our commissary, all meat that expires that day goes on sale around 3pm, so I go then and stock up and freeze it. If they don't have any out, I ask. The butchers all know me.

Also look for veggies that are cheap and go a long way. Heads of red cabbage. Onions and mushrooms.

C7bea2b4a21affa567a4405c69c45715

on July 10, 2011
at 11:20 PM

Wow! I didn't know that. I will have to see our Commissary does that too!

2
9cf46db81eadfffb6464228079e12875

on May 10, 2010
at 10:47 PM

One example to get this going would be the use of buying almonds in their nut/solid state. I like to throw them in the food processor and turn them into almond flour. At my local grocer, almond flour is more than $10/lb. Almonds however are only $9 for a 32 oz. container. Do the math and I can now get my almond flour for only $4.50/lbs.

64242a1130eb51f4852f78beed38b3d5

(1343)

on May 11, 2010
at 01:25 AM

Yeah around here it's very expensive too.

Bbb993c8dacf76dd461703a82686c06a

(135)

on May 13, 2010
at 02:47 AM

Robb Wolf recently warned against almond flour as high in omega 6, and especially detrimental if used in baking. He said only use it occasionally. I am cutting down, but what do you think? BTW, Trader Joes has a 1 pound bag for about $4 here in Indy.

Cab7e4ef73c5d7d7a77e1c3d7f5773a1

(7304)

on October 30, 2010
at 05:03 PM

The pufas get oxidized when you bake with it, so I would avoid it for that. I pretty much avoid nuts, except for macadamias.

4a1966b5bc00a9aefd3abd63b9913284

on October 30, 2010
at 11:42 PM

A great way to get almond flour and also get more from your almonds is to make almond milk from them first, then dry out the remaining meal. It's great for breading meats, veggies, etc. though I don't know if it's the same texture for baking as store-bought would be.

1
61852721b5ff3613f56f043fe890a679

(1172)

on October 31, 2010
at 01:18 AM

i belong to a food co-op, where all the high-quality food i want is priced well below retail. in exchange for 3 hours of labor a month, i save a LOT.

secondly, i participate in meatshares/csa's when i can.

1
D31a2a2d43191b15ca4a1c7ec7d03038

on October 30, 2010
at 04:49 PM

I buy certain things at different markets. I only shop once a week. One week I go a particular store and stock up on the things that are the best price at that store. The following week, one of the other stores. In choosing the stores, I factor in driving distance.

Other than that, here is my regular plan:

Buy meat on sale, and as others have mentioned, things such as beef and chicken liver, are good values for the nutrients. The fat drippings from the fattiest ground meat make good cooking fat. I only cook with meat fat or butter/ghee. Most weeks, the drippings will last for cooking other things, until I buy meat again. (Though, beef drippings taste better than chocolate and it is tempting to eat them with a spoon.)

Buy the least expensive vegetables, and try to get locally grown, in season. One market often has "manager's specials" in a special section, which are much lower priced. And, I grow some of my own vegetables, and many herbs.

If something is on sale, I try to buy enough to last until it goes on sale again. Canned salmon, tuna, sardines, herring, seaweed, almond butter, tea, sea salt, and other staples which can be stored for long periods of time. (I prefer canned fish to canned beef when the weather is too bad to go shopping.)

Having a good water filter, such as a Berkey, is a great help. Drinking water is delightful, and it makes good tea. I use one that has the additional cartridges for removing fluoride and chlorine.

Other than the stocking up on the items for long-term staples, my regular shopping list each week is short and makes shopping quick:

Beef, one or two kinds

Beef bacon

Chicken livers or beef liver

Fish (sometimes)

Eggs

Heavy whipping cream

Butter

Low-starch vegetables, with an occasional parsnip or pumpkin

--

Sometimes trading with neighbors works out. I have traded homemade soap for eggs, cookies for large containers of bacon fat, etc.

If you have a large freezer and can get a side of beef, that can be the best value.

My plan may not be suitable for anyone else, but it works very well for me, at this time.

Hope this is of use.

1
85386e1e883e78f7760f9cc007037b52

(180)

on May 11, 2010
at 12:55 PM

I agree - cheap cuts of meat are the way to go! My favourites are heart, liver, kidneys, lamb breast, pork belly, oxtail, and tongue

Also pig skin - make pork scratchings (I get an A3 sheet of pig skin from my butcher for ??1, which makes two sandwich boxes of scratchings and a tub full of lard)

And save bones to make stock or soup, save them up in the freezer if necessary.

1
6cf810b800b37f9c11bc14c6b06dab4e

(80)

on May 10, 2010
at 10:50 PM

Can you use Almond Flour to make bread? I'm new to this Paleao thing..

Eb6bfe929604b87fa24cdab687e606c7

on May 10, 2010
at 10:53 PM

bread is an unnecessary thing ;) but yes, you can use almond flour to make anything you'd typically make with any other flour.

0
6d6ea9b1b8bdaf600da33057676ff570

on November 02, 2010
at 06:14 PM

If you live in a more rural area, stop by your local orchards! I just purchased 35lbs of apples in nearly perfect condition for $7.00 from their "damaged" bin! It will become apple sauce and apple chips! They also may have damaged winter squash, pumpkins, or other tasty foods.

0
24fcc21452ebe39c032be6801d6bbadd

(9812)

on November 01, 2010
at 03:01 PM

I've made an effort to buy more local produce lately, and it's been great! Last week, I stopped by a farmer stand on the side of the road & got a head of broccoli, a quart of green beans, a dozen pastured eggs, a quart of tomatoes, and a giant bag of kale for 9 bucks! Probably would've been $15 or so at my local Giant.

0
6f0efd477208f51d145bea6d7272256e

(627)

on May 11, 2010
at 01:11 PM

Check out your local produce markets. I live in an area where I'm near both high-end markets and a low-end alternative. For most things, like Romaine or avocado or swiss chard the low-end market is priced 40-50% lower. Occasionally I hit the top markets, but most of the time I'm slummin'. Sometimes I walk out as much produce as I can carry for less than 5 bucks.

My wife is a wiz at finding meats that are mispriced. A couple of months back she scored a high-end ham for $9 that should have cost more than $30.

She also aggressively pursues rain checks. Recent example: a good sale on asparagus, one of the few veggies all three of us really like. By the time my wife got there, the pickings were slim - old and gnarly. So she pestered a clerk to give her a big fat rain check. A week later we're eating much better asparagus chosen at leisure.

0
D8691a1cee39ea420a36b163d4a4042b

(404)

on May 11, 2010
at 12:56 PM

Stewed pork leg with bok Choy is incredibly cheap (like 1.29 a pound for the pork) and delicious. If you live in a white area it can be hard to find the right cut. You need one that has NOT been trimmed of skin and fat. You're looking for what is a full cross section of a pork leg. Add the bok choy towards the end of the cooking process. Like four hours with the pork, then half an hour with the bok choy.

You can try the Thai pork leg recipes on the Internet, omiting (most of) the sugar.

0
1c4ada15ca0635582c77dbd9b1317dbf

(2614)

on May 11, 2010
at 09:40 AM

Buy meat that the general public don't want - it's cheaper. Most offal is very cheap, as are many types of 'inferior' meat cuts.

-1
4a1966b5bc00a9aefd3abd63b9913284

on October 30, 2010
at 11:44 PM

I wrote a post on this recently where, though I didn't supply tips as you all have here, I did specify what's the most important to spend money on vs where you can skimp a little on quality.

"Priorities for Eating Paleo on a Budget." http://www.balancedbites.com/2010/10/priorities-for-eating-paleo-on-budget.html

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