2

votes

If I were to eat the food pyramid to the letter what would be my n3/n6 ratio?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created November 29, 2011 at 3:54 PM

I know that it would be bad, but I've heard that the average American gets a one part Omega 3 to ten parts Omega 6 ratio but I also heard that if you ate the food pyramid to the letter you would actually end up with an even worse ratio of 1:14.

This would mean that the governmental dietary recommendations in this respect are actually worse than the average.

I think I read this somewhere once but I can???t remember the source. Is there any truth to these numbers?

Any quantitative information on the subject would be a bonus. So to clarify??? If I were to eat the food pyramid to the letter what would be my n3/n6 ratio?

Thanks for your help.

Best regards

Nick Kinsella

Aebee51dc2b93b209980a89fa4a70c1e

(1982)

on November 29, 2011
at 04:46 PM

I don't think they are using the pyramid anymore. They are using the "plate."

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3 Answers

4
D1c02d4fc5125a670cf419dbb3e18ba7

on November 29, 2011
at 10:46 PM

I think the technical term for your ratio would be shitty.

2
13a44ea00b0c9af0b6d0f3d5f5c2cfca

(7223)

on November 29, 2011
at 04:35 PM

The food pyramid does not prescribe a set daily menu, so it would be pretty difficult to determine these numbers as it would vary greatly depending on the quality of food used to fulfill the requirements.

You could easily follow the food pyramid while still eating lots of wild caught fish, only grassfed/pastured meats, only pastured milk and eggs, and eschewing industrial seeds oil. Your resulting ratio on that diet could actually end up better than someone eating a paleo diet consisting of CAFO meats, farmed fish, and conventionally produced eggs and dairy. It would all depend on the specifics of what each person eats and where they source their food.

ETA: It occurs to me that the above could be misconstrued as supportive of the food pyramid. That was not my intention at all. I am simply trying to say that there are too many variables in both diets to accurately determine the differences in omega 6/3 ratios.

1
8949bf87b0e0aefcad10f29975e4fa2b

(8989)

on November 29, 2011
at 06:04 PM

Your ratio would be zero, one or indeterminate, depending on your level of math ability. The new plate hasn't room for fats (0/0), unless they are tagging along with other things. My guess is that the omega three is higher than SAD, since fish doesn't seem to be limited, but fatty meats are. Having no oil on the plate means no industrial oils either.

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