3

votes

Why do I so prefer smoked/raw salmon over cooked?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created December 18, 2011 at 8:02 PM

I love smoked salmon. I could eat like 2 pounds of it at a time happily.

However, it only takes a few oz. of cooked salmon to make me not want any more. Why is this?

EDIT: Dear god. I finally tried cooking salmon for myself based on Jenny's advice, and it's possibly the greatest thing I have ever tasted.

Here's my godly recipe:

  • Rub a little olive oil, lemon juice, and salt on a filet (mine was 1 lb)

  • Pan fry both sides on low-medium heat just to the point that the center becomes slightly opaque.

  • Pour on some more lemon juice to taste.

Jenny: Thank you. You have changed my life forever.

96440612cf0fcf366bf5ad8f776fca84

(19463)

on May 04, 2012
at 09:49 AM

Um, fish fat is n3-PUFA, not something you want to oxidize by over cooking, so skin side down, cooked to a crisp isn't a good idea. Better to brown the bottom and let it cook covered skin side up instead.

A4216f1b1e1f5ab3815bd91700905081

(1646)

on May 04, 2012
at 02:15 AM

If you have skin-on salmon, I'd suggest you take that recipe and hack it a little. Cook to the same doneness level, but try to do at least 70% of the cooking with the skin side down. You'll get a nice, crispy texture to further boost the enjoyment of properly prepared salmon.

5ef574d7893bc816ec52e04139e9bc09

(6097)

on December 19, 2011
at 04:07 AM

Cool, I'm gonna try this

5ef574d7893bc816ec52e04139e9bc09

(6097)

on December 19, 2011
at 04:05 AM

Thanks for clearing that up.

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on December 19, 2011
at 12:21 AM

Ahhh, but healthy Omega 3's! :)

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on December 19, 2011
at 12:21 AM

Agree on the cedar plank- it turns out awesome that way. Haven't tried poached in oil- may get flak from the boss.

Medium avatar

(10611)

on December 18, 2011
at 11:05 PM

I barrel smoke batches of fresh coho filets (and kings when the price is right)over a mixture of apple and filbert wood. 250 F takes an hour or so to firm fish, them freeze for eating later. Otherwise I usually gas grill it on foil. I'll poach it sometimes with greens.

518bce04b12cd77741237e1f61075194

(11577)

on December 18, 2011
at 11:04 PM

Mm, yeah, if you brown the butter first it takes salmon through the roof.

518bce04b12cd77741237e1f61075194

(11577)

on December 18, 2011
at 10:55 PM

Haha, last way I love to cook salmon: poached, in olive oil. Heat about 1 c of olive oil (not your best, it's a lot of olive oil!) in a small skillet with high sides. Wait until the olive oil is warm enough that it is aromatic, but not really hot (don't want to hit smoke point). Place a thin salmon filet in and allow to cook slowly and gently until it is pink on the outside, rare in the middle. Use the leftover olive oil for veggies, it will have a little fish-funk-deliciousness in it. So good with little baby tomatoes from the garden, covered with fresh basil.

518bce04b12cd77741237e1f61075194

(11577)

on December 18, 2011
at 10:52 PM

I also LOVE salmon skin, if someone comes over and won't eat theirs, I have no qualms about stealing it right off their plate. It is so oily and delicious. To get the skin nice and crisp, I use a well seasoned cast iron pan. Cook the salmon only with skin side down. Drizzle with some lemon and spices, put a lid on the pan just for a few minutes until it is barely cooked through.

518bce04b12cd77741237e1f61075194

(11577)

on December 18, 2011
at 10:51 PM

Cedar plank is my favourite way- soak a cedar plank (you can soak it in aromatic water ex. with bay leaves, lemon slices, cinnamon sticks etc) overnight. If you forgot to soak it, pour boiling water over it from the kettle and let it soak for a couple hours. Put on the BBQ for 10 minutes until the plank starts to smoke and the BBQ is very hot. Place your salmon (rubbed with garlic powder, S&P) on the plank, and close the BBQ lid. Cook for 10 minutes, check for rare center, then pull off. Best of both worlds: smokey, fresh salmon!

518bce04b12cd77741237e1f61075194

(11577)

on December 18, 2011
at 10:48 PM

In the pan, on a cedar plank, or directly on a seasoned bbq- if you want to bake it, I always brine it first, otherwise it is has an unpleasant texture (bland) and tends to be overdone. The key is to cook it just barely cook it- it should be juicy and red in the center, like how you would cook a steak rare.

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on December 18, 2011
at 09:29 PM

We like our salmon succulent too- do not overcook it! Pull it off the heat just before it is cooked through since it will keep cooking for the next few minutes just like steak does.

5ef574d7893bc816ec52e04139e9bc09

(6097)

on December 18, 2011
at 09:14 PM

So how do you cook it?

  • 5ef574d7893bc816ec52e04139e9bc09

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6 Answers

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5
518bce04b12cd77741237e1f61075194

(11577)

on December 18, 2011
at 08:37 PM

A lot can be attributed to the preparation- most people do not cook fish properly at all, so it is often dry, tough, and has diminished flavour. That makes it easy to not go back after a few bites. Also, who doesn't love the taste of smoke? It is ultra-savory and addictive.

I hate overhearing people talking about cooking fish- usually people have weird, terrible notions on how to cook it. It makes me hurt a little, grew up on the docks and dating a fisherman, we have our salmon just barely cooked, always served with some acid (lemon slices usually) and with crispy skin. Soooo goood...

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on December 18, 2011
at 09:29 PM

We like our salmon succulent too- do not overcook it! Pull it off the heat just before it is cooked through since it will keep cooking for the next few minutes just like steak does.

Medium avatar

(10611)

on December 18, 2011
at 11:05 PM

I barrel smoke batches of fresh coho filets (and kings when the price is right)over a mixture of apple and filbert wood. 250 F takes an hour or so to firm fish, them freeze for eating later. Otherwise I usually gas grill it on foil. I'll poach it sometimes with greens.

5ef574d7893bc816ec52e04139e9bc09

(6097)

on December 18, 2011
at 09:14 PM

So how do you cook it?

518bce04b12cd77741237e1f61075194

(11577)

on December 18, 2011
at 10:55 PM

Haha, last way I love to cook salmon: poached, in olive oil. Heat about 1 c of olive oil (not your best, it's a lot of olive oil!) in a small skillet with high sides. Wait until the olive oil is warm enough that it is aromatic, but not really hot (don't want to hit smoke point). Place a thin salmon filet in and allow to cook slowly and gently until it is pink on the outside, rare in the middle. Use the leftover olive oil for veggies, it will have a little fish-funk-deliciousness in it. So good with little baby tomatoes from the garden, covered with fresh basil.

518bce04b12cd77741237e1f61075194

(11577)

on December 18, 2011
at 10:51 PM

Cedar plank is my favourite way- soak a cedar plank (you can soak it in aromatic water ex. with bay leaves, lemon slices, cinnamon sticks etc) overnight. If you forgot to soak it, pour boiling water over it from the kettle and let it soak for a couple hours. Put on the BBQ for 10 minutes until the plank starts to smoke and the BBQ is very hot. Place your salmon (rubbed with garlic powder, S&P) on the plank, and close the BBQ lid. Cook for 10 minutes, check for rare center, then pull off. Best of both worlds: smokey, fresh salmon!

518bce04b12cd77741237e1f61075194

(11577)

on December 18, 2011
at 10:52 PM

I also LOVE salmon skin, if someone comes over and won't eat theirs, I have no qualms about stealing it right off their plate. It is so oily and delicious. To get the skin nice and crisp, I use a well seasoned cast iron pan. Cook the salmon only with skin side down. Drizzle with some lemon and spices, put a lid on the pan just for a few minutes until it is barely cooked through.

518bce04b12cd77741237e1f61075194

(11577)

on December 18, 2011
at 10:48 PM

In the pan, on a cedar plank, or directly on a seasoned bbq- if you want to bake it, I always brine it first, otherwise it is has an unpleasant texture (bland) and tends to be overdone. The key is to cook it just barely cook it- it should be juicy and red in the center, like how you would cook a steak rare.

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on December 19, 2011
at 12:21 AM

Agree on the cedar plank- it turns out awesome that way. Haven't tried poached in oil- may get flak from the boss.

5ef574d7893bc816ec52e04139e9bc09

(6097)

on December 19, 2011
at 04:07 AM

Cool, I'm gonna try this

2
24df4e0d0e7ce98963d4641fae1a60e5

on December 18, 2011
at 08:36 PM

Oh I don't know, it's yummier?

I love smoked salmon, and salmon sushi is da bomb. The former is usually salty, the latter I eat with tamari/hot pepper oil.

Here's how I cook salmon: (note, it's probably not the best thing for the O3's, but the fish itself doesn't burn much)

I buy skin on fillets, and heat butter and another fat in a pan (olive oil or palm kernel oil usually). I fry the fish skin side down on fairly high heat for like 5 minutes, this crisps up the skin. I use Trader Joe's 21 Seasoning Salute these days, sprinkled on the fish side. When I flip, I peel off crisped skin -- it comes off easily and is delish! I sprinkle fish with more seasoning (a little salt and pepper works well too) and flip. Yum.

Probably a bit of paleo heresy, but salmon needs salt.

1
Cbda678b2a6bf0537d8c4ea0ce8aa9ad

(4319)

on December 18, 2011
at 08:51 PM

No accounting for people's tastes. You might be able to spice up your cooked salmon with, well, spices... thyme, sweet red pepper, hot red pepper, kamun, horseradish, etc

The only smoked Salmon available in my area is Atlantic from the fish farms of Norway. I would not eat that salmon. http://www.salmonfarmmonitor.org/problems.shtml

I have managed to find a source of frozen Pacific Salmon caught in open waters.

Another thing is... at this stage of my life I have realized that food is medicine.... Nowadays, I often consume food products whose taste is somewhat unpleasant.

0
3b0b95dfc6dc5c18e535945f4aab0866

on December 18, 2011
at 11:04 PM

Food reward. Clearly. Tastiness causing you to overeat.

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on December 19, 2011
at 12:21 AM

Ahhh, but healthy Omega 3's! :)

5ef574d7893bc816ec52e04139e9bc09

(6097)

on December 19, 2011
at 04:05 AM

Thanks for clearing that up.

0
Medium avatar

(10611)

on December 18, 2011
at 10:56 PM

Seasoning probably. Wood smoke does a lot for salmon's flavor, which can be very bland if you poach or steam it. Some seasonings for flavorless salmon not already mentioned are tarragon (by itself or in mustard) and melted butter with salt and pepper.

518bce04b12cd77741237e1f61075194

(11577)

on December 18, 2011
at 11:04 PM

Mm, yeah, if you brown the butter first it takes salmon through the roof.

0
07ca188c8dac3a17f629dd87198d2098

(7970)

on December 18, 2011
at 08:42 PM

Someone isn't getting well-cooked cooked salmon.

Also try it with hollandaise. :)

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