5

votes

How bad is Canola Oil?

Commented on December 10, 2014
Created November 01, 2010 at 3:03 AM

How bad is canola oil? Most canola oil is genetically modified. Some is processed using hexane. But it is possible to obtain organic (not genetically modified) canola that is made using only pressure and mild heat (around 100 degrees F which is well below its smoke point). Rapeseed in it's natural version has toxins, but crossbreeding in the 60s (not GMO) was able to produce strains with very little toxin. Many other types of veggies have been similarly cross bred over many generations and are commonly eaten despite low levels of some toxins. The toxins in the canola version of rapeseed are the same toxins that exist in low levels in other mustard plants of the same family like kale, broccoli, etc so it's not like we don't already eat it at times. Canola oil can be extracted from the seed using only mild heat and pressure. No chemicals, bleaching or deodorizing is needed as far as I can tell. Unlike other seed oils, Canola has a good omega 3/6 ratio. It's 32% PUFA but mostly MUFA. Canola will certainly not be on my list of super healthy foods, but I do wonder if a little bit once in a while may not be worth worrying about. The only reason I am thinking about it at all is because there are some very tasty salad dressings made with canola. Opinions? Have I forgotten something? (yes, I know, it's a seeeeeeeeeed!)

32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41757)

on June 18, 2012
at 11:48 PM

What component is responsible for this?

16ac9720030cbf0908f56da404ab01b9

(289)

on November 02, 2010
at 01:20 PM

Apparently rapeseed is just kind of stinky naturally. "Canola oil is a little different story. Canola oil as it comes from the rapeseed (canola oil is really rapeseed oil, but since ‘rape’ is a highly charged word producers of rapeseed oil call it canola oil) has a strong, extremely unpleasant odor. During the deodorization process a portion of the canola oil undergoes partial hydrogenation, a fact published in a couple of technical oil processing papers. Since the oil isn’t hydrogenated on purpose, but secondarily as a by product of deodorization, canola oil has gotten a pass."

16ac9720030cbf0908f56da404ab01b9

(289)

on November 02, 2010
at 01:16 PM

Eva, ran out of room above, but here's a link from Eades that might help: http://www.proteinpower.com/drmike/uncategorized/dress-your-salads-with-oil/

16ac9720030cbf0908f56da404ab01b9

(289)

on November 02, 2010
at 01:11 PM

I read the something similar, but it was a homemade recipe. I also read that you can buy small bottles of various seed oils (including canola) that have been pressed under refrigeration with very little pressure and extrusion. The resulting product would be expensive and need to be refrigerated from cradle to grave, similar to flax seed oil. The point in the literature I saw was that a bottle of canola oil can say "cold pressed" and still be rancid, bleached, and deodorized while giving people a false sense of security. I used to buy Spectrum canola, but it was no better than the rest.

Cab7e4ef73c5d7d7a77e1c3d7f5773a1

(7314)

on November 02, 2010
at 11:27 AM

You could probably do worse then, but I still wouldn't eat it. I might save it for a trip to a nice restaurant though.

62ed65f3596aa2f62fa1d58a0c09f8c3

(20807)

on November 02, 2010
at 02:49 AM

If it's been hydrogenated as per use in cookies or some such, or if it has been heated beyond smoke point, then yes. Otherwise, I don't think so. But they only hydrogenate stuff if they want it sold at room temp and they must label it as such. I'd definitely steer clear of anything hydrogenated.

62ed65f3596aa2f62fa1d58a0c09f8c3

(20807)

on November 02, 2010
at 02:45 AM

They didn't use the word 'Rapeseed' simply because Americans don't like the word 'rape.' The funny part is this is the third version I have yet heard about how they derived the word 'Canola' instead, hehe. Also, almost every fruit and vegetable you eat has been 'derived from cross breeding,' so that doesn't mean a lot all by itself. WHat I am interested in is the science and the facts. I don't know a lot about canola production and that is why I am asking.

62ed65f3596aa2f62fa1d58a0c09f8c3

(20807)

on November 02, 2010
at 02:42 AM

Those all screw up my eating and appetite control so they are not the same for me. Ranch dressing does not screw up my appetite control. Therefore, for me at least, it is a lesser evil.

62ed65f3596aa2f62fa1d58a0c09f8c3

(20807)

on November 02, 2010
at 02:40 AM

Is this true though? I saw some recipes on how to make it and the heat produced was less than half of it's smoke point. Plus I could find nothing on bleaching or deodorizing. Now for other oils, like corn oil, I found PLENTY on bleaching and deodorizing.

4a1966b5bc00a9aefd3abd63b9913284

on November 01, 2010
at 02:39 PM

IF I quoted her, I quoted her... Oxidized oils- the plastic reference is talking about their chemical structure -- did I say oxidized oils were more like plastic or hydrogenated? I meant to say hydrogenated... I'll re-read my post :)

84666a86108dee8d11cbbc85b6382083

(2399)

on November 01, 2010
at 01:29 PM

Eva ! We both know that ratio is more or less wortheless. Amounts !

21fd060d0796fdb8a4a990441e08eae7

(24543)

on November 01, 2010
at 01:12 PM

Yeah, I hope Mary Enig didn't say "Canola oil was produced by genetically modifying the parent rapeseed so that the monounsaturated fatty acid would be oleic acid instead of another monounsaturated fatty acid caled erucic acid." GMOing happened much after canola started, and for different reasons than reducing erucic acid. Also, can you explain how oxidized oils are more like a plastic than a food?

62ed65f3596aa2f62fa1d58a0c09f8c3

(20807)

on November 01, 2010
at 03:27 AM

Actually, canola was cross bred the old fashioned way to reduce toxins in the 60s. More recently, GMO versions also came online but you can still buy 'organic' not GMO versions in which solvents and what not are not used and more natural methods are used. Even coconut oil can be made unhealthy if processed wrong.

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8 Answers

2
16ac9720030cbf0908f56da404ab01b9

(289)

on November 01, 2010
at 08:23 AM

I've read in several sources that even "cold pressed" canola is rancid because the pressing process generates its own heat due to the friction of pressing. It then has to be bleached and refined to get rid of the rancid smell. The fact that it's rancid, and the additives used to cover this up, make it hugely inflammatory. This is true of any vegetable oil, not just canola, because seed oils are volatile compared to oils from hotter climates like olive, coconut, macadamia, etc. I avoid all seed oils and don't miss them much.

16ac9720030cbf0908f56da404ab01b9

(289)

on November 02, 2010
at 01:16 PM

Eva, ran out of room above, but here's a link from Eades that might help: http://www.proteinpower.com/drmike/uncategorized/dress-your-salads-with-oil/

16ac9720030cbf0908f56da404ab01b9

(289)

on November 02, 2010
at 01:20 PM

Apparently rapeseed is just kind of stinky naturally. "Canola oil is a little different story. Canola oil as it comes from the rapeseed (canola oil is really rapeseed oil, but since ‘rape’ is a highly charged word producers of rapeseed oil call it canola oil) has a strong, extremely unpleasant odor. During the deodorization process a portion of the canola oil undergoes partial hydrogenation, a fact published in a couple of technical oil processing papers. Since the oil isn’t hydrogenated on purpose, but secondarily as a by product of deodorization, canola oil has gotten a pass."

62ed65f3596aa2f62fa1d58a0c09f8c3

(20807)

on November 02, 2010
at 02:40 AM

Is this true though? I saw some recipes on how to make it and the heat produced was less than half of it's smoke point. Plus I could find nothing on bleaching or deodorizing. Now for other oils, like corn oil, I found PLENTY on bleaching and deodorizing.

16ac9720030cbf0908f56da404ab01b9

(289)

on November 02, 2010
at 01:11 PM

I read the something similar, but it was a homemade recipe. I also read that you can buy small bottles of various seed oils (including canola) that have been pressed under refrigeration with very little pressure and extrusion. The resulting product would be expensive and need to be refrigerated from cradle to grave, similar to flax seed oil. The point in the literature I saw was that a bottle of canola oil can say "cold pressed" and still be rancid, bleached, and deodorized while giving people a false sense of security. I used to buy Spectrum canola, but it was no better than the rest.

0
4e184df9c1ed38f61febc5d6cf031921

(5005)

on June 19, 2012
at 08:00 AM

A local farm to where I live in Sussex makes this

http://www.sussexgold.co.uk/da/87445

It is lovely colour and my local butcher sells it - but I prefer to buy fat and render it down into lard!

I do wonder if it would be a good source of vitamin E, however. I have thought of making mayonnaise using it.

0
531b053b68e92ac509fc1544f88dc103

(1205)

on June 18, 2012
at 09:31 PM

Canola oil is a goitrogen. It disrupts the healthy functioning of the thyroid gland by blocking the absorption of iodine and conversion into thyroid hormone. Avoid canola oil like the plague if you are hypothyroid.

32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41757)

on June 18, 2012
at 11:48 PM

What component is responsible for this?

0
C0fcb48d7da4f76fac17318efd2cd6b8

on November 01, 2010
at 01:56 PM

I am NO expert, but:

"The name "canola" was derived from "Canadian oil, low acid" in 1978" (It's a made up thing, in other words.)

A product known as LEAR (for low erucic acid rapeseed) derived from cross-breeding of multiple lines of Brassica juncea is also referred to as canola oil and is considered safe for consumption."

Words like "derived" and "safe for consumption" make me leery. More and more, if something I pick up in the grocery store has canola oil in it, I put it back.

Seems like there are a lot of good fats out there that are not so dodgy.

322a2783dfe4086591f323c6d2c086d6

on December 10, 2014
at 06:41 PM

["The name "canola" was derived from "Canadian oil, low acid" in 1978" (It's a made up thing, in other words.)]

At SOME point in history, someone "made up" the word "olive" and at some point in history someone made up the word "avocado"... "coconut"... whatever.

If Hallmark makes up "Sweetest Day" THEN I have a problem! "Canola"... no problem!

62ed65f3596aa2f62fa1d58a0c09f8c3

(20807)

on November 02, 2010
at 02:45 AM

They didn't use the word 'Rapeseed' simply because Americans don't like the word 'rape.' The funny part is this is the third version I have yet heard about how they derived the word 'Canola' instead, hehe. Also, almost every fruit and vegetable you eat has been 'derived from cross breeding,' so that doesn't mean a lot all by itself. WHat I am interested in is the science and the facts. I don't know a lot about canola production and that is why I am asking.

0
21fd060d0796fdb8a4a990441e08eae7

(24543)

on November 01, 2010
at 01:11 PM

Yeah, I hope Mary Enig didn't say "Canola oil was produced by genetically modifying the parent rapeseed so that the monounsaturated fatty acid would be oleic acid instead of another monounsaturated fatty acid caled erucic acid." GMOing happened much after canola started, and for different reasons than reducing erucic acid. Also, can you explain how oxidized oils are more like a plastic than a food?

0
4a1966b5bc00a9aefd3abd63b9913284

on November 01, 2010
at 03:08 AM

21fd060d0796fdb8a4a990441e08eae7

(24543)

on November 01, 2010
at 01:12 PM

Yeah, I hope Mary Enig didn't say "Canola oil was produced by genetically modifying the parent rapeseed so that the monounsaturated fatty acid would be oleic acid instead of another monounsaturated fatty acid caled erucic acid." GMOing happened much after canola started, and for different reasons than reducing erucic acid. Also, can you explain how oxidized oils are more like a plastic than a food?

4a1966b5bc00a9aefd3abd63b9913284

on November 01, 2010
at 02:39 PM

IF I quoted her, I quoted her... Oxidized oils- the plastic reference is talking about their chemical structure -- did I say oxidized oils were more like plastic or hydrogenated? I meant to say hydrogenated... I'll re-read my post :)

62ed65f3596aa2f62fa1d58a0c09f8c3

(20807)

on November 01, 2010
at 03:27 AM

Actually, canola was cross bred the old fashioned way to reduce toxins in the 60s. More recently, GMO versions also came online but you can still buy 'organic' not GMO versions in which solvents and what not are not used and more natural methods are used. Even coconut oil can be made unhealthy if processed wrong.

-1
Cab7e4ef73c5d7d7a77e1c3d7f5773a1

(7314)

on November 01, 2010
at 01:52 PM

32 percent pufa? Thats high. I believe it also has trans fats. Not sure where I read that though. Make the salad dressing with a better oil, or don't at all.

Bread, pizza, and cake all taste good too...

62ed65f3596aa2f62fa1d58a0c09f8c3

(20807)

on November 02, 2010
at 02:49 AM

If it's been hydrogenated as per use in cookies or some such, or if it has been heated beyond smoke point, then yes. Otherwise, I don't think so. But they only hydrogenate stuff if they want it sold at room temp and they must label it as such. I'd definitely steer clear of anything hydrogenated.

Cab7e4ef73c5d7d7a77e1c3d7f5773a1

(7314)

on November 02, 2010
at 11:27 AM

You could probably do worse then, but I still wouldn't eat it. I might save it for a trip to a nice restaurant though.

62ed65f3596aa2f62fa1d58a0c09f8c3

(20807)

on November 02, 2010
at 02:42 AM

Those all screw up my eating and appetite control so they are not the same for me. Ranch dressing does not screw up my appetite control. Therefore, for me at least, it is a lesser evil.

-2
B0d962eb59cc53de431b6fe48c6b24ad

on June 18, 2012
at 09:14 PM

We produce Expeller-Pressed canola oil. We gravity separate the the oil after pressing. The finished oil is very yellow. If you put it on a white plate (for dipping), it will look fluorescent yellow. The oil in a clear bottle will be dark like honey. Just like all other oils that have high oleic acid components (olive oil, fish oil, etc.), canola oil has an odor and a taste as well as a color. Canola oil is a heavy oil. It pours just like 30 weight motor oil.

Processing changes the chemical make up of canola oil. When you chemically alter the canola oil it is no longer canola oil. If you are buying canola oil and it is light or clear in color; if it has no odor or taste; then, it is not canola oil.

Alan Verbitsky The Canola Oil Company [email protected]

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