2

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Benefits and amount of Fish Oil?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created October 10, 2011 at 12:32 PM

I have been reading a lot about Fish Oil and the benefits of supplementing Omega 3's into my diet and it got me thinking, for those that do this what benefits have you seen? I know what benefits Mark (MarksDailyApple) lists and other sites I found on google, but I was looking more for individual results. So if you don't mind:

1) What benefits have you seen? (Omega 3 supplementation) 2) How much do you take daily?

Thank you in advance! I was thinking of starting with 2 g per day (pill form).

Thanks,

Drifter

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on October 11, 2011
at 07:08 AM

And what happens to protein in the human gut ? Right...

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on October 11, 2011
at 07:07 AM

And what happens to protein in the gut ? Right...

32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41757)

on October 10, 2011
at 02:45 PM

* cheating = chelating

32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41757)

on October 10, 2011
at 02:37 PM

Supplementing with omega-3s to balance PUFAS is sort of like exercising for weight loss. It's hard to out-exercise a bad diet, it's hard to supplement enough to compensate for an omega-6-rich diet. In both cases, it's a helpful tool, but not the one-stop answer to the problem.

32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41757)

on October 10, 2011
at 02:19 PM

"In reality, however, heavy metal toxicity from consuming fish oil supplements is highly unlikely, because heavy metals selectively bind with protein in the fish flesh rather than accumulate in the oil." - http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Omega-3_fatty_acid

32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41757)

on October 10, 2011
at 02:16 PM

Yes, PCBs are an issue, but PCBs aren't metals, See: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Polychlorinated_biphenyl Metals associate with proteins. Mercury particularly likes sulfur-containing cysteine residues. There's all sorts of cheating side-chains in proteins that make them good partners for heavy metals.

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on October 10, 2011
at 02:13 PM

Another source: "Metals like Iron, Manganese, Magnesium and Nickel have proven to be persistent pollutants. Though present in traces and being lipophilic, heavy metals tend to bioaccumulate and biomagnify." http://sphinxsai.com/sphinxsaiVol_2No.1/ChemTech_Vol_2No.1/ChemTech_Vol_2No.1PDF/CT=97%20(620-623).pdf

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on October 10, 2011
at 02:11 PM

You are wrong. Also there are other things like PCB. Direct quote: "The levels of these metals in the fishes were higher than that obtained in the water samples from the same river. This could be attributed to **the metals being lipophilic**;" http://academicjournals.org/IJPS/PDF/Pdf2008/Nov/Ekpo%20et%20al..pdf

32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41757)

on October 10, 2011
at 02:04 PM

Heavy metals are not lipophilic, and aren't concentrated in the fats of ocean fish. When you see "mercury/heavy metal-free" on your fish oil bottle, it's more buzzword-y than anything. Analogous to everything not containing gluten being labeled "gluten-free".

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4 Answers

2
77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on October 10, 2011
at 01:11 PM

I think majority of sites suck because they offer no clue about the dosage in typical scenarios so we have questions like this.

Anyway, it really depends what you would like to achieve. If you would like to have 4:1 - 1:1 w-6/w-3 ratio or something similar you need to calculate how much you ingest via food. If you are at, lets say at 30g of w-6 per day you would need 1 tsp - 1tbsp fish oil to compensate if you didn't have any fish during the day or some other sources. This may be hard to calculate - for instance if you use sunflower oil and put 2 tbsp of it to cook some meat (30g) you got from 1 - 20 g of w-6 PUFA. You would need 2 tsp of fish oil to compensate if you didn't eat any fish.

If you want its anti-inflammatory effects for arthritis, diabetes etc.. you need to take 2g EPA/DHA (usually at least 4tsp).

If you want to threat psoriasis, some people report 5g DHA.

If you want to reduce tryglicerdies, the recommendation is 4g EPA/DHA.

To reduce CRP, 1.5g DHA/EPA for months.

For general anti-immunity dosage see this review. Dose ranges are from 2-18g DHA/EPA.

If you want to help metabolic syndrome and weight loss 1 - 1.5g DHA/EPA should be enough (1-2tbsp)

Pills are usually not that potent to be honest and contain very small doses, typically not more then 200 DHA/EPA which is very low dose. For pregnancy, the dose is often 250mg DHA but it is aimed to be multiple times moleculary destiled to remove heavy metals.

I think good dose for the start is 0.5 - 1g DHA/EPA. You may want to add some ALA too.

Keep in mind that beneficial activity of fatty acids are most prominent with DHA then EPA then ALA. You don't look the weight of the tablet as it only contains % of those fatty acids. Other omega-3s in fish oil may not be beneficial at all and might even be harmful in larger doses.

My suggestion is to take good liquid fish oil containing at least 500mg DHA/EPA per tbsp, add 200 IU mixed tocopherols in it or ascorbyl palmitate and keep in fridge. There are some claims that fish oil may be negative, see here but its IMO made up from BS science and desire for attention.

At the end, consuming selenium + vitamin C before fish oil might be good idea to prevent eventual toxicity with hard metals.

My benefits: far less depression and gingivitis is apparent. I take between 0.5 - 2g DHA/EPA as supplement. I also do eat fish regularly during week (lets say 2 times average).

The story above will make you think about individual responses as they depend on underlying patophysiology and correctly determined dosage.

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on October 11, 2011
at 07:08 AM

And what happens to protein in the human gut ? Right...

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on October 10, 2011
at 02:11 PM

You are wrong. Also there are other things like PCB. Direct quote: "The levels of these metals in the fishes were higher than that obtained in the water samples from the same river. This could be attributed to **the metals being lipophilic**;" http://academicjournals.org/IJPS/PDF/Pdf2008/Nov/Ekpo%20et%20al..pdf

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on October 11, 2011
at 07:07 AM

And what happens to protein in the gut ? Right...

32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41757)

on October 10, 2011
at 02:19 PM

"In reality, however, heavy metal toxicity from consuming fish oil supplements is highly unlikely, because heavy metals selectively bind with protein in the fish flesh rather than accumulate in the oil." - http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Omega-3_fatty_acid

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on October 10, 2011
at 02:13 PM

Another source: "Metals like Iron, Manganese, Magnesium and Nickel have proven to be persistent pollutants. Though present in traces and being lipophilic, heavy metals tend to bioaccumulate and biomagnify." http://sphinxsai.com/sphinxsaiVol_2No.1/ChemTech_Vol_2No.1/ChemTech_Vol_2No.1PDF/CT=97%20(620-623).pdf

32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41757)

on October 10, 2011
at 02:16 PM

Yes, PCBs are an issue, but PCBs aren't metals, See: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Polychlorinated_biphenyl Metals associate with proteins. Mercury particularly likes sulfur-containing cysteine residues. There's all sorts of cheating side-chains in proteins that make them good partners for heavy metals.

32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41757)

on October 10, 2011
at 02:45 PM

* cheating = chelating

32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41757)

on October 10, 2011
at 02:04 PM

Heavy metals are not lipophilic, and aren't concentrated in the fats of ocean fish. When you see "mercury/heavy metal-free" on your fish oil bottle, it's more buzzword-y than anything. Analogous to everything not containing gluten being labeled "gluten-free".

1
32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41757)

on October 10, 2011
at 02:11 PM

I've found that I definitely have better overall well-being on fish oil then without. It takes a few days of not taking fish oil and unbalanced PUFAs for me to notice the aches and pains starting to crop up.

I'm currently taking 1.5 g EPA and 1 g DHA daily. This is on top of a pretty tight diet, fat sources being: mostly grass-fed or wild meats, minimal refined oils (only coconut, olive, butter).

1
Cdee7454bccdc4ac14ec23b9657eb573

on October 10, 2011
at 01:21 PM

Hi, Eric.

Two grams of fish oil daily sounds like a good staring point. William Lands, Ph.D., is a leading expert on omega-6/omega-3 fatty acid ratio and fatty acid metabolism. He would say it's just as important to cut down on omega-6 fatty acid intake as it is to increase omega-3s. He would add: "Don't eat too much" overall.

For me personally, I try to eat cold-water fatty fish at least twice weekly, for the omega-3s. If I skip my canned tuna or sardines, it seems I have more joint aching. Could be coincidence or placebo effect, I suppose.

-Steve

32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41757)

on October 10, 2011
at 02:37 PM

Supplementing with omega-3s to balance PUFAS is sort of like exercising for weight loss. It's hard to out-exercise a bad diet, it's hard to supplement enough to compensate for an omega-6-rich diet. In both cases, it's a helpful tool, but not the one-stop answer to the problem.

0
B097b0a1e9dcf9a67940687f84f9749b

on January 31, 2012
at 03:34 PM

Check out these 3 links just recently written

http://chriskresser.com/why-fish-stomps-flax-as-a-source-of-omega-3
http://chriskresser.com/how-too-much-omega-6-and-not-enough-omega-3-is-making-us-sick
http://chriskresser.com/how-much-omega-3-is-enough-that-depends-on-omega-6

The last one will probably answer your question the best, but the other two are still useful reading

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