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Has increased omega3 intake improved your food intolerances?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created June 17, 2013 at 12:30 PM

I've seen some anecdotal evidence of people here saying that their food intolerances improved after being Paleo for a while, and that this might have to do with increased intake of omega3/improved PUFA ratio.

I also recently came across this study which appears to provide some proof for this theory:

http://www.hindawi.com/journals/cdi/2012/236564/

I'm trying to figure out if this is something that I should be paying more attention to. I've been on an AIP Paleo diet for half a year now and though my health has improved significantly, if anything I seem to have become sensitive to more foods, not less. I've recently succesfully reintroduced small amount of nuts (which have really helped with getting my magnesium levels up) but I continue to be unable to eat most fruits/fodmaps, dairy, nightshades, and most other seeds (even black pepper will set off symptoms). I strictly adhere to the diet and do moderate/high carb, with lots of veggies and tubers. Reintroduction attempts generally make me extremely lethargic and give me severe back and neck pain for several days, inducing a case of overactive bladder, GERD-like symptoms, bloating, gas, loose stools and sinus congestion.

Has anyone noticed significant improvements in food intolerance after improving PUFA o3/o6 ratios? Or could you share your other succesful strategies for overcoming food intolerances? I've tried l-glutamine (didn't do that much, not sure what to make of the whole leaky gut argument) and regularly eat homemade sauerkraut (which has really helped my digestion but not the food intolerances)

C8586fa2188272d5474d22aa8a500619

(358)

on June 19, 2013
at 05:29 PM

For me vitami D was second biggest contributor causing impaired intestinal barrier (alcohol first). Low Vit D is hypothesized to cause increased celiac disease in kids born in summer as they are first introduced to gluten at 6 months age in winter, when low vitamin D causes intestinal permeability to increase and let gluten into the bloodstream. http://leakygutresearch.com/vitamin-d/

783275f7d7d5fd8de47977d42fc5f97d

(170)

on June 18, 2013
at 07:45 AM

I do have chronically low vitamin D, had a test done two years ago that found blood value was below 12.5 (the lowest treshold they measure), supplemented for some time but values only creeped up very slowly. Had another test done last month which showed VitD value at 39, so I just started supplementing again and try to be out in the sun whenever I can. How big of a factor is Vitamin D in food intolerance issues?

783275f7d7d5fd8de47977d42fc5f97d

(170)

on June 18, 2013
at 07:43 AM

I'm not supplementing Omega 3 (or anything for that matter), just also getting it from fish. Given that I'm doing AIP, cook with coconut, palm and olive oil and only eat small amounts of nuts, my total PUFA consumption should be on the low side. I do some low-key exercise on a daily basis (walking, cycling, gardening), had some insomnia issues (which have improved in recent weeks since I started watching my magnesium levels), don't do alcohol at all and don't suffer from any real stress.

6120c989fd5b69f42a0834b69b87955b

(24553)

on June 18, 2013
at 03:43 AM

The increase in saturated fat intake also ramps up bile production, so food is better digested before making it further down the digestive tract, which I think helps people a lot.

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1 Answers

1
C8586fa2188272d5474d22aa8a500619

on June 18, 2013
at 03:29 AM

Studies show that any PUFA (both omega 6 and omega 3) increase intestinal permeability while saturated fat reduces it. I believe the success of paleo diet for leaky and food allergies is not in improving the ratio of the two fatty acids, but rather reduction of total PUFA consumption and shift to saturated fat.

This is also in line with my personal experience where supplementing Omega 3 got my symptoms worse. As a consequence I opted out Omega 3 supplementation and only get it from whole fish, processed for short time, at below 150 degrees Celsius (canning process likely oxidizes the Omega 3 in fish like sardines and salmon).

Half a year should definitely make a difference for leaky gut so you are either doing something wrong or it is something else, not leaky gut. What is you status on vitamin D, sleep, alcohol, chronic exercise, stress? People often overlook lifestyle factors that increase permeability that are beyond diet.

Eating autoimmunne paleo (for me meaning no dairy for month, no gluten, alcohol egg whites for life), getting suntan and proper sleep helped me to the extent that my gluten, lactose and fructose intolerance disappeared completely so that I enjoy dairy daily, eat egg whites occasionally and even gluten ingestion no longer triggers the symptoms it used to.

C8586fa2188272d5474d22aa8a500619

(358)

on June 19, 2013
at 05:29 PM

For me vitami D was second biggest contributor causing impaired intestinal barrier (alcohol first). Low Vit D is hypothesized to cause increased celiac disease in kids born in summer as they are first introduced to gluten at 6 months age in winter, when low vitamin D causes intestinal permeability to increase and let gluten into the bloodstream. http://leakygutresearch.com/vitamin-d/

6120c989fd5b69f42a0834b69b87955b

(24553)

on June 18, 2013
at 03:43 AM

The increase in saturated fat intake also ramps up bile production, so food is better digested before making it further down the digestive tract, which I think helps people a lot.

783275f7d7d5fd8de47977d42fc5f97d

(170)

on June 18, 2013
at 07:45 AM

I do have chronically low vitamin D, had a test done two years ago that found blood value was below 12.5 (the lowest treshold they measure), supplemented for some time but values only creeped up very slowly. Had another test done last month which showed VitD value at 39, so I just started supplementing again and try to be out in the sun whenever I can. How big of a factor is Vitamin D in food intolerance issues?

783275f7d7d5fd8de47977d42fc5f97d

(170)

on June 18, 2013
at 07:43 AM

I'm not supplementing Omega 3 (or anything for that matter), just also getting it from fish. Given that I'm doing AIP, cook with coconut, palm and olive oil and only eat small amounts of nuts, my total PUFA consumption should be on the low side. I do some low-key exercise on a daily basis (walking, cycling, gardening), had some insomnia issues (which have improved in recent weeks since I started watching my magnesium levels), don't do alcohol at all and don't suffer from any real stress.

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