2

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Salmon Parfried in Veg. Oil?

Answered on September 12, 2014
Created July 04, 2010 at 6:38 PM

Hey guys, I've been eating these salmon burgers from costco, but I was wondering whether they're more harm than good.

Here's the ingredient list: Pink Salmon, Water, Non-GMO Canola Oil, Contains 2% or less of the following: Lemon Juice from Concentrate, Kosher Salt, Onion, Garlic, Spice, Natural Smoke Flavor, Natural Flavor, Vegetable Extractives, Color added. Parfried in Vegetable Oil (Soybean or Canola Oil.) Contains: Fish (Salmon)

They have quite a bit of Omega-3's, but should I stay away?

Thanks!

P.S., here is the link to them: http://www.tridentseafoods.com/retail/products.php?id=537

05de181d71c1df6304a03566fe821d4b

(795)

on September 18, 2012
at 11:18 AM

ohh yum rancid canola and soybean oil fried farmed salmon, sounds delicious

C79a5b43dfc5749200bd9dcaa6bb0858

on February 20, 2012
at 10:26 PM

Ha, it better f'ing contain fish!

F77c6462cf6596fe6dabeeb5931821ab

(365)

on August 10, 2011
at 11:46 PM

@Rose feel free to copy+paste! =] I'm sorry I don't understand the Alice's Salmon reference? update: they wrote back already! Here's a snippet: "We are continually incorporating consumer feedback to build improvements into our existing products and to help guide us when creating new ones. I will be forwarding your message on to several key department staff members throughout our organization."

F77c6462cf6596fe6dabeeb5931821ab

(365)

on August 10, 2011
at 11:44 PM

@waywardsister I think that's for allergy purposes.

Fe535c4994ac6176f76e1ff6d29eb08a

(4286)

on August 10, 2011
at 08:17 PM

"Color added" makes me definitely think farmed fish, as with fresh wild you dont need to add color and they are dark red/orange as opposed to the pink you usually see from the farm.

3aea514b680d01bfd7573d74517946a7

(11996)

on August 10, 2011
at 06:10 PM

Nice letter! Makes me want to write one, too. Maybe we can start an "Alice's Salmon" movement. ;D

Cfccbcf3450ac4919311ded8ef162d49

(2312)

on July 06, 2010
at 01:11 AM

I buy online wild caught fish these days. :-)

C1fb8666b1ae085507a76a4c494e4f0a

on July 05, 2010
at 11:58 PM

I love that it says "Contains: fish"

1a8020e101199de55c1b3b726f342321

(1973)

on July 05, 2010
at 09:44 PM

Sounds like processed food to me.

4b97e3bb2ee4a9588783f5d56d687da1

(22923)

on July 05, 2010
at 01:10 AM

I ate them pre paleo, it's the hot-dog of the salmon

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8 Answers

3
F77c6462cf6596fe6dabeeb5931821ab

(365)

on August 10, 2011
at 06:07 PM

Hi memostotle, I was concerned with this myself and just shot [email protected] an email:

Hi Trident Seafoods,

I am a frequent purchaser of your wild Alaskan salmon patty product from Costco. I love the fact that this product uses wild Alaskan as opposed to the environmentally-damaging and unhealthy farmed Atlantic variety. However, I recently noticed that this product is par-fried in canola oil. One of the reasons why I choose to eat salmon is for its omega-3 content. Omega-3 fatty acids help to counterbalance the inflammatory effects of omega-6 fatty acids. But when you par-fry a salmon patty in canola oil, which is high in omega-6, it kind of defeats the purpose.

Perhaps a better alternative would be to par-fry it in coconut oil? In addition to its low omega-6 content, coconut oil is a very shelf-stable product, resistant to oxidation unlike canola and other seed oils. Plus, it is currently a darling health food and would be something you can boast about on the label. Thank you.

Sincerely,

Mountain

3aea514b680d01bfd7573d74517946a7

(11996)

on August 10, 2011
at 06:10 PM

Nice letter! Makes me want to write one, too. Maybe we can start an "Alice's Salmon" movement. ;D

F77c6462cf6596fe6dabeeb5931821ab

(365)

on August 10, 2011
at 11:46 PM

@Rose feel free to copy+paste! =] I'm sorry I don't understand the Alice's Salmon reference? update: they wrote back already! Here's a snippet: "We are continually incorporating consumer feedback to build improvements into our existing products and to help guide us when creating new ones. I will be forwarding your message on to several key department staff members throughout our organization."

1
6a439f57ce14a994227dff75d7d232c0

on August 08, 2010
at 01:50 PM

You need to know whether it is farmed salmon, Atlantic salmon or wild salmon. Wild salmon is your best bet. A lot of questions have raised about the toxicity of Atlantic salmon and farmed salmon. Also, farmed salmon doesn't have as much A

All sockeye is wild; they cannot farm that species. Farmed salmon is much inferior to wild salmon, both in terms of omega-3 content and toxic load. Another interesting fact about sockeye is that it eats lower on the food chain, consuming mainly insects and algae, so it accumulates fewer environmental toxins than other species of salmon. ???What about farmed versus wild? Well, the report that most refer to is the 2003 study done by the Environmental Working Group. EWG tested farm salmon and found that "seven of 10 farmed salmon purchased at grocery stores in Washington D.C., San Francisco and Portland, Ore., were contaminated with polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) at levels that raise health concerns." Additionally a study published in the journal Science in 2004 analyzed more than 2 metric tons of farmed and wild salmon from around the world and found that the concentrations of PCBs were "significantly higher in farmed salmon than in wild. European-raised salmon have significantly greater contaminant loads than those raised in North and South America." To be extra careful, trim the skin and fat, and grill or broil your salmon to reduce excess fat, which is where PCBs are stored.??? (Charles Stuart Platkin, ???Salmon Should Be A Dinner Staple,??? The Daily Journal, June 21, 2010) Also, take a look at http://www.order-salmon.com/salmon-global-warming-salmon-climate-change.php

Fe535c4994ac6176f76e1ff6d29eb08a

(4286)

on August 10, 2011
at 08:17 PM

"Color added" makes me definitely think farmed fish, as with fresh wild you dont need to add color and they are dark red/orange as opposed to the pink you usually see from the farm.

1
7df8f3cc7f1475c3ecbbd4a4feb87d04

(514)

on July 04, 2010
at 08:15 PM

Besides the canola oil, I wonder about the quality of the salmon itself. You really want to go for the wild-caught, otherwise I think it might not have as many omega-3s as you hope. It's telling that they have to add color to it. If it's missing color, why wouldn't it be missing the nutrients that salmon is naturally supposed to have as well.

Cfccbcf3450ac4919311ded8ef162d49

(2312)

on July 06, 2010
at 01:11 AM

I buy online wild caught fish these days. :-)

1
667f6c030b0245d71d8ef50c72b097dc

(15976)

on July 04, 2010
at 08:01 PM

if you are regular eating it i would say its going to be trouble. Once in while it'd be fine. I do that with TJ's marinated rack of lamb. beautiful meat but ive noticed that in the marinade is the same as what you mentioned - canola oil. So i only eat it once a month, at the most. In the case of your mealsize burgers though, id err on the side of caution and ditch them. Homemade will taste better anyway!

1
Cfccbcf3450ac4919311ded8ef162d49

(2312)

on July 04, 2010
at 07:42 PM

I agree with just making your own. It really isn't much harder than making a regular burger. Who really knows how healthy/unhealthy processed vegetable oils are - but they are processed quite a bit, so I stay away as much as I can.

1
2b8c327d1296a96ad64cdadc7dffa72d

on July 04, 2010
at 07:25 PM

you're better off making your own. However, if this gets you to eat fish if you normally wouldn't, "doctor" it up to make it better.

1
4b97e3bb2ee4a9588783f5d56d687da1

on July 04, 2010
at 07:21 PM

Canola and Veg Oil are very Bad. In addition, the heavy processing of those Burgers helps oxidation(bad).

I'd find a different solution

4b97e3bb2ee4a9588783f5d56d687da1

(22923)

on July 05, 2010
at 01:10 AM

I ate them pre paleo, it's the hot-dog of the salmon

0
A0843083b9642a8af1005af99b09ce42

on July 04, 2010
at 07:20 PM

Many vegetable oils do more harm than good. You could just make your own salmon burgers. When I find an interesting food item I'd like to try, I look at the ingredients, replace bad ones with healthy choices and make my own recipe.

Here is a link on the canola oil http://www.westonaprice.org/know-your-fats/559-the-great-con-ola.html

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