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what are the best kind of olives to eat?

Answered on December 02, 2013
Created December 01, 2013 at 12:38 AM

The supermarket near my workplace has an olive bar. I don't love most olives, but I like kalamata olives. Are they good for you? How many olives should I eat in one serving?

F54a16e4caf4dc8da9ef1369f46a95cd

(591)

on December 01, 2013
at 04:17 AM

This is disappointing news. I had been really looking forward to this place opening. It supposedly would have lots of organic and otherwise healthy options. And it sort of does, but not much in the way of a quick lunch or snack. Thanks for the info.

089dd41b18fbb95ebb5347cded708d98

(5635)

on December 01, 2013
at 03:00 AM

it says on the labels of the olive bar. i can't remember the names. it's usually to preserve the color.

F54a16e4caf4dc8da9ef1369f46a95cd

(591)

on December 01, 2013
at 02:55 AM

What kind of preservatives do they use? How do you know?

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4 Answers

0
9b31524c2da457538b934eb1aff955d8

on December 02, 2013
at 12:40 PM

Different Kinds of Olives are,

  • Cerignola - This enormous olive is sold both green and black. The green variety has a mild and vegetal flavor.

  • Gaeta - Small brownish black olive that can be hard to pit, but the flavor, which is reminiscent of nuts, is worth the effort.

  • Kalamata - A plump, purplish black Greek variety that’s especially popular in U.S. markets and a good choice in most recipes calling for black olives.

  • Nicoise - This small, brownish purple variety grows in southern France. Removing the large pits from these chewy, flavorful olives is hard.

  • Oil-Cured - These wrinkled black olives have a meaty, chewy texture and are often very salty.

  • Sicilian Green - Sometimes called Sicilian Colossals, these oversized olives have a dense, somewhat sour or tart flesh.

Olives are very good for health they are used for many health problems like Cardiovascular benefits, Cancer prevention, Skin and hair health, Bone and connective tissue, Digestive tract health & for Eye.

0
56c28e3654d4dd8a8abdb2c1f525202e

(1822)

on December 01, 2013
at 03:41 AM

I don't think olives have a lot of preservatives. Mostly, they are soaked in brine, and they are just about the most tannic food that people eat commonly (tannins are toxic substances meant to inhibit germs). Home canning for the year is just numerous water changes (often done in the bathtub if you have a lot of olives) to beat down the tannins, plus salt. Spices such as lemon, chili, oregano, are only for flavor. I doubt commercial producers go much farther than brine.

0
Medium avatar

on December 01, 2013
at 03:06 AM

Olives are one of those few plant foods I still eat from a can. Not sure which type are "most healthy" but most olives are very good for you. Just make sure the can has a very short ingredient list with none of the obvious no-no's for your personal Paleo...

I agree with @joanna 4 - the olive bar can not only be full of extra preservatives but could be sitting out for god knows how long. Learn to love canned olives. I usually eat them with a salad but sometimes just plain.

0
089dd41b18fbb95ebb5347cded708d98

(5635)

on December 01, 2013
at 02:01 AM

i personally avoid olive bars because of the preservatives all the olives are soaked in. bleh. i have found plenty of brands on the shelves that don't have those additives so i stick to those. i like kalamatas and green olives. i usually have about 4 at a time.

F54a16e4caf4dc8da9ef1369f46a95cd

(591)

on December 01, 2013
at 02:55 AM

What kind of preservatives do they use? How do you know?

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