1

votes

Canola, Vegetable, Soybean Oils vs. Olive, Coconut, Avocado Oils, etc.

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created August 03, 2012 at 3:55 PM

If this has already been asked, sorry! I couldn't find it anywhere. Anyway..

I have been wondering for some time now why vegetable oil seems to be shunned in this community, along with canola oil. I have often seen them referred to as "refined/processed fats" or something of that nature. But isn't that exactly what olive, coconut, avocado, and all the other recommended oils are as well? I realize that the source of the oil is probably the determinant, but as far as I can tell, the sources of vegetable and canola oils seem to be paleo, at least to the best of my knowledge. I'm just curious as to why some processed fats on the market are preferable to others, since they're all fat anyway..

A7768b6c6be7f5d6acc76e5efa66464c

on August 04, 2012
at 01:05 AM

Is it the case that coconut oil, lard, butter, etc., cannot be oxidized as well? I think I've read that saturated fat resists oxidation, which if true, might suggest it's the saturated vs. unsaturated we should be paying most attention to.

A968087cc1dd66d480749c02e4619ef4

(20436)

on August 03, 2012
at 05:10 PM

On lower heat, like scrambled eggs, I use butter. I also use coconut oil, ghee, lard, bacon fat. I have some grass fed tallow in the freezer that I have yet to use. My wife does a lot of the dinner cooking and she likes olive oil. I can't seem to get her to switch (she is not paleo - not even close). I also grill a lot - no oil required.

C3bc92e6b5eba45dc55f43ac3c70cc25

on August 03, 2012
at 04:52 PM

Do you cook with animal fats? if yes, which type?

68294383ced9a0eafc16133aa80d1905

(5795)

on August 03, 2012
at 04:37 PM

"Used improperly" pretty much implies consuming them after already oxidized or oxidizing them (usually people do this w/cooking) and then consuming them. I supposed if you took unoxidized canola oil and did not damage it, consuming it wouldn't be nearly as bad. However, finding them in this form is nearly impossible.

0a9ad4e577fe24a6b8aafa1dd7a50c79

(5150)

on August 03, 2012
at 04:27 PM

PUFAs and MUFAs are not ideal for cooking. They oxidize easily (PUFAs are the worst, MUFAs are in the middle and SFAs oxidize the least.) If you're using PUFA-heavy oils for cooking purposes, you're consuming oxidized "rancid" oil. MUFA-heavy oils hold up pretty well to cooking, but they are still not perfect. SFAs are extremely difficult to oxidize.

26ec8fd161a2f282bf56ecbfc1510178

on August 03, 2012
at 04:20 PM

How do you mean "used improperly in cooking"?

26ec8fd161a2f282bf56ecbfc1510178

on August 03, 2012
at 04:19 PM

The links were really helpful, thanks!

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3 Answers

best answer

1
0a9ad4e577fe24a6b8aafa1dd7a50c79

on August 03, 2012
at 04:07 PM

http://www.marksdailyapple.com/healthy-oils/

http://www.marksdailyapple.com/dear-mark-canola-oil/

You can make coconut oil at home if you really needed to. But it's much easier to go to a store and buy it. And this is why health-conscious people purchase virgin coconut oil where chemical solvents (hexanes mostly) are not used to extract the oil.

Soybean oil is shit, just like soybeans are shit. Fermentation is the only thing capable of making soybeans worthwhile to eat.

26ec8fd161a2f282bf56ecbfc1510178

on August 03, 2012
at 04:19 PM

The links were really helpful, thanks!

4
A968087cc1dd66d480749c02e4619ef4

(20436)

on August 03, 2012
at 04:08 PM

Lets call them what they really are: grain and seed oils. There is no brocolli oil. Vegetable oils would not exist without industrial processing and really took off after the 1920's. Less processed oils are preferred, but that is not really the issue with canola/soy/corn oil.

The problem with them is the high omega-6 (linoleic acid) content, which is pro-inflammatory. Olive and avocado oil also have some n6, and are probably best used sparingly. Coconut oil and quality (pastured) animal fats such as tallow/ghee/butter, have either little n6 or much better n3/n6 ratios than the "vegetable" oils and are ideal.

C3bc92e6b5eba45dc55f43ac3c70cc25

on August 03, 2012
at 04:52 PM

Do you cook with animal fats? if yes, which type?

A968087cc1dd66d480749c02e4619ef4

(20436)

on August 03, 2012
at 05:10 PM

On lower heat, like scrambled eggs, I use butter. I also use coconut oil, ghee, lard, bacon fat. I have some grass fed tallow in the freezer that I have yet to use. My wife does a lot of the dinner cooking and she likes olive oil. I can't seem to get her to switch (she is not paleo - not even close). I also grill a lot - no oil required.

0
68294383ced9a0eafc16133aa80d1905

(5795)

on August 03, 2012
at 04:13 PM

If you're getting these oils in pristine forms without any oxidation and are using them in the correct way, they are fine. The concern is that A) these oils are generally sold to the consumer in a form that is already damaging and B) used improperly in cooking. For all intents and purposes, their use by humans causes negative effects. The other oils, specifically Coconut Oil, aren't damaged upon purchase and are difficult to get to a point where they cause negative effects.

The issue isn't always the oil itself, but the condition it's in when consumed.

68294383ced9a0eafc16133aa80d1905

(5795)

on August 03, 2012
at 04:37 PM

"Used improperly" pretty much implies consuming them after already oxidized or oxidizing them (usually people do this w/cooking) and then consuming them. I supposed if you took unoxidized canola oil and did not damage it, consuming it wouldn't be nearly as bad. However, finding them in this form is nearly impossible.

A7768b6c6be7f5d6acc76e5efa66464c

on August 04, 2012
at 01:05 AM

Is it the case that coconut oil, lard, butter, etc., cannot be oxidized as well? I think I've read that saturated fat resists oxidation, which if true, might suggest it's the saturated vs. unsaturated we should be paying most attention to.

0a9ad4e577fe24a6b8aafa1dd7a50c79

(5150)

on August 03, 2012
at 04:27 PM

PUFAs and MUFAs are not ideal for cooking. They oxidize easily (PUFAs are the worst, MUFAs are in the middle and SFAs oxidize the least.) If you're using PUFA-heavy oils for cooking purposes, you're consuming oxidized "rancid" oil. MUFA-heavy oils hold up pretty well to cooking, but they are still not perfect. SFAs are extremely difficult to oxidize.

26ec8fd161a2f282bf56ecbfc1510178

on August 03, 2012
at 04:20 PM

How do you mean "used improperly in cooking"?

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