3

votes

Cornish game hen- better than regular chicken?

Answered on September 12, 2014
Created October 18, 2011 at 4:50 AM

In Whole Foods, while most poultry receive an animal welfare rating of 1-3, the Cornish game hens are labelled as 5, which according to them means that they're pasture-raised. But does this absolutely guarantee that they're not grain fed? I'm trying to find meats higher in O-3.

D30ff86ad2c1f3b43b99aed213bcf461

on October 18, 2011
at 06:03 PM

I wish that every PaleoHacks question had a checkmarked answer this thorough and complete! :)

F1b39d4f620876330312f4925bd51900

(4090)

on October 18, 2011
at 03:27 PM

I always find the brand name and call them (unless its a local CSA or something). I ask them what their supplemental feed is, since I am trying to avoid Soy fed animals. Guess what, no longer "allergic" to eggs since I found a supplier that doesn't supplement with Soy.

220994a1bcff1923ef0388192bdba8d4

on October 18, 2011
at 03:06 PM

Good to see someone actually knows what they're talking about...

0bc6cbb653cdc5e82400f6da920f11eb

(19235)

on October 18, 2011
at 01:22 PM

My family have always raised and kept a few rare breed chickens in the garden and they used to be my responsibility when I was young. So chickens are a personal interest :)

0bc6cbb653cdc5e82400f6da920f11eb

(19235)

on October 18, 2011
at 01:21 PM

My family have always raised and kept a few rare breed hen in the garden and they used to be my responsibility when I was young. So chickens are a personal interest :)

07ca188c8dac3a17f629dd87198d2098

(7970)

on October 18, 2011
at 12:48 PM

What an informative answer, thank you!

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4 Answers

best answer

8
0bc6cbb653cdc5e82400f6da920f11eb

(19235)

on October 18, 2011
at 08:24 AM

A Cornish Game Hen is not really a breed of chicken, it is more a description of its age when sold in the shops sometimes called a Poussin.

It is a type of Cornish-Rock, the hybrids that are the mainstay of the commercial broiler chicken industry. They are very fast growing hybrids and can produce a small bird for the table in less than a month from hatching with very white meat. Only hybrids of this type would be large enough to sell at a a months age.

"Cornish Game Hen" sounds better on the packet than "Baby Chicken".

As a historical curiously the "Game" in the name was picked because it comes from the ancestry of the original Cornish breed of chickens, also known as Indian Game, developed in Cornwall, England in the 19th Century. Chickens that included the word "Game" in the breed name were muscular breeds that produced cocks that were good for cock-fighting. Now we use those muscular features to provide good chicken legs and breasts for us to eat.

Chickens are not really grazing animals and can only derive a small part of their calories from grass. Bugs will only make up a small part of a chickens diet on pasture when kept in commercially viable numbers.

A large proportion of the diet of for almost all commercialism chickens will be make up of grains of one sort or another whatever type of system the chickens are kept in.

D30ff86ad2c1f3b43b99aed213bcf461

on October 18, 2011
at 06:03 PM

I wish that every PaleoHacks question had a checkmarked answer this thorough and complete! :)

07ca188c8dac3a17f629dd87198d2098

(7970)

on October 18, 2011
at 12:48 PM

What an informative answer, thank you!

0bc6cbb653cdc5e82400f6da920f11eb

(19235)

on October 18, 2011
at 01:22 PM

My family have always raised and kept a few rare breed chickens in the garden and they used to be my responsibility when I was young. So chickens are a personal interest :)

220994a1bcff1923ef0388192bdba8d4

on October 18, 2011
at 03:06 PM

Good to see someone actually knows what they're talking about...

0bc6cbb653cdc5e82400f6da920f11eb

(19235)

on October 18, 2011
at 01:21 PM

My family have always raised and kept a few rare breed hen in the garden and they used to be my responsibility when I was young. So chickens are a personal interest :)

3
32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41757)

on October 18, 2011
at 02:57 PM

Chickens aren't cows, they're designed to eat insects, carrion, grains, grass, etc... They're naturally higher in omega-6 fats than grass-fed cows and fatty fish. Those are the proteins to go after if you want greater omega-3 in your diet. Just eat chicken sparingly.

3
13a44ea00b0c9af0b6d0f3d5f5c2cfca

(7223)

on October 18, 2011
at 09:23 AM

All chickens are fed grains (or on a very, very small farm they might only get kitchen scraps). Unlike cows they actually need them to be a part of their diet. Same goes for pigs. Beef and lamb are the two meats you want to be 100% grassfed. Chicken, turkey, and pork should be pastured and their supplemental feed should be organic and GMO free.

Allowing chickens to roam freely on pasture raises the levels of omega3s in their meat and eggs. When chickens are housed indoors, they have lower levels of omega 3s. At Whole Foods, the level 5 meats are likely to have the highest omega 3 levels.

F1b39d4f620876330312f4925bd51900

(4090)

on October 18, 2011
at 03:27 PM

I always find the brand name and call them (unless its a local CSA or something). I ask them what their supplemental feed is, since I am trying to avoid Soy fed animals. Guess what, no longer "allergic" to eggs since I found a supplier that doesn't supplement with Soy.

0
4e184df9c1ed38f61febc5d6cf031921

(5005)

on October 18, 2011
at 07:13 AM

What IS a Cornish Game Hen? Here in the UK, as far as I know, a cornish chicken is just the same as any other chicken. So what is the difference between a Cornish Game Hen and a regular old chicken???

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