3

votes

Does red palm oil contain salicylates?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created December 14, 2011 at 11:34 AM

Hi,

since olive oil, coconut oil, almonds etc. give me diarrhea, I thought about having a salicylate sensitivity. Red palm oil seems to be a decent substitude for coconut oil (due to MCTs) but I'm really unsure about how much salicylate it contains. Can anybody shed light on this miracle?

Or maybe equally interesting: Is there another connection between coconut, olives and almonds, which could be causing those problems?

Thanks!

EDIT:

Actually I tolerate fat well, 100 grams of lard inside my meal doesn't bother me. But already the smallest piece of coconut (creamed coconut, coconut oil, even refined coconut oil) leads to diarrhea. It's the same reaction with virgin olive oil and nuts, though I havent examined which sort of nuts in particular. Is there a general rule of thumb, that nuts contain high amounts of salicylate? Or maybe the palm kernel..?

8508fec4bae4a580d1e1b807058fee8e

(6244)

on April 15, 2012
at 03:36 PM

Thorny you might be having a mold reaction to nuts and coconut oil. I'm not sure about olive oil, but most of it is adulterated with inferior oils although California olive oil seems pretty reputable. See the UC Davis study on olive oil http://olivecenter.ucdavis.edu/news-events/news/files/olive%20oil%20final%20071410%20.pdf

7636e1e02ef91a46f20a42e07b565a4b

(367)

on December 30, 2011
at 05:30 PM

Thank you, you too! They're definitely just my experiences and musings; I hope my theories are wrong, really. :) Best of luck to you too. :)

E2b72f1912f777917d8ee6b7fba43c26

(2384)

on December 29, 2011
at 03:23 PM

Thanks very much for your priceless experiences, you are great! Best luck on your way! :-)

7636e1e02ef91a46f20a42e07b565a4b

(367)

on December 19, 2011
at 09:35 PM

nice to help those of us affected by this. I certainly wish you well on the journey!

7636e1e02ef91a46f20a42e07b565a4b

(367)

on December 19, 2011
at 09:34 PM

I also wonder if stress is a huge factor, as this impairs the blood-brain barrier as well and I've always been a high-stress person. Another factor I'm looking at is nutrient deficiencies caused by high-ingestion of phenolics over time. For instance, tannins, a polyphenolic compound in coffee, chocolate, tea, etc. - binds with a number of minerals such as iron and zinc as well as amino acids, etc. I believe salicylates interfere with vitamin K absorption but I'll have to double check on that. Eventually I hope to synthesize this information in some form, on a blog or something - as it would be

7636e1e02ef91a46f20a42e07b565a4b

(367)

on December 19, 2011
at 09:26 PM

So... admittedly I'm rather cynical at this point and I'm skeptical of what "leaky gut" means - I thought I'd healed it with the magical healing powers of coconut oil, probiotics, not eating sugar, etc. While I felt better than being toxic with yeast I believe I still felt unwell because I had other toxins in its place, and having a clean, well-oiled machine of a gut didn't matter. I'm researching the blood-brain barrier a bit now as an alternative explanation to the leaky gut (though I do believe gut dysbiosis is a problem, my working hypothesis is that it's not all it's cracked up to be).

7636e1e02ef91a46f20a42e07b565a4b

(367)

on December 19, 2011
at 09:22 PM

Consequently I think I just traded one set of poisons for another. My feeling is that "paleo" diets are often highly unnatural when you follow the Mark Sisson-style, pro-antioxidant, big-ass-salad type approach in order to sub out high reward, starchy foods. I think many people end up with a very high-phenolic diet that doesn't resemble simple, monotonous, low-chemical diets of hunter gatherers and traditional cultures. At least that was my experience. As always, the dose makes the poison - but no one points out that phenolics are caustic poisons that can even kill you in high doses.

7636e1e02ef91a46f20a42e07b565a4b

(367)

on December 19, 2011
at 09:18 PM

the coup de grace. My symptoms also got particularly out of hand when I attempted to battle a cold with ingestion of large doses of cayenne pepper, another salicylate-loaded substance. (If I knew then what I know now....) This was either coincidental or the last straw - I don't know. So to go back to your question about paleo diets and leaky gut - I had actually jumped on the "paleo," low-carb bandwagon in order to battle candida albicans or yeast overgrowth, and it was in substituting carbs with fat and spices for sugar that coconut oil, cayenne, etc. all made a large appearance in my diet.

7636e1e02ef91a46f20a42e07b565a4b

(367)

on December 19, 2011
at 09:14 PM

in particular I poured gasoline on the fire without even realizing it by using coconut oil as my antidote to yeast, because it does kill yeast, and while I had a terrible reaction to it at first, I found that I could gradually build a tolerance and it seemed to keep yeast overgrowth in check and initially quelled eczema symptoms. Meanwhile I was putting coconut oil in a cup of coffee in the morning and had no idea I was ingesting a mass dose of phenols in various forms that eventually my body would reject completely. I think yeast overgrowth was the initial force while coconut oil/coffee was

7636e1e02ef91a46f20a42e07b565a4b

(367)

on December 19, 2011
at 09:05 PM

breaking out in a rash. I think the main triggering event for me was many rounds of broad-spectrum antibiotics that wiped out my gut flora and caused fungal overgrowth, which led to yeast intolerance and probably the beginnings of phenol intolerance. I've read that phenols are a metabolic byproduct of yeast (though I'm still not clear how/what, specifically - histamine? and likewise ethanol, chemically similar to phenol, is produced by yeast fermentation). One way or another, yeast, phenols, histamine, ethanol - I became overloaded and intolerance kicked in which worsened over time. In particu

7636e1e02ef91a46f20a42e07b565a4b

(367)

on December 19, 2011
at 08:39 PM

Hi Thomy, no worries - there is a dearth of information about this subject so I always feel like I'm grasping at straws, unfortunately. And hey, if you ever find out a useful bit of info, just let me know! The more of us that know about this the more knowledge we may stumble upon eventually. So to answer your questions as best I can, yes I imagine an external source could be a trigger as the skin absorbs whatever you put on it. Years ago, before I was clued into the possibility of food intolerance, I realized that I couldn't put almost any type of skin cream/fragrance/etc. on my skin without

E2b72f1912f777917d8ee6b7fba43c26

(2384)

on December 16, 2011
at 08:21 AM

Have you had similar reactions? Could actually the external application of a lotion etc. bee causing a sal sensitivity? And on the other hand, did eating paleo alleviate your symptoms? Could it be possible to heal the sal sens. once the GI tract is fully repaired? Some many questions, unfortunately I do not have so much wisdom to offer you in return.

E2b72f1912f777917d8ee6b7fba43c26

(2384)

on December 16, 2011
at 08:18 AM

Thanks again for this whole lot of dense information. Experience reports are quite rare regarding this topic. When I remember correctly, I had a bad reaction to sauerkraut, which - as you describe it - is another source of histamine/phenols. There is still one thing I'd like to find out: Could there be a external trigger for developing salicylate sensitivity? I remember very well that I had a face lotion that I used daily for years - It contained a high amount of salicylates. One day out of nowhere my face startet to get red and itchy and no other product containing sal worked from thisdayon.

7636e1e02ef91a46f20a42e07b565a4b

(367)

on December 15, 2011
at 09:19 PM

Also, meat-wise - aged meat is a problem. Leftover meat is a problem. Seafood degrades rapidly into histamine so when it's not fresh, it's a big problem. Frankly anything aged/leftover/fermented/cured etc. is problematic, but in general very fresh meat seems like one of few relatively phenol-free foods. Failsafe recommends meat procured within 2 weeks of slaughter. Not a possibility for me yet, at least.

7636e1e02ef91a46f20a42e07b565a4b

(367)

on December 15, 2011
at 09:17 PM

Anyway, to summarize, I disagree with most salicylate lists in that - for me anyway, but probably for most SS people - I think the root problem is phenols/polyphenols, and that salicylates are simply one type among many.

7636e1e02ef91a46f20a42e07b565a4b

(367)

on December 15, 2011
at 09:12 PM

pears (also phenols). This site lets you look at the phenol contents of foods: http://www.phenol-explorer.eu/ but many are absent, and without enough prior scientific knowledge it's a bit hard to tell what amounts are negligible or not in my experience. It's a starting point, though. I also bought a cheap used copy of this book: http://www.amazon.com/Chemical-Intolerance-Physiological-Treatment-Modalities/dp/0849389267/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1323983314&sr=8-1 and found it somewhat helpful - he came up with "phenolic desensitization" which he found useful, but I'm not sure how to implement.

7636e1e02ef91a46f20a42e07b565a4b

(367)

on December 15, 2011
at 09:11 PM

triggers our inflammatory reactions. Histamine is found in high quantities in a lot of foods, like cheese, alcohol and vinegar. This elimination diet _may_ be a good starting place: http://failsafediet.wordpress.com/the-rpah-elimination-diet-failsafe/. However, it does include dairy, cocoa and decaf coffee, and other vegetables with phenols - I'm not sure than any plants truly contain low levels of all phenol types. I did this elimination diet but excluded dairy, cocoa and coffee and found that the bulk of my symptoms went away, but certainly not all. Cashews were somewhat problematic as were

7636e1e02ef91a46f20a42e07b565a4b

(367)

on December 15, 2011
at 09:11 PM

reaction to coffees and teas. I've scanned the salicylate sensitivity forum from time to time and it seems most people also can't do coffee, tea, chocolate or dairy, and I believe these are all low-salicylate, high-phenol-containing foods, so if you go by the 'failsafe' or Feingold programs, you could still end up quite reactive. Another phenol type appears to be amines, which are produced when meat ages or cooks long periods. Amines also include histamine, to which I am highly reactive and probably most food intolerant people are, as histamine of course is also the neurotransmitter that

7636e1e02ef91a46f20a42e07b565a4b

(367)

on December 15, 2011
at 09:11 PM

not divining its true origin somehow, but yes it does look and taste quite different from the uber-red _palm oil_. Anyway, Thomy - no problem! The palm oil thing is truly a bummer. Yes, I'm not sure what else the culprit would be for you if not salicylate - another component is flavonoids, but I believe they are also a type of polyphenol. Salicylates are a subgroup of phenols. That's where I diverge from the lists of salicylate foods online - they distinguish them from other high-phenol foods, such as chocolate and decaf coffee, and I have a moderate reaction to chocolate and a severe react

7636e1e02ef91a46f20a42e07b565a4b

(367)

on December 15, 2011
at 09:10 PM

Fed, my container of Spectrum shortening says it is from "organic palm oil," not "palm kernel oil." However I used to have a jar of red palm oil, tried it, and reacted badly to it and threw it out, so to answer the question more fully I have reacted in my usual way to both types- I simply had the shortening in mind because I had hoped that the white, refined-looking stuff would be safer than the red unprocessed type and imagine someone else might jump to that conclusion. Sorry to not clarify. If the shortening is misrepresenting itself by not saying it is "palm kernel oil" then I apologize for

Medium avatar

(19469)

on December 15, 2011
at 07:16 PM

Palm oil shortening is made from the palm kernel (the nut). Red palm oil is made from the fruit (think avocado flesh vs. avocado seed). I believe that the original question was in reference to red palm oil, so a reaction to palm shortening may not indicate a reaction to red palm oil.

E2b72f1912f777917d8ee6b7fba43c26

(2384)

on December 15, 2011
at 10:31 AM

As to your sensitivity: Does your experience agree with the lists about salicylates on the web? Is there any food I can try, which definitely tells me, whether I am salicylate sensitive or not? Do you tolerate meat well?

E2b72f1912f777917d8ee6b7fba43c26

(2384)

on December 15, 2011
at 10:29 AM

Thanks for your great response! Exactly the kind of experience I was looking for. Although it seems that palm oil is also contaminated :( Actually I'm not completely sure whether or not I'm salicylate sensitive, but even the fact that coconut oil AND olive oil give that reaction doesn't really leave any other conclusions!? The problem with coconut products is that all around the web you can read its a "die-off" reaction when you get diarrhea, or headache etc. from it. So you keep eating it, letting it damage you, although common sense tells you to throw it instantly away...

E2b72f1912f777917d8ee6b7fba43c26

(2384)

on December 14, 2011
at 07:31 PM

are you salicylate sensitive?

E2b72f1912f777917d8ee6b7fba43c26

(2384)

on December 14, 2011
at 07:30 PM

Thanks, but the question is, whether they didn't list palm oil, because it has no salicylates, or because they had just no information

Bbceb114ed2332c22490e324d991497e

(705)

on December 14, 2011
at 07:05 PM

Red palm oil doesn't have mcts. Palm kernel oil has the mcts.

B0fe7b5a9a197cd293978150cbd9055f

(8938)

on December 14, 2011
at 12:06 PM

Are you sure you get diarrhea because of a sensitivity? Increasing fat in a diet can cause loose stools. Especially if you don't eat a lot of vegetables (I had diarrhea for 1 full month on ZC).

  • E2b72f1912f777917d8ee6b7fba43c26

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3 Answers

best answer

2
7636e1e02ef91a46f20a42e07b565a4b

on December 15, 2011
at 08:20 AM

I am salicylate sensitive and have had the usual negative reaction to palm oil shortening, sadly. Just anecdotal evidence as I haven't been able to find any info about palm oil in particular either. Nuts all seem pretty high in salicylates/phenols. The only "failsafe" one is the cashew, but I believe they're still high in other phenols. Then there's also the fact that all nuts supposedly contain amounts of mold, which is another sensitivity I have - so I've found that one way or the other, cashews aren't reaction-free for me either. I usually break down and eat some type of nut here and there, though. Being salicylate sensitive is seriously tough business in terms of how limiting it is. I'd be curious to hear more about your experience with it. But yes, also, olive oil, coconut oil and almonds - these are all very high in salicylates, so that strikes me as your likely connection. I react more to those items than most things, personally. I wonder if the fat content is some sort of factor as well. (And I too am fine with purer animal fats, such as tallow.)

7636e1e02ef91a46f20a42e07b565a4b

(367)

on December 15, 2011
at 09:19 PM

Also, meat-wise - aged meat is a problem. Leftover meat is a problem. Seafood degrades rapidly into histamine so when it's not fresh, it's a big problem. Frankly anything aged/leftover/fermented/cured etc. is problematic, but in general very fresh meat seems like one of few relatively phenol-free foods. Failsafe recommends meat procured within 2 weeks of slaughter. Not a possibility for me yet, at least.

E2b72f1912f777917d8ee6b7fba43c26

(2384)

on December 15, 2011
at 10:29 AM

Thanks for your great response! Exactly the kind of experience I was looking for. Although it seems that palm oil is also contaminated :( Actually I'm not completely sure whether or not I'm salicylate sensitive, but even the fact that coconut oil AND olive oil give that reaction doesn't really leave any other conclusions!? The problem with coconut products is that all around the web you can read its a "die-off" reaction when you get diarrhea, or headache etc. from it. So you keep eating it, letting it damage you, although common sense tells you to throw it instantly away...

7636e1e02ef91a46f20a42e07b565a4b

(367)

on December 15, 2011
at 09:12 PM

pears (also phenols). This site lets you look at the phenol contents of foods: http://www.phenol-explorer.eu/ but many are absent, and without enough prior scientific knowledge it's a bit hard to tell what amounts are negligible or not in my experience. It's a starting point, though. I also bought a cheap used copy of this book: http://www.amazon.com/Chemical-Intolerance-Physiological-Treatment-Modalities/dp/0849389267/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1323983314&sr=8-1 and found it somewhat helpful - he came up with "phenolic desensitization" which he found useful, but I'm not sure how to implement.

7636e1e02ef91a46f20a42e07b565a4b

(367)

on December 15, 2011
at 09:11 PM

triggers our inflammatory reactions. Histamine is found in high quantities in a lot of foods, like cheese, alcohol and vinegar. This elimination diet _may_ be a good starting place: http://failsafediet.wordpress.com/the-rpah-elimination-diet-failsafe/. However, it does include dairy, cocoa and decaf coffee, and other vegetables with phenols - I'm not sure than any plants truly contain low levels of all phenol types. I did this elimination diet but excluded dairy, cocoa and coffee and found that the bulk of my symptoms went away, but certainly not all. Cashews were somewhat problematic as were

7636e1e02ef91a46f20a42e07b565a4b

(367)

on December 15, 2011
at 09:11 PM

not divining its true origin somehow, but yes it does look and taste quite different from the uber-red _palm oil_. Anyway, Thomy - no problem! The palm oil thing is truly a bummer. Yes, I'm not sure what else the culprit would be for you if not salicylate - another component is flavonoids, but I believe they are also a type of polyphenol. Salicylates are a subgroup of phenols. That's where I diverge from the lists of salicylate foods online - they distinguish them from other high-phenol foods, such as chocolate and decaf coffee, and I have a moderate reaction to chocolate and a severe react

Medium avatar

(19469)

on December 15, 2011
at 07:16 PM

Palm oil shortening is made from the palm kernel (the nut). Red palm oil is made from the fruit (think avocado flesh vs. avocado seed). I believe that the original question was in reference to red palm oil, so a reaction to palm shortening may not indicate a reaction to red palm oil.

7636e1e02ef91a46f20a42e07b565a4b

(367)

on December 15, 2011
at 09:11 PM

reaction to coffees and teas. I've scanned the salicylate sensitivity forum from time to time and it seems most people also can't do coffee, tea, chocolate or dairy, and I believe these are all low-salicylate, high-phenol-containing foods, so if you go by the 'failsafe' or Feingold programs, you could still end up quite reactive. Another phenol type appears to be amines, which are produced when meat ages or cooks long periods. Amines also include histamine, to which I am highly reactive and probably most food intolerant people are, as histamine of course is also the neurotransmitter that

E2b72f1912f777917d8ee6b7fba43c26

(2384)

on December 15, 2011
at 10:31 AM

As to your sensitivity: Does your experience agree with the lists about salicylates on the web? Is there any food I can try, which definitely tells me, whether I am salicylate sensitive or not? Do you tolerate meat well?

7636e1e02ef91a46f20a42e07b565a4b

(367)

on December 15, 2011
at 09:17 PM

Anyway, to summarize, I disagree with most salicylate lists in that - for me anyway, but probably for most SS people - I think the root problem is phenols/polyphenols, and that salicylates are simply one type among many.

7636e1e02ef91a46f20a42e07b565a4b

(367)

on December 15, 2011
at 09:10 PM

Fed, my container of Spectrum shortening says it is from "organic palm oil," not "palm kernel oil." However I used to have a jar of red palm oil, tried it, and reacted badly to it and threw it out, so to answer the question more fully I have reacted in my usual way to both types- I simply had the shortening in mind because I had hoped that the white, refined-looking stuff would be safer than the red unprocessed type and imagine someone else might jump to that conclusion. Sorry to not clarify. If the shortening is misrepresenting itself by not saying it is "palm kernel oil" then I apologize for

E2b72f1912f777917d8ee6b7fba43c26

(2384)

on December 16, 2011
at 08:18 AM

Thanks again for this whole lot of dense information. Experience reports are quite rare regarding this topic. When I remember correctly, I had a bad reaction to sauerkraut, which - as you describe it - is another source of histamine/phenols. There is still one thing I'd like to find out: Could there be a external trigger for developing salicylate sensitivity? I remember very well that I had a face lotion that I used daily for years - It contained a high amount of salicylates. One day out of nowhere my face startet to get red and itchy and no other product containing sal worked from thisdayon.

E2b72f1912f777917d8ee6b7fba43c26

(2384)

on December 16, 2011
at 08:21 AM

Have you had similar reactions? Could actually the external application of a lotion etc. bee causing a sal sensitivity? And on the other hand, did eating paleo alleviate your symptoms? Could it be possible to heal the sal sens. once the GI tract is fully repaired? Some many questions, unfortunately I do not have so much wisdom to offer you in return.

7636e1e02ef91a46f20a42e07b565a4b

(367)

on December 19, 2011
at 09:14 PM

in particular I poured gasoline on the fire without even realizing it by using coconut oil as my antidote to yeast, because it does kill yeast, and while I had a terrible reaction to it at first, I found that I could gradually build a tolerance and it seemed to keep yeast overgrowth in check and initially quelled eczema symptoms. Meanwhile I was putting coconut oil in a cup of coffee in the morning and had no idea I was ingesting a mass dose of phenols in various forms that eventually my body would reject completely. I think yeast overgrowth was the initial force while coconut oil/coffee was

7636e1e02ef91a46f20a42e07b565a4b

(367)

on December 19, 2011
at 08:39 PM

Hi Thomy, no worries - there is a dearth of information about this subject so I always feel like I'm grasping at straws, unfortunately. And hey, if you ever find out a useful bit of info, just let me know! The more of us that know about this the more knowledge we may stumble upon eventually. So to answer your questions as best I can, yes I imagine an external source could be a trigger as the skin absorbs whatever you put on it. Years ago, before I was clued into the possibility of food intolerance, I realized that I couldn't put almost any type of skin cream/fragrance/etc. on my skin without

7636e1e02ef91a46f20a42e07b565a4b

(367)

on December 19, 2011
at 09:22 PM

Consequently I think I just traded one set of poisons for another. My feeling is that "paleo" diets are often highly unnatural when you follow the Mark Sisson-style, pro-antioxidant, big-ass-salad type approach in order to sub out high reward, starchy foods. I think many people end up with a very high-phenolic diet that doesn't resemble simple, monotonous, low-chemical diets of hunter gatherers and traditional cultures. At least that was my experience. As always, the dose makes the poison - but no one points out that phenolics are caustic poisons that can even kill you in high doses.

7636e1e02ef91a46f20a42e07b565a4b

(367)

on December 19, 2011
at 09:05 PM

breaking out in a rash. I think the main triggering event for me was many rounds of broad-spectrum antibiotics that wiped out my gut flora and caused fungal overgrowth, which led to yeast intolerance and probably the beginnings of phenol intolerance. I've read that phenols are a metabolic byproduct of yeast (though I'm still not clear how/what, specifically - histamine? and likewise ethanol, chemically similar to phenol, is produced by yeast fermentation). One way or another, yeast, phenols, histamine, ethanol - I became overloaded and intolerance kicked in which worsened over time. In particu

7636e1e02ef91a46f20a42e07b565a4b

(367)

on December 19, 2011
at 09:35 PM

nice to help those of us affected by this. I certainly wish you well on the journey!

7636e1e02ef91a46f20a42e07b565a4b

(367)

on December 19, 2011
at 09:18 PM

the coup de grace. My symptoms also got particularly out of hand when I attempted to battle a cold with ingestion of large doses of cayenne pepper, another salicylate-loaded substance. (If I knew then what I know now....) This was either coincidental or the last straw - I don't know. So to go back to your question about paleo diets and leaky gut - I had actually jumped on the "paleo," low-carb bandwagon in order to battle candida albicans or yeast overgrowth, and it was in substituting carbs with fat and spices for sugar that coconut oil, cayenne, etc. all made a large appearance in my diet.

7636e1e02ef91a46f20a42e07b565a4b

(367)

on December 19, 2011
at 09:26 PM

So... admittedly I'm rather cynical at this point and I'm skeptical of what "leaky gut" means - I thought I'd healed it with the magical healing powers of coconut oil, probiotics, not eating sugar, etc. While I felt better than being toxic with yeast I believe I still felt unwell because I had other toxins in its place, and having a clean, well-oiled machine of a gut didn't matter. I'm researching the blood-brain barrier a bit now as an alternative explanation to the leaky gut (though I do believe gut dysbiosis is a problem, my working hypothesis is that it's not all it's cracked up to be).

7636e1e02ef91a46f20a42e07b565a4b

(367)

on December 19, 2011
at 09:34 PM

I also wonder if stress is a huge factor, as this impairs the blood-brain barrier as well and I've always been a high-stress person. Another factor I'm looking at is nutrient deficiencies caused by high-ingestion of phenolics over time. For instance, tannins, a polyphenolic compound in coffee, chocolate, tea, etc. - binds with a number of minerals such as iron and zinc as well as amino acids, etc. I believe salicylates interfere with vitamin K absorption but I'll have to double check on that. Eventually I hope to synthesize this information in some form, on a blog or something - as it would be

E2b72f1912f777917d8ee6b7fba43c26

(2384)

on December 29, 2011
at 03:23 PM

Thanks very much for your priceless experiences, you are great! Best luck on your way! :-)

7636e1e02ef91a46f20a42e07b565a4b

(367)

on December 30, 2011
at 05:30 PM

Thank you, you too! They're definitely just my experiences and musings; I hope my theories are wrong, really. :) Best of luck to you too. :)

1
1f8384be58052b6b96f476e475abdc74

(2231)

on December 14, 2011
at 05:33 PM

i use it externally on my face, maybe a couple times a month take a spoonful, its got good vita E and A

E2b72f1912f777917d8ee6b7fba43c26

(2384)

on December 14, 2011
at 07:31 PM

are you salicylate sensitive?

1
96440612cf0fcf366bf5ad8f776fca84

(19413)

on December 14, 2011
at 05:17 PM

Don't know for sure, but this does not list them.

http://salicylatesensitivity.com/about/food-guide/fats-oils/

Hope this helps.

E2b72f1912f777917d8ee6b7fba43c26

(2384)

on December 14, 2011
at 07:30 PM

Thanks, but the question is, whether they didn't list palm oil, because it has no salicylates, or because they had just no information

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