1

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So, what ARE the seed oils?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created March 30, 2012 at 12:46 PM

Is there a list somewhere of seed oils? I keep reading on Paleo sites that seed oils shouldn't be used. What does this include? I'm assuming like soybean, etc. I also know that, obviously, seed oils come from seeds, but I'm looking for further clarification What about things like flax oil (I know it easily goes rancid, so flax seeds are preferred), or grapeseed oil? I understand there to be lots of benefits of grapeseed oil, is that not true? What about sesame oil? I used to use it occasionally for stir-frys, and I LOOOVE hot sesame oil as a topping for just about anything. I use maybe 1-2 teaspoons of the hot sesame oil at a time; and probably about 3-4 tablespoons in a huge (like 4-6 servings) stir fry.

I primarily use coconut oil, butter, and bacon fat. I use olive oil and almond oil in salads too. I'm just curious about different types and which are "Paleo" or not..

Thanks!

32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41757)

on February 24, 2013
at 03:13 PM

Shoo spammer...

Ebb10603524dd22621c1155dd7ddf106

(19150)

on March 31, 2012
at 12:37 PM

Soy (beans) are the seeds of the soy bean plant; rice or corn is the seed of the rice/corn grain plant. They are not commonly referred to as seeds, but rather the type of plant that they are, as opposed to plants like sunflower or sesame, which we regularly refer to the edible portions as seeds. For the sake of oil, for eg, corn oil is never referred to as a seed oil, only as a vegetable or grain oil; soy is similar.

Medium avatar

(10611)

on March 31, 2012
at 12:52 AM

?how are soy, corn, and rice not seeds?

78cb3c4f70de5db2adb52b6b9671894b

(5519)

on March 30, 2012
at 07:34 PM

I LOVE sesame oil.

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4 Answers

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5
Ebb10603524dd22621c1155dd7ddf106

(19150)

on March 30, 2012
at 01:45 PM

Soybean is a grain/legume oil. Just like rice bran oil would be a grain oil. Corn oil as well. Peanut oil is a legume oil.

Seed oil is by definition from seeds. Indeed, flax is a seed (it's other name is linseed). Grapessed oil ... well, that one is pretty clear, too. :-) Indeed, sesame oil is from sesame seeds. Canola is also known as rapeseed.

It might get tricky when you find a new nut or fruit oil (e.g. macadamia or olive oil), but a little research should help you figure that out quickly. There may be an exhaustive list out there, but it will change over time as industry creates new oil by products it tries to feed us.

This chart gives a pretty good breakdown of healthy oils v. not so healthy oils, and you may find it helpful.

I wouldn't fret too much about using some seed oils sometimes - although, I'd stick with sesame oil (or tahini) solely for flavor when you want it.

Medium avatar

(10611)

on March 31, 2012
at 12:52 AM

?how are soy, corn, and rice not seeds?

Ebb10603524dd22621c1155dd7ddf106

(19150)

on March 31, 2012
at 12:37 PM

Soy (beans) are the seeds of the soy bean plant; rice or corn is the seed of the rice/corn grain plant. They are not commonly referred to as seeds, but rather the type of plant that they are, as opposed to plants like sunflower or sesame, which we regularly refer to the edible portions as seeds. For the sake of oil, for eg, corn oil is never referred to as a seed oil, only as a vegetable or grain oil; soy is similar.

1
4b5be253ac1981c690689cab7e4bf06d

(3043)

on March 30, 2012
at 01:46 PM

Seed oils are those that come from a seed.

Most of the time they are to be avoided, because most diets contain too much Omega-6 fats. Emphasizing saturated and Omega-3 fats balances the 3-6 ratio. In addition, seed oils are quick to go rancid, or must be highly processed, chemically extracted, and/or deodorized in order to be edible.

Flaxseed oil contains Omega 3 fatty acids, but these are different than those found in grass fed and wild animals, and may be harder to process. Grapeseed oil might be okay, as long as you get cold pressed, and not the chemically extracted version. I'd rather put my money towards more butter :)

I eat Sesame Oil, but this is usually used in such small quantities it is fine. Mary Eng, in Nourishing Traditions, suggests an equal blend of coconut, olive, and sesame oil for cooking. Otherwise, I usually stick with grass fed butter and coconut oil for cooking, and olive oil for finishing.

78cb3c4f70de5db2adb52b6b9671894b

(5519)

on March 30, 2012
at 07:34 PM

I LOVE sesame oil.

0
C0ddf5f88d3d0cfab0c5d875b0eae9ec

on January 21, 2013
at 05:33 PM

Just like anything else, there are good and bad.

Seed oils are what keep the seed viable, alive and preserve the germ for when the seed is planted.

Pumpkin seed oil is highly medicinal, and used for a variety of health issues bladder, prostate, kidney stones, IBS, and colitis. I wouldn't throw it in with Canola or Rape.

Camelina "The Better Flax" has one of the highest naturally occurring Vitamin E contents of any oil. It has Alpha and Gamma Tocopherols. This allows it to last on the shelf for 2 yrs or more, without refrigeration.

Here is a site that has more info.

Seedoilcompany.com

-1
07142de48753ff4412a28d6fdca96acd

on February 24, 2013
at 04:24 AM

Also check http://www.SeedOils.com for more info about the GOOD seed oils: pumpkin, flax, coriander, etc.

32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41757)

on February 24, 2013
at 03:13 PM

Shoo spammer...

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