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How do I get my food to be fatty?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created March 08, 2012 at 4:56 AM

I tried to broil some Applegate grassfed beef patties yesterday with mushrooms and onions. The food came out alright but I'm having a hard time getting the fat into the food. I ended up with some oily food but still a lot of liquid in the tray, composed probably partly from the meat itself but also the tallow, coco oil, and ghee I basted on top. What else can I do? Should I just try to make a sauce out of it and if so how would I go about doing so? No one likes to eat a spoon full of grease :)

D13278772f6612432bf53413fad4e7af

(801)

on March 09, 2012
at 02:35 AM

Those "tree tops" are called florets.

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12 Answers

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1
Fc6a9e07f6056d465573c8969d3a2ddd

(370)

on March 08, 2012
at 11:29 PM

You can make the fat more palatable by making a pan sauce, usually incorporating some alliums (shallots are traditional, onions and garlic work well too), deglazing with a flavorful liquid (such as wine or stock), reducing a bit, and mounting with butter (if you want yet more fat). That's the general procedure, specific recipes will have specific instructions. If it's too much fat for a pan sauce, you can start with a roux by cooking a little flour in the fat, and then adding the liquid.

3
B3c62d89cd47b7d7209b6a99243d0ded

on March 08, 2012
at 08:39 PM

You could try 'larding'... the practice of cutting pork fat into long strips and threading it through steaks with a needle. Now that is how to add cooking fat INTO meat!

No really! http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Larding#Larding

2
Df6dabaf4b1ef3d5db980ad64c501a5b

on March 08, 2012
at 10:35 AM

Hollandaise is a tasty way to up your fat intake.

2
31381cfeb5d6da6fc75f80ab68e041ea

(560)

on March 08, 2012
at 10:11 AM

this is what compound butter is made for!

2
6120c989fd5b69f42a0834b69b87955b

(24553)

on March 08, 2012
at 09:42 AM

Pan drippings are a delightful addition to your meal. I cook it down a little if there is a lot of liquid, and just pour it liberally over my entire plate of veggies and meat. Broccoli can sop up an amazing amount of sauce, and potatoes if you are into them are practically a black hole for drippings.

If you have a lot of brown bits stuck to the pan, you can deglaze it a good splash of wine or water, and then go to town scraping up all the brown stuff and turn up the heat cooking it down to a nice sauce, yum, yum.

If you are trying to up your fat intake in general osso buco is freakin' amazing. Here's a paleo version with lamb: http://www.paleoeffect.com/recipes/paleo-osso-buco-a-tender-leg-of-lamb-entree/

2
77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on March 08, 2012
at 06:18 AM

I don't like coconut oil and I am allergic to dairy so I just add a couple of dessert spoons of tallow or lard to the meat after the meat is cooked.

1
518bce04b12cd77741237e1f61075194

(11577)

on March 08, 2012
at 08:21 PM

Yeah, you'd be surprised how much of that fat actually gets carried by the food your eating- it doesn't take as much as you think to increase the fat in your diet! Deglazing and creating a sauce is my favourite option, but you don't always have time for that. In that case, I add an avocado to the meal, or let the veggies really soak up some fat so there are tasty without being greasy- roasting broccoli in butter/coconut oil is really fantastic, lots of lush fat in the "tree top" (there has to be a better name, I feel five years old for calling the top part of broccoli that) that gets trapped and is delicious. Roasting meats and vegetables in fats is also great, make sure you get a good, crispy texture going and it won't feel greasy. To cut the grease-y feel of a meal, it goes a long way to serve it with some kind of acid component- fresh lime or lemon, a dressing with apple cider vinegar etc. Stews are also rich in fat without being unappealing, and if you have a slow cooker nothing could be easier!

D13278772f6612432bf53413fad4e7af

(801)

on March 09, 2012
at 02:35 AM

Those "tree tops" are called florets.

1
87b7d250ea30415ed4c1afd809f4053f

on March 08, 2012
at 02:10 PM

I mush up avocado ( and chop in a little tomato and onion) with a splash of avocado oil, apple cider vinegar and pepper) and pop it on top of the meat. Tastes Delic! And you get the extra good fats without the oiliness.

1
32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41747)

on March 08, 2012
at 12:56 PM

How much fat did you try to add? There's obviously a limit as to now much you can get to stick to veg without having it all sitting in a pool of melted fat. Maybe 1-2 tbsp for a pan of sauteed veg.

1
1a98a40ba8ffdc5aa28d1324d01c6c9f

(20378)

on March 08, 2012
at 05:02 AM

Add the ghee at the end after the food is on your plate. Or just use butter for that... Or make a sauce and place it on top of the food...

0
7bf306ada57db47547e9da39a415edf6

(11214)

on March 08, 2012
at 08:42 PM

For lunch I've brought in rather lean meats and then put butter, ghee, or red palm oil on top. At room temperature, especially during the cold months, it works fine. Imagine the fat is icing. It is rather hard to eat a tablespoon of butter by itself, but spread on meat, it becomes pleasant.

0
Bdc6244bdbd664d2168a8e326018ffbe

(431)

on March 08, 2012
at 10:16 AM

Well, I like to eat a spoonful of grease, honestly! As long as its coconut oil mixed with cocoa and salt. I find this much yummier than fatty meat.

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