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What is Considered a High PUFA food?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created July 09, 2013 at 2:08 PM

I am aware of the need to avoid excessive polyunsaturated fats in foods. I was just wondering what exactly is considered a high PUFA food?

Eggs and poultry are high in PUFA compared to beef or lamb. Would they be considered a PUFA food? Do they need to be moderated?

Or are high PUFA foods only referring to vegetable oils like canola and soybean oil?

Medium avatar

(10611)

on July 09, 2013
at 08:50 PM

Well there goes the sack of nuts from the vending machine....unless I have a chaser of a quart of coconut oil to wonk the percentage...ratios make no sense in a vacuum...

32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41747)

on July 09, 2013
at 06:38 PM

Thinking like a Grok (which I hate doing, but it works), you're not going to find piles of hyper-palatable nuts just lying around everyday. An ounce of nuts is a significant amount, a few ounces quickly because diet distorting.

32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41747)

on July 09, 2013
at 06:37 PM

Jaminet's 4% figure for PUFA also seems too low. You're forgoing most non-ruminant fats to achieve that. As well as eating nothing but coconut oil. An unrealistic diet, in my opinion.

32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41747)

on July 09, 2013
at 06:35 PM

I don't think the absurdly low omega ratios (<4:1) is evolutionarily realistic. Plants are nearly all biased significantly to omega-6s. Animals, aside from ruminants, are rich in PUFA, specifically omega-6s (because they eat mostly PUFAs).

72cf727474b8bf815fdc505e58cadfea

on July 09, 2013
at 03:36 PM

This is usually a levelheaded position, but I'm not sure if it applies here. It's pretty easy to get a n-6:n-3 ratio of 10 or higher just by eating nuts a couple of times a day. Do you think that (probably-unoxidized) n-6 from nuts is actually innocuous, or just that you need a ratio even higher than that to cause problems? (or that eating a couple of servings of nuts each day counts as significantly distorting your diet?)

Medium avatar

(10611)

on July 09, 2013
at 02:30 PM

More paleo urban mythology....once more worried about wonking the macros. The obesity problem is connected to eating sacks of chips and pastries chock full of pufa soybean oil, not the o3/o6 ratio in eggs. While the scare tactics drive people away from bad foods, they'll come back when they find out the tactics were disingenuous.

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3 Answers

1
32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41747)

on July 09, 2013
at 02:13 PM

Only refined isolated omega-6 PUFAs are problematic in my opinion. You can't really overeating omega-6 PUFA from whole foods, without significantly distorting one's diet.

32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41747)

on July 09, 2013
at 06:35 PM

I don't think the absurdly low omega ratios (<4:1) is evolutionarily realistic. Plants are nearly all biased significantly to omega-6s. Animals, aside from ruminants, are rich in PUFA, specifically omega-6s (because they eat mostly PUFAs).

32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41747)

on July 09, 2013
at 06:38 PM

Thinking like a Grok (which I hate doing, but it works), you're not going to find piles of hyper-palatable nuts just lying around everyday. An ounce of nuts is a significant amount, a few ounces quickly because diet distorting.

Medium avatar

(10611)

on July 09, 2013
at 02:30 PM

More paleo urban mythology....once more worried about wonking the macros. The obesity problem is connected to eating sacks of chips and pastries chock full of pufa soybean oil, not the o3/o6 ratio in eggs. While the scare tactics drive people away from bad foods, they'll come back when they find out the tactics were disingenuous.

72cf727474b8bf815fdc505e58cadfea

on July 09, 2013
at 03:36 PM

This is usually a levelheaded position, but I'm not sure if it applies here. It's pretty easy to get a n-6:n-3 ratio of 10 or higher just by eating nuts a couple of times a day. Do you think that (probably-unoxidized) n-6 from nuts is actually innocuous, or just that you need a ratio even higher than that to cause problems? (or that eating a couple of servings of nuts each day counts as significantly distorting your diet?)

32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41747)

on July 09, 2013
at 06:37 PM

Jaminet's 4% figure for PUFA also seems too low. You're forgoing most non-ruminant fats to achieve that. As well as eating nothing but coconut oil. An unrealistic diet, in my opinion.

0
8d3cb0be5f31c75a05f853cb3b5c245a

(1601)

on July 09, 2013
at 04:04 PM

As far as I know, it's recommended to avoid common oils that contain high amounts of PUFAs ,like corn, cottonseed, safflower, soybean, sunflower and sesame oils.

However, there is some room for debate on say, sunflower and sesame oils. The point is, you shouldn't be deep frying things in them (although they do in spain in sunflower oil) or dousing your food in them. For example, I like sesame oil, but I use it occasionally as a seasoning.

Nuts, and I would even say fish oil can be sources of too much.

Don't stuff yourself on "paleo-friendly" treats such as paleo bread with tons of almond flour, almond biscuits, cookies. etc.

There are worries when you eat too many polyunsaturated fats with fructose (per the Perfect Health Diet and other blogs/papers) because of advanced glycation end-products (AGE's).

http://inhumanexperiment.blogspot.com/2009/10/fats-and-ages-pufas-are-even-worse-than.html

AGE's can result in liver spots.

Another good link: http://www.marksdailyapple.com/is-it-primal-sunflower-oil-wheat-germ-skyr-and-other-foods-scrutinized/#axzz2YTnAJe00 (Read the section on sunflower oil)

Read more on sources of pufa's: http://www.livestrong.com/article/382205-foods-high-in-polyunsaturated-fat/#ixzz2YZ2YX04L

The point is, everything in moderation. Some nuts here, not binging, perhaps even some sunflower oil (cold-pressed), etc. Also, you want to ideally get your omega-3 to omega-6 ratio in balance, but if you overdose on omega-6 it's probably not a good idea to down a ton of fish oil to "counter" it.

If you follow perfect health diet conclusions - less chicken or pork (limit to once per week or twice per week), rely more on beef/lamb which are lower omega-6, and try to eat shellfish, salmon or seafood like mussels once-twice per week, you're likely to be better off. It's easier that way, less to think about it, especially if you're unable to find grass-fed, or pastured. but I still do recommend seeking those out.

I highly recommend their book for an exploration of this issue- omega-6 and omega-3 are essential fatty acids, but that name is misleding because our body can make them! Also check out their blog about omega-6 inducing greater hunger. http://perfecthealthdiet.com/2011/01/why-we-get-fat-food-toxins/

But you have to consider the context - are you deep-frying or just for salad dressing, or even are you using a rancid oil/how was it expelled (and are you cooking at a temp which poly-unsaturated fats are much more likely to be unstable and break down).

Because you don't know how old the oil is, sometimes it's safer to use beef tallow, lard, goose fat, butter, etc. for cooking. they are more stable.

Eat real food - like the perfect health diet food apple, and you should be ok.

0
048dd52752c45129c1212bfffb37ca72

on July 09, 2013
at 02:13 PM

Acording to the Jaminets, no more than 4% aprox. of daily calories should come from PUFA, and considering the ideal omega 6 to omega 3 ratio of 4:1 to 1:1 ... you can do your numbers.

Medium avatar

(10611)

on July 09, 2013
at 08:50 PM

Well there goes the sack of nuts from the vending machine....unless I have a chaser of a quart of coconut oil to wonk the percentage...ratios make no sense in a vacuum...

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