2

votes

What Offal Do You Eat in Chinese Restaurants?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created April 09, 2011 at 9:37 PM

So I live in the San Francisco Bay Area where you can find authentic Chinese restaurants, not the Made-For-White-Boys Chinese restaurants you find in much of the rest of the US. As such, at the better ones you can get quite a wide variety of offal. Today I had duck tongue, tripe and chicken feet. Do you think that given these are not organic that some of the offal, such as kidney (which I could have had today), would be over-the-top with toxins?

0bd9775b305d2a602d496649982bc614

(252)

on January 29, 2012
at 05:46 PM

I think geoff is being a smart-ass douchebag. "Made for white boy chinese" in this context is nothing offensive. Unless you are an already offended person in general.. geoff maybe you just are unnecessarily offensive and offended. keep in mind that it makes other readers uncomfortable.

0bd9775b305d2a602d496649982bc614

(252)

on January 29, 2012
at 05:44 PM

i think geoff is being a smart-ass douchebag. "made for white boy chinese" in this context is nothing offensive. unless you are an already offered person in general. geoff you just are unnecessarily offensive and offended. keep in mind that it makes other readers uncomfortable.

B0fe7b5a9a197cd293978150cbd9055f

(8938)

on December 08, 2011
at 06:27 PM

I don't really think that's a good way to judge a restaurant :). I've seen lots of fat butchers, that doesn't make me hesitate at all when I indulge in yet another juicy steak. Also : everything that isn't muscle meat is offal, I believe. Though I agree it's not really fair to call tongue or heart offal.

B22e5946e28a1845a6006737e59edfc6

(2437)

on April 11, 2011
at 10:31 PM

Well you should travel some more. Every major US city has authentic Chinese food. To me the statement you made reeks of ethnocentrism which the Bay Area is often accused of (we think we are culturally superior to the rest of the country). Also "white-boy" is like "gweilo (鬼佬)" it can be neutral but it also can be a derogatory phrase.

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on April 11, 2011
at 04:24 PM

Occasional "diversity over purity" is a really good idea.

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on April 11, 2011
at 04:23 PM

Why, Geoff? There are a lot of Chinese restaurants that cater to a non-Chinese diners, even in the Bay Area. From my experience, the great majority of Chinese restaurants in other parts of the country are that way. That's what I refer to. Unlike "douchebag", my "not-made-for-whiteboys" was not intended to be pejorative.

B22e5946e28a1845a6006737e59edfc6

(2437)

on April 11, 2011
at 07:44 AM

From a fellow Bay Area resident, this phrase "not the Made-For-White-Boys," makes you sound like a douchebag.

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on April 10, 2011
at 05:19 PM

I think they put sugar on everything in those "faux" Chinese restaurants. What you have to worry about in authentic Chinese restaurants is MSG.

Fa9f340eddbad9a544184c688fa4dcdd

(6433)

on April 10, 2011
at 02:30 PM

I guess it also depends on the prevailing restaurant culture; is dining out considered something everyday or a special event?

Cab7e4ef73c5d7d7a77e1c3d7f5773a1

(7304)

on April 10, 2011
at 12:02 PM

They fry everything in soybean oil too. Bleh.

9f9fa49265e03ddd2bf2bba5477a556b

(3184)

on April 10, 2011
at 07:38 AM

I always see lots of infirm, morbidly obese seniors at restaurants. That is generally how they get infirm and morbidly obese.

5672b2d190891342389e764cc4056ca9

(1304)

on April 10, 2011
at 04:05 AM

JansSushiBar: Duck tongue is an appetizer, and is usally served with a few other small dishes, before the main courses. No need to be hungry...

5672b2d190891342389e764cc4056ca9

(1304)

on April 10, 2011
at 01:31 AM

JansSushiBar: Duck tongue is an appetizer, and is usally served with a few other small dishes, before the main courses. No need to be hungry if you know how to order in a Chinese restaurant...

Fa9f340eddbad9a544184c688fa4dcdd

(6433)

on April 10, 2011
at 12:54 AM

Even if that were true,surely there would be some sort of self-selection bias in effect, as the average infirm and morbidly obese senior citizen is unlikely to be out patronising restaurants.

2b423e7f4d4d6e13e820dcee5a3be746

(143)

on April 10, 2011
at 12:41 AM

Lol. Chinese people don't LIVE in the restaurant and only eat there and no where else. Silly American.

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on April 09, 2011
at 11:11 PM

I will tell you that is the most difficult thing for me to eat. They do nothing to disguise that it is what it is. It looks just like a duck tongue and I have to distract myself with other thoughts in order to be able to eat it.

91c2e2a35e578e2e79ce7d631b753879

(2081)

on April 09, 2011
at 10:22 PM

I don't know - I'm still trying to figure out how much duck tongue you'd have to have to make a decent meal...

  • 77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

    asked by

    (78467)
  • Views
    3.2K
  • Last Activity
    1432D AGO
Frontpage book

Get FREE instant access to our Paleo For Beginners Guide & 15 FREE Recipes!

6 Answers

2
77ecc37f89dbe8f783179323916bd8e6

(5002)

on April 11, 2011
at 05:40 AM

I recently ate Kung Pao Kidney in a Chinese restaurant in Chicago's Chinatown. It was delicious.

I didn't worry about oil or sugar contents because:
(a) I don't eat offal in Chinatown regularly;
(b) I'm pretty sure non-organic kidneys are fine (I consumed fish oil pills afterward, just like I do every time I eat conventional meat); and
(c) at least some of the bad stuff was counterbalanced by the nutrient gains from eating so much kidney.

It doesn't really matter, but I'll note that almost all of the patrons were Chinese (or at least Asian), and I don't remember any of them being obese.

Lastly, if I keep my diet too restricted my gut becomes overly sensitive to impurities, which is a state that I don't prefer. About once a week I choose to put diversity over purity when faced with a tough decision (like kidney cooked in unknown oils).

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on April 11, 2011
at 04:24 PM

Occasional "diversity over purity" is a really good idea.

2
Fa9f340eddbad9a544184c688fa4dcdd

(6433)

on April 10, 2011
at 12:17 AM

The Persistant Organic Pollutants (POPs) which you are concerned about are stored in the animal's fat tissues, making very lean organ meats like liver, kidney etc a safer bet than conventional muscle meats.

1
5672b2d190891342389e764cc4056ca9

(1304)

on April 10, 2011
at 04:03 AM

If you have no problems eating meat from conventionally raised animals, then I don't think you should worry about the type of cut.

Personally, when I eat Chinese I'm more concerned about the oils used (and reused) to cook, and additives like MSG. BTW, if you can find them where you live, try pig or duck intestines: heavenly...

1
B2157bdf4a217ac943c41125d1a67845

(258)

on April 10, 2011
at 04:03 AM

They put sugar on everything. I can't find anything to eat in a Chinese restaurant.

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on April 10, 2011
at 05:19 PM

I think they put sugar on everything in those "faux" Chinese restaurants. What you have to worry about in authentic Chinese restaurants is MSG.

Cab7e4ef73c5d7d7a77e1c3d7f5773a1

(7304)

on April 10, 2011
at 12:02 PM

They fry everything in soybean oil too. Bleh.

0
18142e3c7afbe464f2f9cc5da511e4bd

on January 29, 2012
at 05:04 PM

I live in China and although it's easy to eat Paleo here when I'm cooking at home it can be very difficult to eat out due to the reliance on soy bean oil and a lot of added sugar. If you want to practice your mandarin you can request that your food be cooked in lard:

"Qing ni bu yao yong dou you. Yong zhu you. xie xie."

"Please don't use soy bean oil. Use lard. Thank you."

This might also be helpful:

"Wo dui xiao mai guo min" - "I'm allergic to gluten."

ji xin - chicken heart (These are awesome if you can find a Chinese restaurant that does bbq!)

ji gan - chicken liver

Of course if you haven't tried it yet, find a restaurant that does Beijing duck. The skin of the bird is crisp and absolutely to die for - in Chinese it's "Bei jing kao ya"

It's actually really unfortunate that the Chinese are not cooking like they did traditionally by using lard and other animal fats. Western dietary advice and the industrialized food supply has made it to China. (Fat people will follow!)

0
9f9fa49265e03ddd2bf2bba5477a556b

(3184)

on April 09, 2011
at 11:21 PM

Do tongue and feet really count as offal? Don't get me wrong, they're delicious, they're just not organs.

As for how toxin riddled they are, I'd look around and see how healthy looking all the old Chinese folks are at the restaurant. If their seniors aren't morbidly obese and sickly looking and fairly mobile, eh, you're probably good.

Fa9f340eddbad9a544184c688fa4dcdd

(6433)

on April 10, 2011
at 02:30 PM

I guess it also depends on the prevailing restaurant culture; is dining out considered something everyday or a special event?

Fa9f340eddbad9a544184c688fa4dcdd

(6433)

on April 10, 2011
at 12:54 AM

Even if that were true,surely there would be some sort of self-selection bias in effect, as the average infirm and morbidly obese senior citizen is unlikely to be out patronising restaurants.

2b423e7f4d4d6e13e820dcee5a3be746

(143)

on April 10, 2011
at 12:41 AM

Lol. Chinese people don't LIVE in the restaurant and only eat there and no where else. Silly American.

9f9fa49265e03ddd2bf2bba5477a556b

(3184)

on April 10, 2011
at 07:38 AM

I always see lots of infirm, morbidly obese seniors at restaurants. That is generally how they get infirm and morbidly obese.

B0fe7b5a9a197cd293978150cbd9055f

(8938)

on December 08, 2011
at 06:27 PM

I don't really think that's a good way to judge a restaurant :). I've seen lots of fat butchers, that doesn't make me hesitate at all when I indulge in yet another juicy steak. Also : everything that isn't muscle meat is offal, I believe. Though I agree it's not really fair to call tongue or heart offal.

Answer Question


Get FREE instant access to our
Paleo For Beginners Guide & 15 FREE Recipes!