1

votes

Is losing weight healthy?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created February 29, 2012 at 9:57 PM

This thought is spawned by the suggestion that the release of free fatty acids into the blood stream can have some deleterious effects. However, I am not challenging that statement as I believe there is a more important question we should be asking. It's well accepted that obesity is associated with a decreased life expectancy. Is there any information of weight loss resulting in an increased life expectancy? Is it possible that the tendency to become obese is related to the tendency to die of diseases of civilization and that the obesity in and of itself is not causal? I feel that a legitimate study on this topic would be rather difficult to take on for many reasons, but primarily because the rise in obesity and dieting has been quite recent (and changing in nature, for that matter) and we haven't really had time to see if dieting is effective in prolonging life.

I certainly acknowledge that losing weight is a great thing for people the vast majority of the time, but it's possible that all of the benefits are derived from superficial and/or delusional benefits. I'm not saying they necessarily are delusional nor that delusional benefits are even necessarily bad, but I think it's fair to accept the possibility. I also acknowledge that the vast majority of people that lose weight believe they have become healthier because of it.

That point acknowledged, is losing weight for health purposes really any different than taking a drug to get a particular lab value in range?

And personally I'd still want to lose weight even if it takes 10 years off my life, that's not the point I'm trying to make. I'm just curious if there's any information out there that shows losing weight is any better for your health than finding god and joining the church.

EDIT: I thought this might be a more simple topic to tackle than my real question, which would be: If someone has reached a point where they are having a very difficult time losing weight, how beneficial is it for them to keep trying? Obviously context can play a role, but I feel like weight/fatness might be over-valued as a health marker in the pursuit of "health". And would it make a person "more healthy" to keep losing weight because they want to?

Also note that this is not a question about me. Nor am I looking for advice.

1f9b52f29960095986234231d91e1967

(529)

on October 03, 2013
at 02:06 PM

Well-written answer. Is also something which has been very interesting to me: "There is the 'fat but fit' paradox that gets reported on every so often, but I think with time it will become much less paradoxical if we can move beyond obesity as 'the' marker of health."

1f9b52f29960095986234231d91e1967

(529)

on October 03, 2013
at 02:03 PM

Fascinating book -- I had not seen it before.

Thank you for mentioning it.

Medium avatar

(10611)

on May 05, 2013
at 07:58 PM

99% of people are not overthinking their obesity so are not aware of all these straw men. Do some regain? Do some damage their hearts with amphetamines? Do some become anorexic. Yes to all three, affecting less than 1% of the population and very few of the obese. Would an obese person benefit from losing weight. Yes, for many reasons. But the poster of this question isn't interested in people that would benefit. He's picking fights on minutiae. DON'T FEED THE TROLL.

Medium avatar

(10611)

on May 05, 2013
at 07:45 PM

Your intent seems to be baiting people so you can flame them all as hopeless losers. Raising their stress levels. This is an old post, but I'll vote to close it now.

Medium avatar

(10611)

on May 05, 2013
at 07:38 PM

Maybe if you're a special snowflake obesity won't give you a heart attack and stroke. Just keep your head in the sand and you won't see the carnage around you.

Medium avatar

(10611)

on May 05, 2013
at 07:34 PM

Life is the main game for sure. I've never had much trouble with the gogogo part but the high blood pressure and diabetes resulting from obesity would have killed me dead if I hadn't dealt with it.

Medium avatar

(10611)

on May 05, 2013
at 07:28 PM

When someone plays the diseases of civilization card they're out of trumps for the weak hand they're holding. We're all just victims! So just stay fat!

Medium avatar

(10611)

on May 05, 2013
at 07:19 PM

Obesity was not benign for me.

22424c9eef944ade83d4e4ffda907056

(1402)

on March 01, 2012
at 01:33 AM

I'm not denying that caloric restriction can, and most of the time does, result in weight loss. But it's pretty well accepted that a caloric restriction diet can be unsuccessful and this instance is where my question becomes particularly pertinent.

22424c9eef944ade83d4e4ffda907056

(1402)

on March 01, 2012
at 01:18 AM

Cool. Thank you.

22424c9eef944ade83d4e4ffda907056

(1402)

on March 01, 2012
at 01:09 AM

As for health markers, I'm also questioning those because obesity itself is considered a health marker and I don't know how legitimate that is. I suppose my intention is not to get an answer, I just want people to think a little bit and hopefully I did that. And I know the people I've been arguing with are hopeless for now.

22424c9eef944ade83d4e4ffda907056

(1402)

on March 01, 2012
at 01:06 AM

Science doesn't answer everything. The only way you can say there is a flaw to my argument is if you don't understand it. I'm basically asking if obesity and health can exist mutually. I figured most people don't believe they can, but I didn't expect this much blind trust in "associations" and "correlations".

3846a3b61bc9051e4baebdef62e58c52

(18635)

on March 01, 2012
at 12:55 AM

I will tell you one thing you'll find is that overweight (dunno about obese) people who are very active have better health markers than normal weight sedentary individuals....that is a place to start....but what are health markers? Do you agree with what measurements they use to define health? Get specific and do some science rather than just practicing philosophical debate. Use logic and science together to arrive at a conclusion.

3846a3b61bc9051e4baebdef62e58c52

(18635)

on March 01, 2012
at 12:52 AM

Your argument is just so flawed that its hard to provide a response. Its not really our fault you see? Define your terms...what is healthy? What is quality of life? How are you measuring these things? Give something that can be measured and then go do some research about how obese people stack up to non-obese in these measurements. Get back to us and let us know what you find.

5e36f73c3f95eb4ea13a009f4936449f

(8280)

on March 01, 2012
at 12:51 AM

Show me obese people that do life extension style CR for any length of time. Most of the pictures you see of those types are along the lines of scrawny half-dead concentration camp survivors.

22424c9eef944ade83d4e4ffda907056

(1402)

on March 01, 2012
at 12:42 AM

Why is it when I ask a question acknowledging associations and correlations I just get my acknowledgments puked up and fed to me like a baby bird? This is not about fat people dying from a heart attack, it's about a fat person that dies at 75 from getting in a car accident. And I bet obesity is hugely associated with a poor quality of life but I think that has to do more with the social aspect than the health aspect.

3846a3b61bc9051e4baebdef62e58c52

(18635)

on March 01, 2012
at 12:38 AM

If you retain the symptom then how can you claim to have fixed the underlying metabolic/hormonal dysfunction. That is not to say that it all happens spontaneously, but there is cause and effect.

3846a3b61bc9051e4baebdef62e58c52

(18635)

on March 01, 2012
at 12:36 AM

Obesity is one of, but not the only symptom of metabolic syndrome that is associated with reduced quality of life and early death.

3846a3b61bc9051e4baebdef62e58c52

(18635)

on March 01, 2012
at 12:30 AM

LOL....Mmmmmkay friend...I aint your friend guy!....I aint your guy buddy! (couldn't resist the terrance and phillip reference since your so like your "boss, and buddys" and such). So will just losing weight via chopping off a leg or becoming a heroine addict make you immune to diseases of civilization....No. There your right. Now go eat a paleo diet, do some exercise, and be well.

22424c9eef944ade83d4e4ffda907056

(1402)

on March 01, 2012
at 12:27 AM

The fallacies are reflective of your comment. Health isn't as simple as you think it is. Just give it 6 months or a year and you'll realize that this simple view you have is far too optimistic.

22424c9eef944ade83d4e4ffda907056

(1402)

on March 01, 2012
at 12:22 AM

No, buddy, you missed the point. Obesity is correlated with diseases of civilization. However, being obese does not mean you will die of a disease of civilization nor does it mean you will die young. Is it possible that being prone to obesity is what is correlated with diseases of civilization rather than being obese itself. Therefore, are you doing yourself any favors by losing weight if you're still just as prone to dying of diseases of civilization? The desert island question is to prove my point that losing weight is largely a social accomplishment and not necessarily a health one.

E0250b1e6dc5ec1539ffb745042b4d80

(3651)

on March 01, 2012
at 12:18 AM

There are more logical fallacies in that comment than there are words! I'm guessing you are in way over your head, trolling, or joking. I'm moving on. Good luck!

22424c9eef944ade83d4e4ffda907056

(1402)

on March 01, 2012
at 12:16 AM

Don't worry DFH, you just don't get it. I'm not trying to find an excuse for why obesity is okay, you might notice that I even said I'd rather die 10 years early than be fat. I'm just pointing out a potential logical fallacy that our entire society believes. We seem to think just because there's a correlation that being obese is a problem and needs to be fixed.

3846a3b61bc9051e4baebdef62e58c52

(18635)

on March 01, 2012
at 12:12 AM

You miss the point.....but, lets go with the hypothetical island where I am likely now an ACTUAL hunter gatherer. I believe my physiology and body type will become that of the aforementioned people. Unless this is the hypothetical desert island of candy canes and pop tarts :)

22424c9eef944ade83d4e4ffda907056

(1402)

on March 01, 2012
at 12:09 AM

So kids with leukemia either had a lifetime-worth of damage in a few years or their body can't handle hardly any damage. I never knew that health and longevity was so simple! You should write a book!

E0250b1e6dc5ec1539ffb745042b4d80

(3651)

on March 01, 2012
at 12:09 AM

If the obesity is physiological, then get to a dr. The longevity risk just went way up. I happen to have gone through this myself. I was over 310 and a hormone train wreck, aging fast at 48. Finally I found a doc that could sort it out. Lost the weight, blood tests awesome, health is so much better I could start a blog about it. Wait, I did... I don't understand why you keep looking for a technical excuse for why obesity is OK. It isn't. I hated it and Im glad I found help.

3846a3b61bc9051e4baebdef62e58c52

(18635)

on March 01, 2012
at 12:05 AM

Think that is the problem....losing weight is not guaranteed to be a linear process (although it may be) in the process of regaining your health. There are plenty of "injuries" that have been done to many obese peoples metabolisms over the years, and some of the fixes on the way back will take longer than others. In fact I've seen some references to retracing past injuries and re-experiencing the symptoms of those as we heal. This can be mistaken for a negative effect of what is actually the healing process.

22424c9eef944ade83d4e4ffda907056

(1402)

on March 01, 2012
at 12:04 AM

If you lived on a desert island alone, as the only person in the world, would you have any reason for wanting to lose weight, ever?

22424c9eef944ade83d4e4ffda907056

(1402)

on February 29, 2012
at 11:54 PM

Ahh, thanks for clearing that up boss. Just like if you're on the paleo diet and you don't gradually get down to your ideal weight (your mind's ideal, not your body's ideal, because you can't determine your body's ideal), then you're just doing the paleo diet wrong, it doesn't have anything to do with your body's physiology.

E0250b1e6dc5ec1539ffb745042b4d80

(3651)

on February 29, 2012
at 11:53 PM

The more you eat, the more toxins (natural and unnatural) you bring into your body to tear it up. Longevity is proportional to how much of the damage your body can handle over time.

E0250b1e6dc5ec1539ffb745042b4d80

(3651)

on February 29, 2012
at 11:47 PM

The answer is yes. Obesity is bad. If you are dieting "healthy" and stay obese, you are not dieting correctly.

22424c9eef944ade83d4e4ffda907056

(1402)

on February 29, 2012
at 11:46 PM

How do you know that humans have an obesity problem? (emphasis on problem)

E0250b1e6dc5ec1539ffb745042b4d80

(3651)

on February 29, 2012
at 11:44 PM

You find fat animals where people give animals people food. :)

22424c9eef944ade83d4e4ffda907056

(1402)

on February 29, 2012
at 11:44 PM

I really don't think we can say that CR = no obesity. It obviously makes sense that obesity would cause more stress on the body, but just because something makes sense does not make it true. The shortened lifespan of obese people could even relate, to some extent, to the inverse of the CR = extended life correlation because being obese tends to involve consumption of a greater amount of calories.

22424c9eef944ade83d4e4ffda907056

(1402)

on February 29, 2012
at 11:35 PM

Excess weight may take a toll on the joints, but how do you know that the problem is not related to poor nutrition or other potentially unhealthy factors (like not exercising)? And I'm not saying that obesity is okay in all situations. What I'm asking is if obesity is inherently bad, which is essentially asking that if someone eats a "healthy diet" and a "healthy lifestyle" but is still obese, would it benefit them to continue to try to lose weight?

22424c9eef944ade83d4e4ffda907056

(1402)

on February 29, 2012
at 11:32 PM

I've seen a lot of fat raccoons and squirrels in my day. Seriously, go to a college campus.

22424c9eef944ade83d4e4ffda907056

(1402)

on February 29, 2012
at 11:31 PM

How do you know what the function of cancer is? The concept of dysfunction only exists with a desired outcome. Desired outcomes are not objective unless it is desired through objectivity (which it rarely is).

E0250b1e6dc5ec1539ffb745042b4d80

(3651)

on February 29, 2012
at 11:27 PM

Find us another species on Earth that has an obesity problem. It's just us! Humans are alone in that they changed lifestyle and diet and developed a very unnatural problem called obesity.

22424c9eef944ade83d4e4ffda907056

(1402)

on February 29, 2012
at 11:26 PM

Good advice! http://www.everydayhealth.com/weight/low-fat-diet-benefits.aspx I didn't realize that losing weight by eating a low fat diet will reduce my risk of heart disease!

Fb67dc30cead043d1d13ea503a3044dc

(3280)

on February 29, 2012
at 11:23 PM

Cancer is natural and very common, and is a runaway function built into our physiology.

24df4e0d0e7ce98963d4641fae1a60e5

on February 29, 2012
at 11:22 PM

I missread a little, but I was specifically responding to the notion that the FFA's from mobilizing fat would even be deleterious in weight loss. Sorry. Weight loss in and of itself will improve your health to the degree that the excess weight is impacting it to begin with. If you're one of those metabolically healthy overweight folks, losing weight probably doesn't do much for you. If you're a recently diagnosed T2 who is obese ... doing so could very well save your life.

E0250b1e6dc5ec1539ffb745042b4d80

(3651)

on February 29, 2012
at 11:21 PM

Excess weight taxes your health in many, many ways. There is no way around it. It's a fact of biology. Link: http://stanfordhospital.org/clinicsmedServices/COE/surgicalServices/generalSurgery/bariatricsurgery/obesity/effects.html I'm not promoting their surgery at all, that was just a quick google on health problems.

22424c9eef944ade83d4e4ffda907056

(1402)

on February 29, 2012
at 11:09 PM

Thank you, good answer. What if an obese person restricts calories and does not lose weight or loses weight but still levels out at an obese weight, would they improve their health by further trying to lose weight? (I don't expect there to be an answer for that but it's the logical follow up)

22424c9eef944ade83d4e4ffda907056

(1402)

on February 29, 2012
at 11:00 PM

Can obesity exist exclusive from disease? And therefore be benign?

22424c9eef944ade83d4e4ffda907056

(1402)

on February 29, 2012
at 10:58 PM

I'm not sure how you can say obesity is not normal. It's natural and very common. Is it not a function built into our physiology?

22424c9eef944ade83d4e4ffda907056

(1402)

on February 29, 2012
at 10:55 PM

Did you just read the first sentence and decide to respond? I'm specifically not discussing free fatty acids.

D1728f99db66ff91d695a6df5cd38b02

(1368)

on February 29, 2012
at 10:05 PM

You ask about the possibility "and that the obesity in and of itself is not causal?" Obesity is not the cause of disease but a symptom of disease, you are absolutely correct there.

  • 22424c9eef944ade83d4e4ffda907056

    asked by

    (1402)
  • Views
    2.1K
  • Last Activity
    1433D AGO
Frontpage book

Get FREE instant access to our Paleo For Beginners Guide & 15 FREE Recipes!

9 Answers

5
3846a3b61bc9051e4baebdef62e58c52

(18635)

on February 29, 2012
at 11:44 PM

Dylan....In a word no obesity can not be benign. Nor is taking a drug to manipulate values into a preconceived range anywhere close to the same thing as losing weight to reach the same goals.

Couple of short points. Manipulating lab values without consideration that your values are where they are for a reason is the height of folly. The body has innate intelligence to carry out and adapt physiology to current environmental cues. Change the cues/stressors ....not the end effect for health.

Obesity comes with hormonal disarray. Don't treat the obesity....don't treat lab figures....treat health. Recognize what promotes health and do it.

3846a3b61bc9051e4baebdef62e58c52

(18635)

on March 01, 2012
at 12:30 AM

LOL....Mmmmmkay friend...I aint your friend guy!....I aint your guy buddy! (couldn't resist the terrance and phillip reference since your so like your "boss, and buddys" and such). So will just losing weight via chopping off a leg or becoming a heroine addict make you immune to diseases of civilization....No. There your right. Now go eat a paleo diet, do some exercise, and be well.

22424c9eef944ade83d4e4ffda907056

(1402)

on March 01, 2012
at 12:22 AM

No, buddy, you missed the point. Obesity is correlated with diseases of civilization. However, being obese does not mean you will die of a disease of civilization nor does it mean you will die young. Is it possible that being prone to obesity is what is correlated with diseases of civilization rather than being obese itself. Therefore, are you doing yourself any favors by losing weight if you're still just as prone to dying of diseases of civilization? The desert island question is to prove my point that losing weight is largely a social accomplishment and not necessarily a health one.

22424c9eef944ade83d4e4ffda907056

(1402)

on March 01, 2012
at 12:04 AM

If you lived on a desert island alone, as the only person in the world, would you have any reason for wanting to lose weight, ever?

3846a3b61bc9051e4baebdef62e58c52

(18635)

on March 01, 2012
at 12:12 AM

You miss the point.....but, lets go with the hypothetical island where I am likely now an ACTUAL hunter gatherer. I believe my physiology and body type will become that of the aforementioned people. Unless this is the hypothetical desert island of candy canes and pop tarts :)

Medium avatar

(10611)

on May 05, 2013
at 07:28 PM

When someone plays the diseases of civilization card they're out of trumps for the weak hand they're holding. We're all just victims! So just stay fat!

3
32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41747)

on February 29, 2012
at 10:08 PM

Is losing weight for health purposes different than using a drug? Yes. It's restoring state of normalcy, rather a deranged state. Taking a drug, you're still deranged, as the underlying cause has not been rectified, rather a symptom has been masked.

Fb67dc30cead043d1d13ea503a3044dc

(3280)

on February 29, 2012
at 11:23 PM

Cancer is natural and very common, and is a runaway function built into our physiology.

22424c9eef944ade83d4e4ffda907056

(1402)

on February 29, 2012
at 11:31 PM

How do you know what the function of cancer is? The concept of dysfunction only exists with a desired outcome. Desired outcomes are not objective unless it is desired through objectivity (which it rarely is).

22424c9eef944ade83d4e4ffda907056

(1402)

on February 29, 2012
at 11:46 PM

How do you know that humans have an obesity problem? (emphasis on problem)

E0250b1e6dc5ec1539ffb745042b4d80

(3651)

on February 29, 2012
at 11:44 PM

You find fat animals where people give animals people food. :)

22424c9eef944ade83d4e4ffda907056

(1402)

on February 29, 2012
at 10:58 PM

I'm not sure how you can say obesity is not normal. It's natural and very common. Is it not a function built into our physiology?

22424c9eef944ade83d4e4ffda907056

(1402)

on February 29, 2012
at 11:32 PM

I've seen a lot of fat raccoons and squirrels in my day. Seriously, go to a college campus.

E0250b1e6dc5ec1539ffb745042b4d80

(3651)

on February 29, 2012
at 11:27 PM

Find us another species on Earth that has an obesity problem. It's just us! Humans are alone in that they changed lifestyle and diet and developed a very unnatural problem called obesity.

2
4b97e3bb2ee4a9588783f5d56d687da1

on May 05, 2013
at 06:24 PM

for me, its not about weight its about energy. If you are healthy your body will tell you to get up and get moving.

Thats the measure. It should be your goal. How is your energy? Are you ready to GO GO GO? if not, regardless of size, you aren't healthy yet.

Medium avatar

(10611)

on May 05, 2013
at 07:34 PM

Life is the main game for sure. I've never had much trouble with the gogogo part but the high blood pressure and diabetes resulting from obesity would have killed me dead if I hadn't dealt with it.

1
6120c989fd5b69f42a0834b69b87955b

(24553)

on March 01, 2012
at 01:04 AM

I don't think it has all the answers to this question, but the book "The Obesity Myth" by Paul Campos certainly addresses this in an intelligent way, and discusses the dangers of focusing on obesity as a disease. I apologize, it has been a few years since I read it, and I don't want to put words in the author's mouth trying to recreate his argument here, but I recommend it if this idea interests you. Maybe someone else here has read it more recently and can chime in while I search for my copy.

There may very well be dangers involved in losing a lot of weight quickly, especially the way they used to do it with doctor prescribed amphetamines. Sure it cures the symptom, but the underlying cause is never addressed in that protocol, so the weight will come back once medication is stopped. Damage to the heart while being on amphetamines certainly isn't adding any years to the patient's life either. Starvation diets are also problematic if someone isn't able to utilize autophagy effectively, and can end up with a number of the same undernourishment problems as anorexics while still being quite heavy.

I've been trying to wrap my head around how mitochondrial changes between being in a non-obese/pre-obese state and the decline of mitochondria in obese/post-obese people effects weight regulation. Honestly, I'm in way over my head on that one, but it would appear that mineral deficiencies set off the domino effect. There was an obesity epidemic during the Great Depression when people were having trouble getting quality food and as a result ended up with some serious vitamin and mineral deficiencies.

The most interesting part of the book to me was the idea that carrying some extra weight seems to be protective in old age when the ability to absorb nutrients becomes compromised, so middle age spread might not be as bad as it is made out to be. A number of degenerative diseases in old age seem to be the result of wasting and malnutrition rather than "over-nutrition", and a low BMI going into old age is a risk factor for premature death. I'm not sure yet how to square the extra padding theory with the CRON research yet (although I suspect a big piece of CRON might have to do with minimizing NADs). Too much weight on joints can certainly be a problem, but not having that "yolk" to draw on in old age seems to cause us to degenerate and kick it more quickly. All the more reason to make sure we use premium fuel to build our bodies, those fat stores are our vitamin supply for later in life.

All that said, I feel like I have to put a big ol' disclaimer at the bottom of this, as it is hard to gather any real data on this idea in relation to paleo since researchers would be hard pressed to find many participants who abstain and have abstained from vegetable oils and grains for a good part of their lives. Someone who is heavy and ate Little Debbie cakes after every meal versus someone who is heavy on a hunter-gatherer diet would be a very different test subject. There is the "fat but fit" paradox that gets reported on every so often, but I think with time it will become much less paradoxical if we can move beyond obesity as "the" marker of health.

22424c9eef944ade83d4e4ffda907056

(1402)

on March 01, 2012
at 01:18 AM

Cool. Thank you.

Medium avatar

(10611)

on May 05, 2013
at 07:58 PM

99% of people are not overthinking their obesity so are not aware of all these straw men. Do some regain? Do some damage their hearts with amphetamines? Do some become anorexic. Yes to all three, affecting less than 1% of the population and very few of the obese. Would an obese person benefit from losing weight. Yes, for many reasons. But the poster of this question isn't interested in people that would benefit. He's picking fights on minutiae. DON'T FEED THE TROLL.

1f9b52f29960095986234231d91e1967

(529)

on October 03, 2013
at 02:03 PM

Fascinating book -- I had not seen it before.

Thank you for mentioning it.

1f9b52f29960095986234231d91e1967

(529)

on October 03, 2013
at 02:06 PM

Well-written answer. Is also something which has been very interesting to me: "There is the 'fat but fit' paradox that gets reported on every so often, but I think with time it will become much less paradoxical if we can move beyond obesity as 'the' marker of health."

1
E0250b1e6dc5ec1539ffb745042b4d80

(3651)

on February 29, 2012
at 11:14 PM

The information is everywhere to show that losing weight improves health. Just read something!

Quite a few people are doing Paleo for health and longevity and not even worried about weight because they don't need to lose. Losing weight is an added benefit of the health and longevity choice called Paleo.

I have no idea what to do with the last part on God and church. I googled and found this-

http://www.planetpace.com/

I think I'll pass. Those people are a lot more anxious to live a short life and meet Jesus than I am!

22424c9eef944ade83d4e4ffda907056

(1402)

on February 29, 2012
at 11:26 PM

Good advice! http://www.everydayhealth.com/weight/low-fat-diet-benefits.aspx I didn't realize that losing weight by eating a low fat diet will reduce my risk of heart disease!

1
208cbaf0624cec2f559089a0a891bd48

on February 29, 2012
at 11:03 PM

I don't know about losing weight particularly (I feel like it would be hard to measure whether someone losing weight improved their health as it's sort of an n=1 trial, and you don't really know what "would have" happened if they hadn't lost weight) but there have been many animal studies and some longitudinal survey type studies on human populations which suggest that caloric restriction may lead to increased longevity. This pubmed link is a sort of survey of research that has been done, but if you search for caloric restriction and longevity there are a large number of resources available.

3846a3b61bc9051e4baebdef62e58c52

(18635)

on March 01, 2012
at 12:05 AM

Think that is the problem....losing weight is not guaranteed to be a linear process (although it may be) in the process of regaining your health. There are plenty of "injuries" that have been done to many obese peoples metabolisms over the years, and some of the fixes on the way back will take longer than others. In fact I've seen some references to retracing past injuries and re-experiencing the symptoms of those as we heal. This can be mistaken for a negative effect of what is actually the healing process.

3846a3b61bc9051e4baebdef62e58c52

(18635)

on March 01, 2012
at 12:55 AM

I will tell you one thing you'll find is that overweight (dunno about obese) people who are very active have better health markers than normal weight sedentary individuals....that is a place to start....but what are health markers? Do you agree with what measurements they use to define health? Get specific and do some science rather than just practicing philosophical debate. Use logic and science together to arrive at a conclusion.

3846a3b61bc9051e4baebdef62e58c52

(18635)

on March 01, 2012
at 12:36 AM

Obesity is one of, but not the only symptom of metabolic syndrome that is associated with reduced quality of life and early death.

22424c9eef944ade83d4e4ffda907056

(1402)

on March 01, 2012
at 12:42 AM

Why is it when I ask a question acknowledging associations and correlations I just get my acknowledgments puked up and fed to me like a baby bird? This is not about fat people dying from a heart attack, it's about a fat person that dies at 75 from getting in a car accident. And I bet obesity is hugely associated with a poor quality of life but I think that has to do more with the social aspect than the health aspect.

3846a3b61bc9051e4baebdef62e58c52

(18635)

on March 01, 2012
at 12:52 AM

Your argument is just so flawed that its hard to provide a response. Its not really our fault you see? Define your terms...what is healthy? What is quality of life? How are you measuring these things? Give something that can be measured and then go do some research about how obese people stack up to non-obese in these measurements. Get back to us and let us know what you find.

22424c9eef944ade83d4e4ffda907056

(1402)

on March 01, 2012
at 12:16 AM

Don't worry DFH, you just don't get it. I'm not trying to find an excuse for why obesity is okay, you might notice that I even said I'd rather die 10 years early than be fat. I'm just pointing out a potential logical fallacy that our entire society believes. We seem to think just because there's a correlation that being obese is a problem and needs to be fixed.

22424c9eef944ade83d4e4ffda907056

(1402)

on February 29, 2012
at 11:09 PM

Thank you, good answer. What if an obese person restricts calories and does not lose weight or loses weight but still levels out at an obese weight, would they improve their health by further trying to lose weight? (I don't expect there to be an answer for that but it's the logical follow up)

22424c9eef944ade83d4e4ffda907056

(1402)

on February 29, 2012
at 11:54 PM

Ahh, thanks for clearing that up boss. Just like if you're on the paleo diet and you don't gradually get down to your ideal weight (your mind's ideal, not your body's ideal, because you can't determine your body's ideal), then you're just doing the paleo diet wrong, it doesn't have anything to do with your body's physiology.

E0250b1e6dc5ec1539ffb745042b4d80

(3651)

on March 01, 2012
at 12:09 AM

If the obesity is physiological, then get to a dr. The longevity risk just went way up. I happen to have gone through this myself. I was over 310 and a hormone train wreck, aging fast at 48. Finally I found a doc that could sort it out. Lost the weight, blood tests awesome, health is so much better I could start a blog about it. Wait, I did... I don't understand why you keep looking for a technical excuse for why obesity is OK. It isn't. I hated it and Im glad I found help.

22424c9eef944ade83d4e4ffda907056

(1402)

on March 01, 2012
at 01:06 AM

Science doesn't answer everything. The only way you can say there is a flaw to my argument is if you don't understand it. I'm basically asking if obesity and health can exist mutually. I figured most people don't believe they can, but I didn't expect this much blind trust in "associations" and "correlations".

22424c9eef944ade83d4e4ffda907056

(1402)

on February 29, 2012
at 11:35 PM

Excess weight may take a toll on the joints, but how do you know that the problem is not related to poor nutrition or other potentially unhealthy factors (like not exercising)? And I'm not saying that obesity is okay in all situations. What I'm asking is if obesity is inherently bad, which is essentially asking that if someone eats a "healthy diet" and a "healthy lifestyle" but is still obese, would it benefit them to continue to try to lose weight?

E0250b1e6dc5ec1539ffb745042b4d80

(3651)

on February 29, 2012
at 11:47 PM

The answer is yes. Obesity is bad. If you are dieting "healthy" and stay obese, you are not dieting correctly.

E0250b1e6dc5ec1539ffb745042b4d80

(3651)

on February 29, 2012
at 11:21 PM

Excess weight taxes your health in many, many ways. There is no way around it. It's a fact of biology. Link: http://stanfordhospital.org/clinicsmedServices/COE/surgicalServices/generalSurgery/bariatricsurgery/obesity/effects.html I'm not promoting their surgery at all, that was just a quick google on health problems.

3846a3b61bc9051e4baebdef62e58c52

(18635)

on March 01, 2012
at 12:38 AM

If you retain the symptom then how can you claim to have fixed the underlying metabolic/hormonal dysfunction. That is not to say that it all happens spontaneously, but there is cause and effect.

22424c9eef944ade83d4e4ffda907056

(1402)

on March 01, 2012
at 01:09 AM

As for health markers, I'm also questioning those because obesity itself is considered a health marker and I don't know how legitimate that is. I suppose my intention is not to get an answer, I just want people to think a little bit and hopefully I did that. And I know the people I've been arguing with are hopeless for now.

Medium avatar

(10611)

on May 05, 2013
at 07:45 PM

Your intent seems to be baiting people so you can flame them all as hopeless losers. Raising their stress levels. This is an old post, but I'll vote to close it now.

0
91e0f1239f496b46046b46785534da2e

on October 03, 2013
at 08:02 AM

Protein consumption is important, but it shouldn’t be the only, or even main, focus of your diet. The body needs protein, carbohydrates and fat, and emphasizing one more than the others leads to an imbalanced diet. [edit: suspect link removed]

0
5e36f73c3f95eb4ea13a009f4936449f

(8280)

on February 29, 2012
at 11:36 PM

There's a lot of research on life extension on calorie restriction (CR). I think we can say CR = no obesity. I don't think there's really much evidence on the human front, but a lot of animal studies.

In terms of obesity, I also believe there's a lot of info on obese people having a shorter life (more wear on tear on the circulatory sytem, accidents, etc).

22424c9eef944ade83d4e4ffda907056

(1402)

on March 01, 2012
at 12:09 AM

So kids with leukemia either had a lifetime-worth of damage in a few years or their body can't handle hardly any damage. I never knew that health and longevity was so simple! You should write a book!

5e36f73c3f95eb4ea13a009f4936449f

(8280)

on March 01, 2012
at 12:51 AM

Show me obese people that do life extension style CR for any length of time. Most of the pictures you see of those types are along the lines of scrawny half-dead concentration camp survivors.

22424c9eef944ade83d4e4ffda907056

(1402)

on March 01, 2012
at 12:27 AM

The fallacies are reflective of your comment. Health isn't as simple as you think it is. Just give it 6 months or a year and you'll realize that this simple view you have is far too optimistic.

22424c9eef944ade83d4e4ffda907056

(1402)

on March 01, 2012
at 01:33 AM

I'm not denying that caloric restriction can, and most of the time does, result in weight loss. But it's pretty well accepted that a caloric restriction diet can be unsuccessful and this instance is where my question becomes particularly pertinent.

E0250b1e6dc5ec1539ffb745042b4d80

(3651)

on February 29, 2012
at 11:53 PM

The more you eat, the more toxins (natural and unnatural) you bring into your body to tear it up. Longevity is proportional to how much of the damage your body can handle over time.

E0250b1e6dc5ec1539ffb745042b4d80

(3651)

on March 01, 2012
at 12:18 AM

There are more logical fallacies in that comment than there are words! I'm guessing you are in way over your head, trolling, or joking. I'm moving on. Good luck!

22424c9eef944ade83d4e4ffda907056

(1402)

on February 29, 2012
at 11:44 PM

I really don't think we can say that CR = no obesity. It obviously makes sense that obesity would cause more stress on the body, but just because something makes sense does not make it true. The shortened lifespan of obese people could even relate, to some extent, to the inverse of the CR = extended life correlation because being obese tends to involve consumption of a greater amount of calories.

0
24df4e0d0e7ce98963d4641fae1a60e5

on February 29, 2012
at 10:03 PM

I don't think FFA's are important much during fat loss -- they are being burned as needed. It's the unwanted (and chronic) FFA "deliveries" that are deleterious in the presence of overnutrition and a buildup of fat stores in the cells themselves.

22424c9eef944ade83d4e4ffda907056

(1402)

on February 29, 2012
at 10:55 PM

Did you just read the first sentence and decide to respond? I'm specifically not discussing free fatty acids.

24df4e0d0e7ce98963d4641fae1a60e5

on February 29, 2012
at 11:22 PM

I missread a little, but I was specifically responding to the notion that the FFA's from mobilizing fat would even be deleterious in weight loss. Sorry. Weight loss in and of itself will improve your health to the degree that the excess weight is impacting it to begin with. If you're one of those metabolically healthy overweight folks, losing weight probably doesn't do much for you. If you're a recently diagnosed T2 who is obese ... doing so could very well save your life.

Answer Question


Get FREE instant access to our
Paleo For Beginners Guide & 15 FREE Recipes!