6

votes

Why don't more paleo folks recommend high-oleic sunflower oil?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created July 17, 2012 at 2:57 PM

I know that seed oils are usually considered anathema to the Paleo diet because of their high pufa content. However, I'm wondering why more Paleo writers don't recommend high-oleic sunflower oil, given the fact that most seem o.k. w/ olive oil.

I prefer it to olive oil (it is mostly tasteless, whereas olive oil has a distinct flavor). The high-oleic sunflower oil I am using contains only 1g of PUFA per serving (I assume it is all omega-6 linoleic acid), which is not that significant to me. One serving will also net you well over the required amount of vitamin E, which I have been having trouble getting from diet (the highest concentrations seem to be in nuts, etc.).

Another question: what concerns should I have about using it as a cooking oil, oxidation, etc.? I don't cook with olive oil for this reason. I know the smoking point for this stuff is higher than butter or ghee, but should I worry about oxidation?

Thanks.

E9140ef0ca0a76ea14b9ebccad234608

(615)

on January 03, 2013
at 04:13 AM

oh and did you mean "include in a rotation "with" other paleo oils" ? As it didnt make sense that you said to use it exlusively? please correct me if im wrong

E9140ef0ca0a76ea14b9ebccad234608

(615)

on January 03, 2013
at 04:11 AM

thanks for this info, bieng middle eastern ive grown up consuming raw olive oil, and recently found a source for some very high quality unrefined cold pressed artisan sunflower oil. It intrigued me but as im very happy cooking with coconut oil, i wasnt sure about consuming it raw in terms of its profile and benefits. however reading that its similar to olive oil, ill give it a shot . :) Cheers

F31d10b54b31428e189d9b771bf7b1d1

(1439)

on July 18, 2012
at 09:07 PM

MathGirl72, I presume that you are agreeing with me. The seeds existed. The seed oils did not exist separate from the seeds. Therefore, seed oils are suspect.

1296f5fecd084f101d7c5fbe013f07eb

(1213)

on July 18, 2012
at 03:18 AM

I could - I do! I guess I just tend to reach for the pastured ghee more often, unless I'm doing something that lends itself to a coconut flavor. I haven't got around to buying some of the refined stuff.

4b5be253ac1981c690689cab7e4bf06d

(3043)

on July 17, 2012
at 10:28 PM

Okay, wrong use of "neolithic," but I follow a low carbish WAPF/Perfect Health type of paleo diet. If my ancestors were eating it 100 years ago, it is most likely healthier than anything developed in the last 100 years.

4b5be253ac1981c690689cab7e4bf06d

(3043)

on July 17, 2012
at 10:24 PM

Matt, name a neolithic food (lets say, developed in the last 100 years) that is totally healthy. :)

32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41757)

on July 17, 2012
at 09:09 PM

Not really a good reason. After all there are many verboten paleo foods that have tradition and history behind them. As are there very healthful neolithic foods.

584cdd1a2dd83e46b8b76758f4c57b19

(600)

on July 17, 2012
at 08:46 PM

Fantastically said :)

61844af1187e745e09bb394cbd28cf23

(11058)

on July 17, 2012
at 07:02 PM

99% of what we eat today didn't exist in the Paleolithic period. However, seeds, complete with their oil, did.

Ce41c230e8c2a4295db31aec3ef4b2ab

(32556)

on July 17, 2012
at 04:09 PM

Blossom- Just curious, but why wouldn't you use coconut oil for high temp cooking?

0d0842381492a41b2173a04014aae810

(4875)

on July 17, 2012
at 03:05 PM

If this is something you're going to include in your diet regularly, 1g of n6 PUFAs is pretty significant.

  • Dc40ae5d05030b331cbe0d96a45a52d6

    asked by

    (30)
  • Views
    20.6K
  • Last Activity
    1282D AGO
Frontpage book

Get FREE instant access to our Paleo For Beginners Guide & 15 FREE Recipes!

6 Answers

7
4b5be253ac1981c690689cab7e4bf06d

(3043)

on July 17, 2012
at 04:08 PM

I don't use it because it is not a traditionally made fat, and because it is highly processed.

If I could reasonably make it in my kitchen, I will use it. It might take me a while to make olive oil, but I could get olives and press them to make oil. I could make coconut oil if I had coconuts. I cannot do the same with Sunflower.

If you are only eating foods based on their nutritional contents, you are missing the entire point (in my opinion.) The point of eating Paleo/Real Foods is that nutrients in foods work synergisticly with the nutrients in them and what they are eaten with. I dont eat olive oil Just for the monounsaturated fats, or the polypenols or whatever, I eat it because it tastes good and has been eaten for thousands of years.

4b5be253ac1981c690689cab7e4bf06d

(3043)

on July 17, 2012
at 10:28 PM

Okay, wrong use of "neolithic," but I follow a low carbish WAPF/Perfect Health type of paleo diet. If my ancestors were eating it 100 years ago, it is most likely healthier than anything developed in the last 100 years.

584cdd1a2dd83e46b8b76758f4c57b19

(600)

on July 17, 2012
at 08:46 PM

Fantastically said :)

32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41757)

on July 17, 2012
at 09:09 PM

Not really a good reason. After all there are many verboten paleo foods that have tradition and history behind them. As are there very healthful neolithic foods.

4b5be253ac1981c690689cab7e4bf06d

(3043)

on July 17, 2012
at 10:24 PM

Matt, name a neolithic food (lets say, developed in the last 100 years) that is totally healthy. :)

3
32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41757)

on July 17, 2012
at 03:14 PM

I agree, high-oleic sunflower oil is on par with olive oil in terms of fatty acid profile. I think it's OK to include in a rotation with other paleo oils: olive, palm, coconut, butter, animals fats...

Personally I don't use it, because I'm pretty happy with olive oil.

Oxidation and smoke point are different things. Coconut oil in the grand scheme of things as a fairly low smoke point. Medium-chain fatty acids aren't as thermally stable as long-chain fatty acids. Extra virgin olive oil also low smoke point, but that's because of all the phytochemicals still present in the oil. The oil itself is stable, as refined olive oils have much higher smoke points than extra virgin olive oils and even other "cooking" oils.

Oxidation is a chemical reaction of the double bonds present in the oil. Coconut oil, being largely saturated, is largely safe from oxidation. Olive oil does have a significant unsaturated component and should be oxidatively sensitive, but with natural antioxidants, it's surprisingly stable to moderate heat. So when you refine an oil, you remove natural antioxidant content which makes it more oxidatively sensitive.

I'd wager than refined high-oleic sunflower oil isn't as safe against oxidation as something like extra virgin olive oil, because of the removal of natural antioxidants; depsite having a higher smoke point than extra virgin olive oil.

E9140ef0ca0a76ea14b9ebccad234608

(615)

on January 03, 2013
at 04:11 AM

thanks for this info, bieng middle eastern ive grown up consuming raw olive oil, and recently found a source for some very high quality unrefined cold pressed artisan sunflower oil. It intrigued me but as im very happy cooking with coconut oil, i wasnt sure about consuming it raw in terms of its profile and benefits. however reading that its similar to olive oil, ill give it a shot . :) Cheers

E9140ef0ca0a76ea14b9ebccad234608

(615)

on January 03, 2013
at 04:13 AM

oh and did you mean "include in a rotation "with" other paleo oils" ? As it didnt make sense that you said to use it exlusively? please correct me if im wrong

2
1296f5fecd084f101d7c5fbe013f07eb

(1213)

on July 17, 2012
at 03:41 PM

Others answered with regard to oxidation, so I'll answer with regard to usage. I keep a bottle in the fridge and use it for those rare times I make mayo (I do 50% olive oil and 50% sunflower oil). It is a good sub for the usual oils in mayo (canola, soybean) and cuts down on the grassy, vegetal, or floral taste of EVOO (I'd rather not use "light" olive oil - I don't trust it!). Also, if I'm out of bacon fat, ghee, or tallow I might use it for high temperature cooking. Rare occasions, but they happen. I don't make mayo all that often, and I keep a stockpile of gheea

Edited to add: I thought about it, and I made mayo once in seven months - for a Fourth of July potato salad.

1296f5fecd084f101d7c5fbe013f07eb

(1213)

on July 18, 2012
at 03:18 AM

I could - I do! I guess I just tend to reach for the pastured ghee more often, unless I'm doing something that lends itself to a coconut flavor. I haven't got around to buying some of the refined stuff.

Ce41c230e8c2a4295db31aec3ef4b2ab

(32556)

on July 17, 2012
at 04:09 PM

Blossom- Just curious, but why wouldn't you use coconut oil for high temp cooking?

2
C45d7e96acd83d3a6f58193dbc140e86

on July 17, 2012
at 03:08 PM

First off, smoke point and oxidation are not necessarily the same thing. Mono and Poly oils can and will oxidize long before smoking while cooking. Also, only the kind made through solvent extraction is good for high heat cooking.

1
F31d10b54b31428e189d9b771bf7b1d1

on July 17, 2012
at 04:21 PM

The red flag goes up with seed oils because they never existed in the paleolithic period.

61844af1187e745e09bb394cbd28cf23

(11058)

on July 17, 2012
at 07:02 PM

99% of what we eat today didn't exist in the Paleolithic period. However, seeds, complete with their oil, did.

F31d10b54b31428e189d9b771bf7b1d1

(1439)

on July 18, 2012
at 09:07 PM

MathGirl72, I presume that you are agreeing with me. The seeds existed. The seed oils did not exist separate from the seeds. Therefore, seed oils are suspect.

1
4781cf8ae1bfcb558dfb056af17bea94

(4359)

on July 17, 2012
at 03:18 PM

I agree with your conclusion that high oleic sunflower might be a good compromise oil for high temp cooking. It's not the best for bulk calories (so I wouldn't deep fry in it) because even 1 gram (which could be 1.4 rounded down anyway) out of, probably, 14 can add up to lots of PUFAs. That said, it and even high temp peanut oil aren't as bad as people think.

Answer Question


Get FREE instant access to our
Paleo For Beginners Guide & 15 FREE Recipes!