2

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Paleo way of life for Kids

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created March 11, 2010 at 3:22 AM

What exposure do your children/grandchildren have to the Paleo way of life? My son is fortunate to live in an area of California where the school has a small hobby farm and the kids compost waste for the organic school garden. They raise chickens and goats and know where eggs come from. It is great that city kids have this experience.

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on September 07, 2013
at 01:28 AM

That's interesting in these times. I have eaten a few foraged plants myself, such as stinging nettles, but have never relied on that as my food supply.

3f0a69f164d8fac2cdee80c19526f83f

(205)

on July 19, 2012
at 08:46 PM

Just a minor point of clarification - homeschooling is allowed in all 50 states of the US. But as the OP said the specific requirements do vary state by state.

33b6c516904a967ef8ecb30f1dbd8cf2

(7073)

on March 13, 2010
at 08:14 AM

yep, the rules vary from place to place, it is illegal in Germany but allowed to varying degrees in the rest of Europe.....just like different states in the US.

9d43f6873107e17ca4d1a5055aa7a2ad

on March 13, 2010
at 02:44 AM

Is homeschooling allowed in your country? I have heard it's sometimes hard to do it in Europe.

5ebeec76e20738d0a17cd724d64b1e0f

(1922)

on March 12, 2010
at 12:22 AM

+1. Very inspiring answer!

33b6c516904a967ef8ecb30f1dbd8cf2

(7073)

on March 11, 2010
at 08:15 PM

Oh they love that stuff!

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on March 11, 2010
at 03:16 PM

And when I cut a side of beef on the kitchen table by using the 'road map' in the Joy of Cooking, they got an even bigger lesson in anatomy- so did I.

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on March 11, 2010
at 03:14 PM

Years ago when I tried to shield my four kids from the blood and guts involved in killing and cleaning home-grown chickens for the freezer I spotted them all hiding behind trees watching from afar. So I invited them over and let them pull the innards out by grabbing onto the heart and gizzard- they all got yucky, but we had a good anatomy lesson.

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2 Answers

3
33b6c516904a967ef8ecb30f1dbd8cf2

(7073)

on March 11, 2010
at 08:20 AM

I am very privileged; I home school my two daughters so I am at total liberty to educate them into the Paleo way of life; we go primal most afternoons outside and I am teaching them how to identify local edible plants and do things such as maple and birch tapping, hunting for edible snails, wild fruit and mushrooms and I hope to move onto setting simple traps soon. The eldest has a fire-striker, knife and axe and can light a fire safely with collected wood, kindling and matches.

Although it is very hard not to give into peer pressure and I believe more detrimental than good to actively disallow children to eat some things when they see their friends around them enjoying certain foodstuffs, I try to be easy on them, yet educate them into making the right choices at the same time: one of the most important things we do is sit around the table together at mealtimes and talk about where the food we are eating comes from, why we are eating it and what it does for our bodies. They are pretty well versed in the benefits of meat and saturated fat, raw dairy and fermented foods and the dangers of eating carbs and sugars (I do make pancakes for them with fermented flour occasionally and we have made wild yeast bread from wheat berries with a grain mill and as I mentioned in another post, they love their 85% chocolate experience every week!). We also visit the local fresh food market every week to see what's in season and visit the dairies where the cows are milked.

This summer we are starting a vegetable patch in our very small garden.

They are absolutely fine seeing dead animals and know which part of a pig/cow is used for some cuts of meat (but still are not willing to eat organ meat!) in France the meat actually has the same name as the animal, where as in the english language it has been changed.

They were not phased when our neighbor dragged a dead deer past our house last autumn and we used it as a topic of conversation for many days afterwards. They understand about animal cruelty in food production as I make a point of saying, 'this bacon comes from happy pigs who have been able to move about outside'......etc.

my daughters are 4 and 7.

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on March 11, 2010
at 03:16 PM

And when I cut a side of beef on the kitchen table by using the 'road map' in the Joy of Cooking, they got an even bigger lesson in anatomy- so did I.

33b6c516904a967ef8ecb30f1dbd8cf2

(7073)

on March 11, 2010
at 08:15 PM

Oh they love that stuff!

33b6c516904a967ef8ecb30f1dbd8cf2

(7073)

on March 13, 2010
at 08:14 AM

yep, the rules vary from place to place, it is illegal in Germany but allowed to varying degrees in the rest of Europe.....just like different states in the US.

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on March 11, 2010
at 03:14 PM

Years ago when I tried to shield my four kids from the blood and guts involved in killing and cleaning home-grown chickens for the freezer I spotted them all hiding behind trees watching from afar. So I invited them over and let them pull the innards out by grabbing onto the heart and gizzard- they all got yucky, but we had a good anatomy lesson.

5ebeec76e20738d0a17cd724d64b1e0f

(1922)

on March 12, 2010
at 12:22 AM

+1. Very inspiring answer!

9d43f6873107e17ca4d1a5055aa7a2ad

on March 13, 2010
at 02:44 AM

Is homeschooling allowed in your country? I have heard it's sometimes hard to do it in Europe.

3f0a69f164d8fac2cdee80c19526f83f

(205)

on July 19, 2012
at 08:46 PM

Just a minor point of clarification - homeschooling is allowed in all 50 states of the US. But as the OP said the specific requirements do vary state by state.

0
2f931662684a7747be36255c8b486228

(1049)

on March 24, 2011
at 09:31 PM

Luckily we have a neighbor who goes foraging. This is an incredible woman who never had much formal schooling and picks most of her food from various fields and tress (the really old fashioned way, which for her is normal). Soon she will be taking me along to show me her tricks, though I doubt I will become a forager, but would like my daughter to at least experience this lost art. Our neighbor keeps a few chickens as well.

In our house, there is nothing forbidden except agave and cacao powder, outside the house.........nightmare.

It is very difficult to keep telling a young child that exception means only when you cannot do otherwise and to pick their exceptions wisely. I have decided that she has to get there on her own timing. It is important that she understand (even at 5) the reasons behind this diet and she has to appreciate and want the positive aspects it has to offer. So, she will never eat a forbidden item (and she knows exactly what they are) without asking.... at least 3 times... hoping for a yes. She never gets a yes. She gets "it's up to you, but I'd prefer you eat something else, it's your health, your teeth". Sometimes she indulges, though just as often, without my blessing, the devil loses its appeal.

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on September 07, 2013
at 01:28 AM

That's interesting in these times. I have eaten a few foraged plants myself, such as stinging nettles, but have never relied on that as my food supply.

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