2

votes

is cooking with olive oil really that bad?

Answered on September 12, 2014
Created January 10, 2013 at 7:30 PM

i cook my chicken and and beef and shit in my stainless steel pan with olive oil all the time. i've heard it oxidizes and becomes rancid at high heat. i don't like the taste of coconut oil and i try to limit the dairy.

is cooking with olive oil really that bad?

A2c38be4c54c91a15071f82f14cac0b3

(12672)

on January 11, 2013
at 01:34 AM

I hear a lot of people say heating certain oils too much creates trans fats. But just from a chemistry point of view this doesn't make sense to me. Isomerizing a cis fatty acids to a trans fatty acids typically requires several reagents that aren't present while cooking. Heck, the most common methods of hydrogenation (like in margarine production) don't make trans fats from monounsaturated fats, they make saturated fats. I just don't believe the heat of cooking monounsaturated fats will cause any appreciable trans fat production.

3327924660b1e2f8f8fc4ca27fedf2b2

(2919)

on January 10, 2013
at 09:41 PM

Read WAPF recommendations on vegetable oils. They only approve of olive oil and flaxseed and some nut oils as far as non-animal fats go.

32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41747)

on January 10, 2013
at 09:36 PM

Burning olive oil is not the same as oxidizing the lipids. There's a lot of stuff in olive oil that burns/blackens before the lipids start oxidizing.

0b7c3e7fd96005f0b2dfd781e512fc2e

(1237)

on January 10, 2013
at 09:13 PM

Anecdotally, I feel much better since switching from olive oil to coconut oil. Improved digestion, regular bowel movements, better skin, mental clarity, improved mood. Never going back.

B72e976b2df9e7f01315830062a5209c

(1365)

on January 10, 2013
at 08:43 PM

Also get some animal fat and render it down. Beef Tallow, lard, bacon grease... all amazing to fry in.

2fd93e91bb14e641a2bac9c6033e84e2

(1614)

on January 10, 2013
at 08:22 PM

Not answering your question, but I limit dairy now too... but I've found that ghee is super easy to make and is AWESOME for pan-frying. Just another option if you decide to forgo olive oil.

61844af1187e745e09bb394cbd28cf23

(11058)

on January 10, 2013
at 07:46 PM

I'd be more concerned about you cooking shit. Does it go well with olive oil?

Ebb10603524dd22621c1155dd7ddf106

(19150)

on January 10, 2013
at 07:39 PM

I don't think it's *legend*, as it's really easy to burn EVOO on a pan. However, I agree: it's an irrational fear here.

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8 Answers

4
A0c49f398499246c623e6527e9dd5ca2

(548)

on January 10, 2013
at 08:02 PM

For olive oil in general, try to avoid glass bottles and buy cold pressed olive oil in metal containers. The oil's quality will decrease with light exposure. Once the temperature in your olive-oily pan exceeds 160??C/320??F the double carbon bonds will get destroyed and the result will be a fairly high amount of trans-fatty-acids.
It means, you'll destroy especally the oleic acid which are mono-unsaturated. Your cholesterol and heart healty MUFAs will turn into TFAs which seem to cause coronary heart disease and many other heart-related diseases. Look for a more stable fat like coconut oil, tallow, lard, butter, ghee as they don't have a high amount of UFAs and are a lot easier to store and to cook with.

A2c38be4c54c91a15071f82f14cac0b3

(12672)

on January 11, 2013
at 01:34 AM

I hear a lot of people say heating certain oils too much creates trans fats. But just from a chemistry point of view this doesn't make sense to me. Isomerizing a cis fatty acids to a trans fatty acids typically requires several reagents that aren't present while cooking. Heck, the most common methods of hydrogenation (like in margarine production) don't make trans fats from monounsaturated fats, they make saturated fats. I just don't believe the heat of cooking monounsaturated fats will cause any appreciable trans fat production.

3
32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41747)

on January 10, 2013
at 07:37 PM

It's not that bad, though overly concerned folks tend to worry. Less processed, it has natural antioxidants that help prevent excess oxidation. I've yet to see any studies or quantification as to how bad it is. Maybe it's a paleo legend?

Ebb10603524dd22621c1155dd7ddf106

(19150)

on January 10, 2013
at 07:39 PM

I don't think it's *legend*, as it's really easy to burn EVOO on a pan. However, I agree: it's an irrational fear here.

32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41747)

on January 10, 2013
at 09:36 PM

Burning olive oil is not the same as oxidizing the lipids. There's a lot of stuff in olive oil that burns/blackens before the lipids start oxidizing.

0
A11a1df82fcdbddbec55d5334f753a78

on January 10, 2013
at 10:42 PM

An extra virgin olive oil's smoke point is predicated on its Free Fatty Acid content, Oleic Acid quotient, phenolic content, and age. Most of these quotients, with the exception of Oleic Acid, depreciate over time. In other words, the older the extra virgin olive oil is, the less stable it will be under high heat. Typical supermarket extra virgin olive oil smokes and burns at a much lower temperature because of how old it tends to be. Using fresh extra virgin olive oil (extra virgin olive oil within a year of its crush date) will typically offer you greater stability, and of course is more nutritious as well. There are some magnificent specimens with exemplary chemical composition that can be heated up to 450F+. However, if you don't know the unique chemical make-up of a particular extra virgin olive oil, then it is absolutely impossible to know at what temperature it will smoke, except to go ahead and get it smoking. Buying extra virgin olive oil with a crush date (NOT BEST IF USED BY DATE) on the bottle showing it was made less than a year ago goes a long way in mitigating the likelihood that your olive oil is already too oxidized to put under heat.

0
4afe86ce916a499180364969856f95d0

on January 10, 2013
at 10:07 PM

Macadamia nut oil.

0
363d0a0277a8b61ada3a24ab3ad85d5a

(4642)

on January 10, 2013
at 08:45 PM

I rub EVOO on roasts, use a light drizzle on salads occasionally and sometimes to a half and half mixture of EVOO and butter for certain onion sautee recipes, mostly because I like the combined flavor. I also don't like how coconut oil fries up, it almost seems to dry things like sweet plantains and leaves a weird coating on my tongue. I don't think using any borderline item (which I consider EVOO to be) on occasion to be a problem, unless of course you have allergies.

0
7050bbce676dfad74a40ec18387894f4

(601)

on January 10, 2013
at 08:33 PM

You could try Refined coconut oil as it does not have the same taste or scent of virgin.

0
Ebb10603524dd22621c1155dd7ddf106

(19150)

on January 10, 2013
at 07:38 PM

Yes and also absolutely not.

EVOO's smoke point is about 400F +/- 25F. Want to slather a loin chop with it and some herbs and cook at 500? Go for it. However, direct pan frying with it make increase the chance you touch upon that smoke point, as it's a direct heat. For pan frying, stick with coconut oil, which while it's smoke point is 375 +/- 25 officially, it seems to handle direct heat much better.

  • I roasted a goat loin chop rubbed completely with homemade harissa (includes EVOO) at 500F for 11 minutes. Not a hint of smoke or burn, and meat so perfectly rare yet warm.

http://instagram.com/p/USStWgn_Xd/is-cooking-with-olive-oil-really-that-bad? harissa rubbed goat roast loin chop, coconut, sweet potatoes

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