1

votes

Most Mayo is bad. Is this one bad as well?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created April 01, 2011 at 9:54 AM

I am using this mayo daily: Front Back Could someone comment on it???s healthyness? I???m eating it like its tasty fish oil right now, I hope i???m not missing some problem with it.

I???m including the (huge) pictures here so you can read the nutritional label, if i should do this in another way please tell me so. It's a Dutch brand of mayo, so that explains the strange language ;)

Edit: here are the ingredients: Vegetable oils (80%), vinegar, barn egg yolk (6%), water, sugar, salt, mustard, preservative (potassium sorbate), flavourings (contains soyaprotein, celery), colour (beta carotene), antioxidant (E385)

Eae382ede8e1cafc842608ffd0d6fdd4

(5)

on October 06, 2011
at 12:41 AM

Its been a while but I never really got the hang of making my own mayonaisse. Recently I was studying fats and thought of something about this. When you look at the Polyunsaturated fats that is the amount of omega 3 and omega 6 combined right? Since the label dóes show omega 3 we should then be able to subtract the 7,1 grams of the omega3's from the 23,5 grams of PUFA's coming up with 16,4 grams of omega6. This would make the ratio about 1:2.3, not great but not lethal either... Does it work that way or am I overlooking something?

Eae382ede8e1cafc842608ffd0d6fdd4

(5)

on April 01, 2011
at 10:50 PM

talking about the eating of raw eggs, I can't see that going over well with my relatives... What is the risk? Salmonella right? Is that deadly? Is that less likely to occur in pastured eggs?

Eae382ede8e1cafc842608ffd0d6fdd4

(5)

on April 01, 2011
at 10:47 PM

@Kent Cowgill: Isn't olive oil also technically a vegetable oil? And advocado oil, and coconut oil for that matter. What makes some vegetables (or are they fruits?) better then others?

Aead76beb5fc7b762a6b4ddc234f6051

(15239)

on April 01, 2011
at 10:30 PM

great recipe! thanks!

Aead76beb5fc7b762a6b4ddc234f6051

(15239)

on April 01, 2011
at 07:07 PM

its not enough acid to kill the bacteria. its just used for flavor and emulsification. dont think that a bit of lemon juice will kill off antyhing bad in there. chances are theres nothing bad in there to begin with, especially if youre using fresh pastured eggs. just know that youre eating raw egg, and if youre cool with that, then enjoy. dont have a false sense of security from the bit of acid. home made mayo really is the easiest and most delicious change you can make! reality is that youre more likely to get sick from your fresh spinach than from a pastured raw egg. just enjoy it.

E7be2ce38158357f5dacae07b43d1b29

on April 01, 2011
at 05:45 PM

It's my understanding that a bit of acid like lemon juice or vinegar is necessary to kill bacteria and help set the mayo. Anyway, I need to get back to making my own. I need to find a low cost, good tasting, non-seed oil though as I don't like the taste of olive oil much, either.

07ca188c8dac3a17f629dd87198d2098

(7970)

on April 01, 2011
at 01:28 PM

Exactly what kind of vegetable oils? That makes a huge difference. Oh wait, nevermind. Vegetable oils aren't good for you.

9aa2a816c61170cc0183a68be0386ba5

(1702)

on April 01, 2011
at 12:59 PM

Good advice, but in my experience olive oil makes horrible mayo - very strong flavor.

Eae382ede8e1cafc842608ffd0d6fdd4

(5)

on April 01, 2011
at 12:06 PM

@Adam Crafter: I should have done that the first time. It's in there now.

Eae382ede8e1cafc842608ffd0d6fdd4

(5)

on April 01, 2011
at 11:35 AM

Ah, yes, I forgot to look at the ingredients. stupid. Here they are: Vegetable oils (80%), vinegar, barn egg yolk (6%), water, sugar, salt, mustard, preservative (potassium sorbate), flavourings (contains soyaprotein, celery), colour (beta carotene), antioxidant (E385) That looks a lot less healthy then I thought it was... I'll be trying to make some of my own, probably today even. I have all the ingredients right here. Thanks for the reply! And thanks for killing my favorite brand of mayo for me ;)

B3c62d89cd47b7d7209b6a99243d0ded

(10778)

on April 01, 2011
at 11:33 AM

Can you post the ingredient list?

B3c62d89cd47b7d7209b6a99243d0ded

(10778)

on April 01, 2011
at 11:32 AM

+1 for well written, good advice. Tasty!

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7 Answers

best answer

10
96440612cf0fcf366bf5ad8f776fca84

(19413)

on April 01, 2011
at 10:48 AM

Why would you not make your own? The above might be fine, might not be fine (probably not as I see high PUFA content on that label, even worse, it doesn't say from what oil), there's nothing there that says what kind of oil they use. Maybe you didn't take a picture of the ingredients.

But that's NOT the problem. Most commercial stuff is going to use transfats, or evil fats such as soy. Don't bother with ANY of it.

Make your own, it's very easy and it will both be tastier and healthier than anything on a shelf. If it's on a shelf, it has to be "shelf-stable" which means it's going to be using some things to make it tasty and prevent it from going rancid - that right there is the red flag that says "It's made with things that will harm your health."

The real stuff (and I don't mean that as a logo) is made with pastured eggs and good oil (such as extra virgin olive oil, or if you don't like the flavor lite olive oil, or macadamia, or hazelnut oil.

If you have a blender or food processor, it's very easy to make your own. You could make it yourself with a whisk, but that's painful. If you don't have a blender, buy one. They're like $30 at most, and you'll certainly be using them to make other stuff too.

Making mayo is super easy and it takes about 5-10 minutes. Far less than it takes you to go to that supermarket.

Get two pastured eggs, raise them to room temperature by putting them in warm water for 5-10 minutes, throw'em in a blender (no shells please), add in a few some extras for flavor (maybe a teaspoon of mustard, maybe some pepper, maybe a touch of seasalt, maybe some garlic, if you like, or a drop of sesame oil -- basically whatever you'd think would taste great - even maybe a drop of tabasco sauce.) turn on the blender on its lowest setting and slowly drizzle in 2 cups of the good olive oil. If you need to, go up to the next speed. If you see it's not incorporating the oil, either mix it from the top with a spoon - careful not to touch the blades, they are spinning after all, or stop adding oil.

Throw it in a glass container and chill it for a few hours in the fridge. You could eat it warm, but it won't be as thick.

Some recipes call for one yolk + one whole egg, but I don't bother with that, I just keep it as simple as possible. Also, you're better off making it when you need it and making less of it than having some big ass jar stay at the back of the fridge for weeks or months.

I promise you, making your own is light years ahead of anything you might buy off a shelf.

Don't be lazy, not only will your arteries and your heart will thank you, but your taste buds will love you.

9aa2a816c61170cc0183a68be0386ba5

(1702)

on April 01, 2011
at 12:59 PM

Good advice, but in my experience olive oil makes horrible mayo - very strong flavor.

B3c62d89cd47b7d7209b6a99243d0ded

(10778)

on April 01, 2011
at 11:32 AM

+1 for well written, good advice. Tasty!

Eae382ede8e1cafc842608ffd0d6fdd4

(5)

on April 01, 2011
at 11:35 AM

Ah, yes, I forgot to look at the ingredients. stupid. Here they are: Vegetable oils (80%), vinegar, barn egg yolk (6%), water, sugar, salt, mustard, preservative (potassium sorbate), flavourings (contains soyaprotein, celery), colour (beta carotene), antioxidant (E385) That looks a lot less healthy then I thought it was... I'll be trying to make some of my own, probably today even. I have all the ingredients right here. Thanks for the reply! And thanks for killing my favorite brand of mayo for me ;)

Eae382ede8e1cafc842608ffd0d6fdd4

(5)

on April 01, 2011
at 10:50 PM

talking about the eating of raw eggs, I can't see that going over well with my relatives... What is the risk? Salmonella right? Is that deadly? Is that less likely to occur in pastured eggs?

E7be2ce38158357f5dacae07b43d1b29

on April 01, 2011
at 05:45 PM

It's my understanding that a bit of acid like lemon juice or vinegar is necessary to kill bacteria and help set the mayo. Anyway, I need to get back to making my own. I need to find a low cost, good tasting, non-seed oil though as I don't like the taste of olive oil much, either.

Aead76beb5fc7b762a6b4ddc234f6051

(15239)

on April 01, 2011
at 07:07 PM

its not enough acid to kill the bacteria. its just used for flavor and emulsification. dont think that a bit of lemon juice will kill off antyhing bad in there. chances are theres nothing bad in there to begin with, especially if youre using fresh pastured eggs. just know that youre eating raw egg, and if youre cool with that, then enjoy. dont have a false sense of security from the bit of acid. home made mayo really is the easiest and most delicious change you can make! reality is that youre more likely to get sick from your fresh spinach than from a pastured raw egg. just enjoy it.

3
2507b557331c8a674bc81197531e609a

(4994)

on April 01, 2011
at 12:33 PM

VEGETABLE OILS 80% !!!!!!!!! No this is not healthy. Vegetable oils are not healthy. Period. Ever.

2
91c2e2a35e578e2e79ce7d631b753879

on April 01, 2011
at 07:01 PM

Mayonnaise

makes about 2 cups

3 yolks at room temperature

1 1/2 tablespoons white wine vinegar

1/2 teaspoon salt

1/4 teaspoon prepared mustard (I use a good Dijon)

1 tablespoon raw honey (optional)

1 3/4 cups light olive oil or avocado oil

Warm the mixing bowl of a stand mixer in hot water; wipe dry and latch on to the mixer. Place the egg yolks in the bowl and attach the paddle attachment. Beat for 1 or 2 minutes until they are thick and sticky.

Add the vinegar, salt, honey and mustard. Beat for 30 seconds more.

Begin adding the oil by drops with a teaspoon, or rest the lip of the measuring cup on the edge of the bowl. Keep your eye on the oil rather than on the mayonnaise. Stop pouring and continue beating every 10 seconds or so, to be sure the egg yolks are absorbing the oil.

After 1/3 to 1/2 cup of oil has been incorporated, the mayonnaise will begin thicken into a very heavy cream. Beat in the remaining oil in a thin, steady stream until it has been completely incorporated. Season to taste.

This will last in the refrigerator at least a week. I think. It's usually gone way before then.

Aead76beb5fc7b762a6b4ddc234f6051

(15239)

on April 01, 2011
at 10:30 PM

great recipe! thanks!

2
84666a86108dee8d11cbbc85b6382083

(2399)

on April 01, 2011
at 12:49 PM

In short, don't eat it.

Vegetable oils, soy protein, ...

1
Medium avatar

(5136)

on April 02, 2011
at 12:04 AM

my favorite mayonnaise - easy to make, cause it doesn't break:

recipe (roughly):

get a large bowl throw in

  • one egg yolk
  • one teaspoon dijon mustard
  • salt
  • pepper
  • squeeze in half a lemon's juice
  • add 1/3 cup real lard (rendered cleared bacon fat or duck fat also do nicely) whisk a lot then add about another 1/4 cup olive oil

    whisk some more.

(i cheat with an electric whisk) very easy... it will need to be re-whisked to bring it back up to consistency when you pull it out of the fridge. the lard is not only good for you, but also cuts the overpowering flavor of olive oil in mayo and makes it taste more like "commercial mayo". i also like to add some truffle flavored olive oil when i'm making the mayo to go with some duck fat fried french fries.

1
B3c62d89cd47b7d7209b6a99243d0ded

on April 01, 2011
at 07:12 PM

Thanks for posting the ingredients... That is too many veggie oils, find something else to love!

1
9aa2a816c61170cc0183a68be0386ba5

on April 01, 2011
at 12:58 PM

Make your own :)

1 cup Macadamia Nut oil or similar (olive oil is a little strong) and 1 egg yolk. WHIP WHIP WHIP!

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