8

votes

Homemade Ghee - Did you use the milk solids? (Pics Incl)

Answered on April 17, 2016
Created February 23, 2011 at 5:14 PM

Been making homemade ghee a lot lately. So excited about this

For those of you not familiar with ghee, it is essentially clarified butter (butter with the milk solids lactose & casein removed). The end result is a golden yellowy/orangish butter oil that is extremely high heat stable (excellent for cooking and even frying). I was going to purchase a batch from Pure Indian Foods, but instead decided to just venture out and make my own. It was SUPER easy and a total success on the first try.

  • melted 2 lbs of pasture butter in a sauce pen on med-low heat

  • skimmed off and removed the gathering milk solids from the top of the melted butter with a spoon (as it was simmering)

  • allow it to simmer and crackle on low for about 10 minutes and remove heat

  • let it cool a bit. **see note

  • strained with cheesecloth over a strainer into a bowl.

  • transferred from bowl into jar with a seal tight lid

Bam! perfect crystal clear grass fed ghee. Soooo delicious and it's a huge savings to spend the 20 minutes to make it yourself.

**the solids at the bottom of the pan should be 'slightly' cooked (not burnt, but light brownish). this timing is essential for the best ghee flavor. if they are still white, your 'ghee' will be more like clarified butter, very yellow. if they are black, you burned them and it may make the ghee also taste burnt.

So here's my questions to all... Anyone else ever made ghee? and if so, did you use/eat the milk solids for anything or did you just toss em out? I took a bite and man it was extremely salty!

Picture Storyboard:

Cold Humboldt Pasture Butter - (btw... so far, Organic Valley butter made the best tasting ghee) alt text

Milk solids starting to separate -------------------------------------------Still bubbling and popping alt text

Foamy milk solids removed -------------------------------------------No more bubbling - it's DONE! alt text

Cheesecloth, Strainer, Glass Jar/Bowl -------------------Pour to strain. Check out the solids in the pan. alt text

Grass Fed Ghee Liquid (melted) -------------------------------Grass Fed Ghee Solid (room temp) alt text

----------------------------------------------- Crystal Clear Grass Fed Ghee!!! -------------------------------------------- alt text

D74288318247c62923457d39a068e3a7

(116)

on May 27, 2013
at 06:09 PM

There's no need to "boil" the butter. Clarifying can be done @ low temp. But I like the whole herb idea, considering some of them are fat soluble. Thanks for the hack, now making superbutter is my number one priority.

A3bca1c6a1a3fcbad56fae8bb6fb6c1f

(95)

on November 15, 2011
at 12:03 PM

TY. Working from home today so I will give it a go!

Af1d286f0fd5c3949f59b4edf4d892f5

(18452)

on November 15, 2011
at 04:55 AM

HLH. It's so easy it's ridiculous. You just throw the butter in the pan, turn it on it's lowest possible setting and let it sit for like 35-40 minutes. skim the top foam and make sure the bottom solids are brownish. let it cool for a few minutes and strain into jar. i ran out of cheesecloth so I used a paper towel. It worked fine. I'm laying off ghee for now because of some personal issues, but I still think it's a good fat for most people.

A3bca1c6a1a3fcbad56fae8bb6fb6c1f

(95)

on November 15, 2011
at 01:20 AM

Wow, I shoulda looked here before I bought a jar of ghee...I haven't opened it yet, wonder if I can return it...? I'm going to try this. It's just me so I can make a small batch....

32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41757)

on September 25, 2011
at 12:12 AM

Cool set of pics.

32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41757)

on September 25, 2011
at 12:10 AM

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/2887943 "Substantial amounts of cholesterol oxides were found in ghee (12.3% of sterols), but not in fresh butter…" Ok, now the question is how much of the essential oils are necessary to reduce this. I'm afraid it's probably quite a bit, and who wants to eat the oxidized essential oils?

A89f9751a97c3082802dc0bcbe4e9208

(13978)

on March 26, 2011
at 06:57 AM

Thanks for this Jack! I'm excited to try my hand at making ghee!

5e36f73c3f95eb4ea13a009f4936449f

(8280)

on March 26, 2011
at 04:36 AM

The salt is supposed to go out with the milk solids.

50637dfd7dc7a7e811d82283f4f5fd10

(5838)

on March 09, 2011
at 04:48 PM

In what amounts of the above recommended herbs and spices would be sufficient enough to prevent oxidation?

4781cf8ae1bfcb558dfb056af17bea94

(4359)

on February 24, 2011
at 02:10 PM

I think most people, including CM, think cholesterol oxides are bad. He probably think the good that comes from eating ghee and eggs outweighs that bad, and so do I. But, that doens't mean you can't get the good while avoiding the bad, does it? Ghee would taste rather delicious I think if cooked the way I suggested and the cholesterol oxides would be dramatically reduced.

84666a86108dee8d11cbbc85b6382083

(2399)

on February 24, 2011
at 11:42 AM

Yeah. It's not like you'll be eating 100g every time. Give it a go why not.

Af1d286f0fd5c3949f59b4edf4d892f5

(18452)

on February 23, 2011
at 10:14 PM

hmmm. the jury's still out on this one for me. are you saying that eating ghee has been bad all these years due to cholesterol oxidation? i understand the concept and the possibility of it, but I definitely am not ready to just accept that eating a cooked egg yolk or heated butter is damaging to one's health. i'd really like to hear chris masterjohn's take on this.

Af1d286f0fd5c3949f59b4edf4d892f5

(18452)

on February 23, 2011
at 09:25 PM

yah i guess if you are not allergic to lactose/casein then it should be ok to eat, right? no diffferent than adding a big spoonful of butter into a dish, which I do all the time. the solids that I skimmed off the top and discarded into a bowl smelled like delicious cheese. that's why I ask.

Af1d286f0fd5c3949f59b4edf4d892f5

(18452)

on February 23, 2011
at 08:02 PM

personally, salted vs unsalted has not made a bit of difference. infact, i just made ghee with salted butter a couple days ago, and i think it was my best batch yet. it has no salty flavor, just smooth and buttery.

  • Af1d286f0fd5c3949f59b4edf4d892f5

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11 Answers

2
A089b683ee0498f2b21b7edfa300e405

on February 23, 2011
at 05:42 PM

1) Use unsalted pastured butter to make regular ghee, salted butter will leave a salty taste.

2) The light brown fried milk solids - They are a wonderful treat if you eat dairy. Mixed with a spoon of honey, they make a great dessert, full of nutrients and very calorie dense.

Af1d286f0fd5c3949f59b4edf4d892f5

(18452)

on February 23, 2011
at 08:02 PM

personally, salted vs unsalted has not made a bit of difference. infact, i just made ghee with salted butter a couple days ago, and i think it was my best batch yet. it has no salty flavor, just smooth and buttery.

5e36f73c3f95eb4ea13a009f4936449f

(8280)

on March 26, 2011
at 04:36 AM

The salt is supposed to go out with the milk solids.

1
Cbda678b2a6bf0537d8c4ea0ce8aa9ad

(4319)

on April 17, 2016
at 07:42 AM

I used to feed them to my chickens when I had some. 

1
0a22e2238d5f5d4c06ed45ba1f03fa51

on May 27, 2013
at 05:42 PM

I know this is an old thread; but for anyone who happens upon these instructions I would like to add that I never skim the top foam off of the butter while making ghee; it will settle eventually on its own.

1
C8586fa2188272d5474d22aa8a500619

on August 19, 2012
at 07:20 PM

I added the milk solids to mashed potatos first time today and the result was excellent.

1
786a6622f5d217b829809da5be12aa58

on September 24, 2011
at 11:46 PM

One of the best toppings for steamed vegetables is browned butter. Slightly burned is even good. I'll bet the solids would be great sprinkled on top of steamed broccoli, green beans or even peas

1
4781cf8ae1bfcb558dfb056af17bea94

(4359)

on February 23, 2011
at 09:54 PM

I'd add some rosemary, oregano, and/or turmeric before you boil the butter to prevent the formation of oxidize cholesterol.

Af1d286f0fd5c3949f59b4edf4d892f5

(18452)

on February 23, 2011
at 10:14 PM

hmmm. the jury's still out on this one for me. are you saying that eating ghee has been bad all these years due to cholesterol oxidation? i understand the concept and the possibility of it, but I definitely am not ready to just accept that eating a cooked egg yolk or heated butter is damaging to one's health. i'd really like to hear chris masterjohn's take on this.

4781cf8ae1bfcb558dfb056af17bea94

(4359)

on February 24, 2011
at 02:10 PM

I think most people, including CM, think cholesterol oxides are bad. He probably think the good that comes from eating ghee and eggs outweighs that bad, and so do I. But, that doens't mean you can't get the good while avoiding the bad, does it? Ghee would taste rather delicious I think if cooked the way I suggested and the cholesterol oxides would be dramatically reduced.

50637dfd7dc7a7e811d82283f4f5fd10

(5838)

on March 09, 2011
at 04:48 PM

In what amounts of the above recommended herbs and spices would be sufficient enough to prevent oxidation?

32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41757)

on September 25, 2011
at 12:10 AM

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/2887943 "Substantial amounts of cholesterol oxides were found in ghee (12.3% of sterols), but not in fresh butter…" Ok, now the question is how much of the essential oils are necessary to reduce this. I'm afraid it's probably quite a bit, and who wants to eat the oxidized essential oils?

D74288318247c62923457d39a068e3a7

(116)

on May 27, 2013
at 06:09 PM

There's no need to "boil" the butter. Clarifying can be done @ low temp. But I like the whole herb idea, considering some of them are fat soluble. Thanks for the hack, now making superbutter is my number one priority.

0
5762c892b3726b772a56727f81a63747

on April 17, 2016
at 03:57 AM

I think the milk solids taste good on their own, but are they healthy? I thought one of the main reasons people make ghee is to avoid the lactose problems people have with the milk solids. Are there any studies done on this? Also, do they need to be refrigerated and what effect does salt have on the process?

0
5ac484fee33edbdf7620e82021657022

on August 22, 2012
at 04:58 PM

I use the solids for my pilafs instead of oil or butter. You don't need to add salt obviously and the slightly brown solids give the pilaf beautiful color and super taste.

0
40449b985898b088a64660b40f329f0f

(951)

on September 25, 2011
at 01:43 AM

Awesome. Thanks so much.

0
84666a86108dee8d11cbbc85b6382083

(2399)

on February 23, 2011
at 09:22 PM

I was actually wondering the same thing since I just made ghee last weekend. I presume the milk solids are just casein/lactose so I'll throw them out although mixing some heavy cream, cinnamon and x never makes a bad dish :D

Af1d286f0fd5c3949f59b4edf4d892f5

(18452)

on February 23, 2011
at 09:25 PM

yah i guess if you are not allergic to lactose/casein then it should be ok to eat, right? no diffferent than adding a big spoonful of butter into a dish, which I do all the time. the solids that I skimmed off the top and discarded into a bowl smelled like delicious cheese. that's why I ask.

84666a86108dee8d11cbbc85b6382083

(2399)

on February 24, 2011
at 11:42 AM

Yeah. It's not like you'll be eating 100g every time. Give it a go why not.

0
1acc4ee9381d9a8d998b59915b3f997e

(2099)

on February 23, 2011
at 05:27 PM

I made ghee when I saw the price of the pre-made stuff, and yes, it was super-easy, but no, I didn't eat the milk solids. Btw, although I used a burner set on the very lowest setting, I know people who have made ghee in a crockpot with great success.

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