3

votes

Are organic eggs worth it?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created April 06, 2010 at 1:40 AM

I've been eating a lot of eggs since going paleo. I go through about two dozen a week without a problem. Organic eggs are about double the price of regular eggs. Is buying organic eggs worth the extra cost health wise?

From what I understand, the upside to organic eggs is omega 3's, so supplementing with fish oil and eating normal eggs might be the optimal compromise.

85963b0013f3fbec960de87bc41a25f9

(10)

on July 26, 2012
at 02:13 AM

Yes. The nutritional value more than makes up for the cost. Avoid supplements and get the nutrition from a natural source. Boil Egg Pro: http://itunes.apple.com/us/app/boil-egg-pro/id544519315

0bcefaa82dc94f93ce705f86e235f335

(1591)

on February 21, 2011
at 05:31 PM

I buy pastured ghee, so I can use my Kerrygold in its luscious original form. :)

0037d03799fbdf83d3edc63dab01ac5a

(236)

on July 01, 2010
at 06:46 PM

Egg farmers can supplement in flaxseed among other things to get a brighter yolk. At that point, it's just a trick. It doesn't tell anything about whether or not your chicken had a healthy diet.

65125edd5aafad39b3d5b3a8b4a36bb7

(6082)

on April 08, 2010
at 03:36 AM

Organic is not the same as local farm fresh. Organic just means it has been produced according to government standards regarding chemicals and such.

65125edd5aafad39b3d5b3a8b4a36bb7

(6082)

on April 08, 2010
at 03:35 AM

The idea of feeding seaweed to chickens is funny to me, but probably not to the chickens.

A89f9751a97c3082802dc0bcbe4e9208

(13978)

on April 07, 2010
at 02:33 AM

Free range and pastured are not necessarily the same thing by USDA standards. Check this link: http://lowcarbdiets.about.com/od/lowcarbsuperfoods/a/cagefreeeggsdef.htm

35a8b223ae5d863f17a8c9e3a8eed5eb

(571)

on April 06, 2010
at 08:34 PM

i am confused to compare: organic store bought : pale battery: rich in color (yes, yolk looks VERY dark orange) free range : rich in color, but not that dark as battery So the battery eggs and pasture eggs look the same, but taste different?

0fb8b3d6dcfb279b0f7e050d2d22510f

(4645)

on April 06, 2010
at 03:17 PM

Most of my eggs are bought from a friend who raises chickens- I know thewy have free run of the yard and have to be herded back intot eh coop at the end of the day- a far cry from "free range' chickens that may not ever leave their dark coop thru that small door. My yolks are a bright orange- thick and plump and taste like nothing I ever had. The other farm eggs I get from a larger farm I never saw in nearby PA is second best but still darker than supermarket bought.

8e3782b68e033763485472f414f507a5

(2433)

on April 06, 2010
at 11:46 AM

Eggs from chickens eating a natural diet (grass, bugs, etc) tend to have a richer color. Check out http://www.chicamarun.com/eggs.html

35a8b223ae5d863f17a8c9e3a8eed5eb

(571)

on April 06, 2010
at 08:42 AM

What do you mean by "rich in color"? I thought the supermarket eggs are the dark (rich in color) ones. The yolks of the fresh farm eggs are brighter and more pale. At least from my experience

A89f9751a97c3082802dc0bcbe4e9208

(13978)

on April 06, 2010
at 07:13 AM

We eat about 2 to 3 eggs per meal. I guess we're lightweights. So $4.50 / dozen is about $1 per meal for us. Yeah, it works out. ;)

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on April 06, 2010
at 04:30 AM

Who says the fish oil is good and not rancid? Better go with the organic eggs. Nothing beats having your own laying hens but organic pastured are the nex t best bet.

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10 Answers

6
E35e3d76547b18096a59c90029e7e107

(15613)

on April 07, 2010
at 01:30 PM

Paying for good eggs is probably worth it, but whether organic eggs are good is up for debate, it's going to vary from source to source.

Good eggs are raised on nutritious food, with access to grass, bugs, sunlight, as free from stress as possible and ideally without any chemical pesticides/antibiotics/hormones in their diet. Organic will guarantee the last facet of the above, but it needn't have any impact on the others. It's entirely possible (indeed this applies for the organic eggs in my supermarket) to feed chickens on organic corn or soy, it's difficult to imagine that this would bring that much benefit.

This is borne out by this study: organic eggs contained slightly less omega 3 than conventional eggs (1.34 versus 1.36) at a ratio of 1.34:15 (!) omega 3:6 (admittedly a better ratio than conventional though). Eggs might be nutritious in lots of ways, but if you're after balancing your omega 3 levels then you'd better look to fish. Omega 3 eggs (likely fed on flax or seaweed) conversely, contained 6.57g omega-3 (about 5 times more) at a ratio of 6.57:14.8.

The benefits of pastured eggs have been shown here, they contained 0.66g omega-3 per 100g compared to 0.22 for conventional eggs. They also contained 4-5 times more vitamin D and about 50% more vitamin A.

On the question of eggs in general, even the cheaper ones aren't good value for fat/protein compared to cheaper cuts of meat (but then I never buy grass-fed), I eat them for the various nutrients that you get from yolks that you don't really get from muscle meat: choline, K2, vitamin D and 'precursor molecules'.

65125edd5aafad39b3d5b3a8b4a36bb7

(6082)

on April 08, 2010
at 03:35 AM

The idea of feeding seaweed to chickens is funny to me, but probably not to the chickens.

4
08ce57b1bbb3bda8e384234389c36d94

on April 06, 2010
at 03:12 AM

$4.50 for at least two nutritionally dense satiating and tasty paleo meals is about as inexpensive as you can get. Seriously.

A89f9751a97c3082802dc0bcbe4e9208

(13978)

on April 06, 2010
at 07:13 AM

We eat about 2 to 3 eggs per meal. I guess we're lightweights. So $4.50 / dozen is about $1 per meal for us. Yeah, it works out. ;)

3
5e36f73c3f95eb4ea13a009f4936449f

(8280)

on February 21, 2011
at 08:59 PM

There's a reason why the regular eggs are cheap (mass market eggs). The question you want to ask yourself is if you really want to be eating something from chickens treated that way.

2
0fb8b3d6dcfb279b0f7e050d2d22510f

(4645)

on April 06, 2010
at 04:13 AM

YES, a big YES. If you never had a fresh farm egg, you never had a real egg. The yolks are rich in color and Omega3s. Even my kids won't touch a supermarket egg any more which is at least 3 weeks old BEFORE they make it to the shelves and 'dated.' My eggs are about a day old when I buy them.

The skinny- Range free chickens are chickens that are allowed to leave their coop through a small door but rarely do and still eat mostly grain. That small door makes for good copy on the box and little else.

You want chickens that have a diet of bugs and grasses picked found outdoors. They still have a grain diet but the bug and grass food makes all the difference. I'm lucky to live close to farms and even friends in the 'burbs who raise a few in their yard. Look for them and really enjoy an Egg.

35a8b223ae5d863f17a8c9e3a8eed5eb

(571)

on April 06, 2010
at 08:42 AM

What do you mean by "rich in color"? I thought the supermarket eggs are the dark (rich in color) ones. The yolks of the fresh farm eggs are brighter and more pale. At least from my experience

8e3782b68e033763485472f414f507a5

(2433)

on April 06, 2010
at 11:46 AM

Eggs from chickens eating a natural diet (grass, bugs, etc) tend to have a richer color. Check out http://www.chicamarun.com/eggs.html

0fb8b3d6dcfb279b0f7e050d2d22510f

(4645)

on April 06, 2010
at 03:17 PM

Most of my eggs are bought from a friend who raises chickens- I know thewy have free run of the yard and have to be herded back intot eh coop at the end of the day- a far cry from "free range' chickens that may not ever leave their dark coop thru that small door. My yolks are a bright orange- thick and plump and taste like nothing I ever had. The other farm eggs I get from a larger farm I never saw in nearby PA is second best but still darker than supermarket bought.

65125edd5aafad39b3d5b3a8b4a36bb7

(6082)

on April 08, 2010
at 03:36 AM

Organic is not the same as local farm fresh. Organic just means it has been produced according to government standards regarding chemicals and such.

35a8b223ae5d863f17a8c9e3a8eed5eb

(571)

on April 06, 2010
at 08:34 PM

i am confused to compare: organic store bought : pale battery: rich in color (yes, yolk looks VERY dark orange) free range : rich in color, but not that dark as battery So the battery eggs and pasture eggs look the same, but taste different?

2
A89f9751a97c3082802dc0bcbe4e9208

(13978)

on April 06, 2010
at 02:26 AM

This question has already been dealt with here.

Basic CAFO eggs have little to no nutritional content. I suggest that you buy Organic Omega-3 eggs or, even better, find a source of PASTURED eggs.

I buy three dozen eggs / week for myself and my husband. I spend $4.50 / dozen. I'm okay doing this because it's my breakfast! It's the fatty/protein foundation on which I build my day. Yes. Worth it. Our budget is tight; but I make it work.

This About.com article has a little more information about what all the labels mean.

1
782828e745d3ab159ad8f70abbc4094d

(130)

on April 06, 2010
at 09:46 AM

If you can, take a step further and go free range/barn laid too, it's better for the hen as well. YMMV, but I find paying extra for animal welfare is worth it, not to mention I think they taste better.

0
Medium avatar

on February 21, 2011
at 06:22 PM

I pay something like $5.39 for a dozen pastured, organic eggs. The taste is incredible, the yolks are a deep orange with that "muscle tone" that Joel Salatin speaks of and I'm certain that the grass and bugs in their diet (varies with the season) increases the nutritional value. Worth every penny.

0
58cc17a77bca6e503dcf6bf6471b76a1

(478)

on February 21, 2011
at 04:48 PM

I got my eggs free from my in-laws..so I haven't had a thought to switch to organic/free range/farm raised eggs..Gotta do what I gotta do to stay within my budget. At least I invest on Kerrygold butter to make my own ghee.

0bcefaa82dc94f93ce705f86e235f335

(1591)

on February 21, 2011
at 05:31 PM

I buy pastured ghee, so I can use my Kerrygold in its luscious original form. :)

0
77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on April 08, 2010
at 12:43 AM

I'd be hard-pressed to say that CAFO eggs have "little to no nutritional content". I'm sure that more often than not, pastured eggs are nutritionally superior from a vitamin/mineral standpoint. However, it's a whole other thing to suggest that CAFO eggs are nutritionally bankrupt.

Also, while pastured eggs may have a higher O3 content, how much of that is actually ALA as opposed to EPA/DHA? Most producers seem to be sketchy on that point from what I've seen. Also does anyone know the O6 content of pastured eggs? Many people assume it's lower but I haven't seen any hard evidence. Also considering the amount of O6 found in O3 eggs in the study linked by David Moss above, I'm not sure myself anymore about the EFA "advantage" of pastured eggs.

I'm not bashing eggs. Just putting it out there.

0
35a8b223ae5d863f17a8c9e3a8eed5eb

(571)

on April 06, 2010
at 08:39 PM

i am confused

  • organic store bought : pale
  • battery: rich in color (yes, yolk looks VERY dark orange, at least in my country)
  • free range (pastured) : rich in color, but not as dark as battery

So the battery eggs and pasture eggs look almost the same, but taste different?

A89f9751a97c3082802dc0bcbe4e9208

(13978)

on April 07, 2010
at 02:33 AM

Free range and pastured are not necessarily the same thing by USDA standards. Check this link: http://lowcarbdiets.about.com/od/lowcarbsuperfoods/a/cagefreeeggsdef.htm

0037d03799fbdf83d3edc63dab01ac5a

(236)

on July 01, 2010
at 06:46 PM

Egg farmers can supplement in flaxseed among other things to get a brighter yolk. At that point, it's just a trick. It doesn't tell anything about whether or not your chicken had a healthy diet.

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