1

votes

raw onions anyone?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created May 27, 2011 at 10:21 PM

Hi all. Just wondering about the safety of raw onions. Coming upon info on T-Nation re: testosterone boosting properties of raw oinons/onion juice I am interested in including this in the diet. Any suggestions as to why not? I have heard many are allergic to raw oinions and that onions can cause GERD possibly this is the case with onions per se not just those in the raw state? Any feedback on this issue?

32d059a467e99a4fc83201407a4a238d

on January 11, 2013
at 06:48 PM

obviously raw onions are still nutritious. just mix it up with cooked occasionally.

32d059a467e99a4fc83201407a4a238d

on January 11, 2013
at 06:47 PM

"Both raw and cooked red onions are excellent sources of vitamin C, chromium, dietary fiber and B vitamins. However, a 2008 article published in the scientific journal "Food Chemistry" suggests that cooking releases the red onion's heart-healthy antoxidants and quercetin into the body more efficiently than ingesting the vegetable raw." http://www.livestrong.com/article/498637-does-raw-or-cooked-red-onion-help-the-heart/#ixzz2Hh6TOlfu

194d8e8140425057fe06202e1e5822a7

(3979)

on January 11, 2013
at 12:20 AM

wait, really? what nutrients?

194d8e8140425057fe06202e1e5822a7

(3979)

on January 10, 2013
at 09:58 PM

hunter gatherers weren't stupid. Just because you wouldn't sink your teeth into something doesn't mean you shouldn't eat it. They could crush it up/cut it up finely.

Ebb10603524dd22621c1155dd7ddf106

(19150)

on January 10, 2013
at 06:12 PM

Ehhh ... maybe, but I don't buy it. Besides that fact that I do eat raw onions just as you described, one could make a similar case for peppers, which even before human intervention had varying levels of capsacin heat. Granted, peppers aren't exactly a paleolithic food for humans (at earliest early neolithic).

44348571d9bc70c02ac2975cc500f154

(5853)

on May 28, 2011
at 01:47 PM

Leeks are also nice, more aromatic.

2f54dbe892ec89b12d1db686568e885a

(919)

on May 28, 2011
at 08:16 AM

no irony here then, upvote

C23ec4b85f3cbeb9ddf6bf78317d56e3

(300)

on May 28, 2011
at 02:37 AM

people used to eat sweet onions raw out of the ground all the time. at least, according to my dad. I eat raw onions in my salads all the time. no ill effects so far.

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on May 28, 2011
at 02:04 AM

attack of the killer tomatoes/onions oh my!

Ed71ab1c75c6a9bd217a599db0a3e117

(25482)

on May 28, 2011
at 12:56 AM

Love raw organic red onions in cucumber salad with fresh garlic in herbs with macademia nut oil. I'm loving it

Fa9f340eddbad9a544184c688fa4dcdd

(6433)

on May 27, 2011
at 11:20 PM

Just edited my answer to include this. Cooking deactivates this defence mechanism.

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on May 27, 2011
at 11:17 PM

Thanks for the feedback. I was sketchy on the fructose before but decided not to concern myself. However, it is best to limit them I think. As to raw: is there much difference digestion-wise?

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7 Answers

4
C2ad96801ec1e22d2bf62475b6e52751

(1416)

on May 28, 2011
at 01:03 AM

Warning. Raw onions are extremely dangerous. In my town, they kidnapped and murdered a family of three. Not to be trusted.

2f54dbe892ec89b12d1db686568e885a

(919)

on May 28, 2011
at 08:16 AM

no irony here then, upvote

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on May 28, 2011
at 02:04 AM

attack of the killer tomatoes/onions oh my!

2
2fd93e91bb14e641a2bac9c6033e84e2

(1614)

on January 10, 2013
at 08:56 PM

FWIW, raw onions are a good prebiotic. I try to eat a little bit of minced raw onion or garlic every now and then.

http://www.marksdailyapple.com/prebiotics/#axzz2HbmG47MH

2
Fa9f340eddbad9a544184c688fa4dcdd

(6433)

on May 27, 2011
at 11:11 PM

Onions have high levels of fructans and fructooligosaccharides, so depending on your digestive system/gut ecology, significant amounts could cause an upset stomach, diarrhea, wind and bloating.

Also, when onions are crushed/chopped volatile sulphur compounds react with water to form sulphuric acid. I imagine that quaffing large amounts would probably burn or irritate your mouth and throat, just as it can irritate and burn your eyes.

Fa9f340eddbad9a544184c688fa4dcdd

(6433)

on May 27, 2011
at 11:20 PM

Just edited my answer to include this. Cooking deactivates this defence mechanism.

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on May 27, 2011
at 11:17 PM

Thanks for the feedback. I was sketchy on the fructose before but decided not to concern myself. However, it is best to limit them I think. As to raw: is there much difference digestion-wise?

1
350b0731c9408c50103d771f0f54eb67

on January 10, 2013
at 05:32 PM

I eat some form of raw onion every day. I have not been severely sick with the flu in over a year now. It is my own food group and a daily staple. Love green onions the best. Reds are second of course.

0
32d059a467e99a4fc83201407a4a238d

on January 10, 2013
at 11:56 PM

Cooked onions are higher in nutrients.

32d059a467e99a4fc83201407a4a238d

on January 11, 2013
at 06:47 PM

"Both raw and cooked red onions are excellent sources of vitamin C, chromium, dietary fiber and B vitamins. However, a 2008 article published in the scientific journal "Food Chemistry" suggests that cooking releases the red onion's heart-healthy antoxidants and quercetin into the body more efficiently than ingesting the vegetable raw." http://www.livestrong.com/article/498637-does-raw-or-cooked-red-onion-help-the-heart/#ixzz2Hh6TOlfu

194d8e8140425057fe06202e1e5822a7

(3979)

on January 11, 2013
at 12:20 AM

wait, really? what nutrients?

32d059a467e99a4fc83201407a4a238d

on January 11, 2013
at 06:48 PM

obviously raw onions are still nutritious. just mix it up with cooked occasionally.

0
194d8e8140425057fe06202e1e5822a7

(3979)

on January 10, 2013
at 09:58 PM

Raw onions help with fat digestion, too.

0
0382d14e141eebaee70940cbf5d37675

(0)

on February 29, 2012
at 06:35 PM

Can you imagine a hunter-gatherer sinking his teeth into, and eating, a raw onion? I can't. The fact that I cannot eat a whole raw onion - to me - is my body's evolutionarily designed way of telling me that it isn't good for me.

Ebb10603524dd22621c1155dd7ddf106

(19150)

on January 10, 2013
at 06:12 PM

Ehhh ... maybe, but I don't buy it. Besides that fact that I do eat raw onions just as you described, one could make a similar case for peppers, which even before human intervention had varying levels of capsacin heat. Granted, peppers aren't exactly a paleolithic food for humans (at earliest early neolithic).

194d8e8140425057fe06202e1e5822a7

(3979)

on January 10, 2013
at 09:58 PM

hunter gatherers weren't stupid. Just because you wouldn't sink your teeth into something doesn't mean you shouldn't eat it. They could crush it up/cut it up finely.

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