1

votes

What evidence is there that Extra Light Olive Oil is 'adulterated' or oxidized.

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created April 08, 2011 at 4:45 PM

I've heard it claimed that Extra Light Olive Oil is heavily oxidized and is bad for you. I've seen absolutely no evidence for this. The only claim to this effect is that ELOO is a highly processed oil. Fine, but this is not evidence that the finished product is oxidized or contains trans fat or is adulterated. I would like to know if anyone has any actual evidence that ELOO is oxidized or adulterated. This study (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19195840) at least seems to suggest that it is protective against the oxidation of fish oil.

Also, along the same lines, what evidence exists that high oleic varieties of safflower and sunflower oils are adulterated? They are mostly omega-9 monounsaturated oils. I don't really care how intensive the refining process is. I just want to know if there is any real evidence that the finished product contains trans fat or high levels of oxidized oils, or is adulterated.

E7be2ce38158357f5dacae07b43d1b29

on April 10, 2011
at 04:34 AM

I've seen downvotes here over some very benign things, when the reality is that we're all just making this up as we go along. There hasn't been enough research and there are too many variables to make any research definitive, so people vote here on ideology or just what has worked for them alone.

47a42b6be94caf700fce9509e38bb6a4

(9647)

on April 09, 2011
at 11:27 PM

Indeed, the downvote is a mystery. I think this is a good answer.

8f4ff12a53a98f3b5814cfe242de0daa

(1075)

on April 09, 2011
at 03:08 PM

Probably because you had an answer instead of saying "just use beef tallow".

0242b468fe1c97997749db416c92e7ed

(4528)

on April 09, 2011
at 01:17 PM

Downvotes? Really?

5e36f73c3f95eb4ea13a009f4936449f

(8280)

on April 08, 2011
at 11:58 PM

I would add that what's they're saying on Wikipedia isn't necessarily what you're really getting. Found this link when I was searching for more info on ELOO. Very informative, very disappointing what people will do for a buck... http://www.antoniocelentano.com/Antonio-Celentano-Extra-Virgin-Olive-Oil-Fraud-Resources.htm

07ca188c8dac3a17f629dd87198d2098

(7970)

on April 08, 2011
at 05:30 PM

Interested to hear how this gets answered, as I can't stand homemade mayo with EVOO and have switched to its less-paleo-approved ELOO.

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4 Answers

2
0242b468fe1c97997749db416c92e7ed

(4528)

on April 08, 2011
at 07:34 PM

I haven't come across much information about the properties of ELOO as compared to EVOO, but I'm fairly sure it's just filtered to a greater degree, to give it its more neutral taste.

As to the second part of your question, according to lipid biochemistry expert Mary Enig, Sunflower and Safflower oils are both high in omega 6, which are notoriously unstable and easily turned rancid.

From Mary Enig's "The Skinny on Fats" article:

Safflower, Corn, Sunflower, Soybean and Cottonseed Oils all contain over 50% omega-6 and, except for soybean oil, only minimal amounts of omega-3. Safflower oil contains almost 80% omega-6. Researchers are just beginning to discover the dangers of excess omega-6 oils in the diet, whether rancid or not. Use of these oils should be strictly limited. They should never be consumed after they have been heated, as in cooking, frying or baking.

However, (and perhaps this is the high omega-9 monounsaturated oil you were referring to in your question) she goes on to say:

High oleic safflower and sunflower oils, produced from hybrid plants, have a composition similar to olive oil, namely, high amounts of oleic acid and only small amounts of polyunsaturated fatty acids and, thus, are more stable than traditional varieties. However, it is difficult to find truly cold-pressed versions of these oils.

So it's possible these hybrid safflower/sunflower oils might not be so horrible, since they are going to be more stable and less likely to be rancid (though I personally wouldn't bother). According to Mary, you want to look for cold-pressed oils in opaque containers for minimum degradation. That said, she cautions that even though these oils are generally considered to be safe, they should still be used in small quantities.

...Olive oil is the safest vegetable oil you can use, but don't overdo. The longer chain fatty acids found in olive oil are more likely to contribute to the buildup of body fat than the short- and medium-chain fatty acids found in butter, coconut oil or palm kernel oil.

8f4ff12a53a98f3b5814cfe242de0daa

(1075)

on April 09, 2011
at 03:08 PM

Probably because you had an answer instead of saying "just use beef tallow".

E7be2ce38158357f5dacae07b43d1b29

on April 10, 2011
at 04:34 AM

I've seen downvotes here over some very benign things, when the reality is that we're all just making this up as we go along. There hasn't been enough research and there are too many variables to make any research definitive, so people vote here on ideology or just what has worked for them alone.

0242b468fe1c97997749db416c92e7ed

(4528)

on April 09, 2011
at 01:17 PM

Downvotes? Really?

47a42b6be94caf700fce9509e38bb6a4

(9647)

on April 09, 2011
at 11:27 PM

Indeed, the downvote is a mystery. I think this is a good answer.

1
D5550939cb0a89d83c84e817289ba4ed

on April 08, 2011
at 09:31 PM

According to wikipedia EVOO is from the first mechanical pressing and has not been heated above 80F. Any of the light or extra light olive oils can be a mixture of the EVOO and later oils that have been extracted using chemical means along with additonal heat and mechanical pressure. The free fatty acid content also goes up in the lighter oils up to 3% compared to less than 1% for EVOO.

5e36f73c3f95eb4ea13a009f4936449f

(8280)

on April 08, 2011
at 11:58 PM

I would add that what's they're saying on Wikipedia isn't necessarily what you're really getting. Found this link when I was searching for more info on ELOO. Very informative, very disappointing what people will do for a buck... http://www.antoniocelentano.com/Antonio-Celentano-Extra-Virgin-Olive-Oil-Fraud-Resources.htm

1
9aa2a816c61170cc0183a68be0386ba5

on April 08, 2011
at 06:40 PM

I was under the assumption that EVOO is acceptable for consumption in reasonable quantaties as long as it is not heated.

The oxidation happens if you cook with it, which most paleo people will most likely suggest against.

1
5e36f73c3f95eb4ea13a009f4936449f

(8280)

on April 08, 2011
at 05:47 PM

I've seen no evidence, nor have I seen any indications that it was analyzed either. So you'll have to go off of how it's made and general understanding of oils.

First off, define Extra Light Olive Oil and define adulterated. As far as I know, it's one of those wishy washy definitions. There's nothing firm saying X = Extra Light. I've seen it claimed both ways. Highly refined pure olive oil as well as mixtures of oils (Olive + canola/veggie oil/etc).

So, let's look at "highly refined". At it's base, all Extra Light Olive oils are highly refined. Why is it highly refined? Because it's inedible if they don't. They use crap olives and process the wazoo out of it to get rid of the odors/flavor/color. They use filters/heat/whatnot. You you start with crap oil, beat it to a pulp, and come out with something palatable. Is it oxidized from the high heat of processing? Got me, but maybe you should really be concerned about the source than the final product?

For transfats, I don't see anything in the process that would create transfats. Transfats are pretty much solids/soft solids at room temperature (they add hydrogen to vegetable oils at high heat to make them more stable). Not liquids. I suspect that's a bugaboo from some source.

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