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Trypsin Inhibitors in Nuts and Seeds

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created January 31, 2012 at 12:11 AM

I am aware of what these inhibitors can do, and I have heard that there are different types in nuts and seeds than in grains and legumes. But I could be wrong. My question is: does anyone know the extent of the damage caused by the trypsin inhibitors in just nuts and sees, how much is damaged based on an average amount eaten? And also if the enzymes they destroy or alter are able to regenerate sufficiently or with more effort; or if they regenerate at all? Thank you for anyone who has any advice or who has tried to help.

00c8eb3f6e6a1884216044ca29cf868a

on February 03, 2012
at 10:38 PM

Think of digestive enzymes like laundry detergent. They don't get recycled, they get used up, and when you run a new load (eat another meal) your body puts in more. Whether your last load got totally clean or not doesn't affect the next load. -- As I mentioned, this may be an oversimplification, because there may be long-term effects of incomplete digestion, like SIBO...but I can't think of any direct effect by which trypsin inhibitors inhibit future trypsin production. (If I'm wrong, please feel free to correct me.)

Aa1f07e23a47aed0d07b712645e0d213

(313)

on February 02, 2012
at 03:15 AM

And I forgot to say: your response was very valuable and it definitely gives me a better understanding and I really appreciate that.

Aa1f07e23a47aed0d07b712645e0d213

(313)

on February 02, 2012
at 03:12 AM

I am sorry I had to continue my comment: or from the meat in that meal?

Aa1f07e23a47aed0d07b712645e0d213

(313)

on February 02, 2012
at 03:11 AM

Yeah Stanton I am definitely dumb. I misread that and must have put my own spin on it as the part of the table I was reading was just stating how many TI units an average person was eating from that food group a day LOL. SO if these trypsin inhibitors destroyed the enzymes, our bodies don't go through a lot of trouble remaking them? Because from the studies I have read, there are TI's in nuts and seeds that irreversibly alter enzymes and render them inert or kill them. And what do you mean by the incompletely digested protein? Meaning from not being able to digest the protein from the nuts

Aa1f07e23a47aed0d07b712645e0d213

(313)

on January 31, 2012
at 11:46 PM

April LOL you found my other threads I definitely seem desperate. Someone on bodybuilding.com put a link to this thread in the post and mentioned it LOL. The document you left me has so much valuable content and has answered many of my questions for the subject. Thank you very much for this and you have been very helpful. I guess even meat has trypsin inhibitors and more than nuts according to this document. But I wonder if the ones in nuts and seeds are more aggressive or destroy the enzyme instead of inhibiting its action.

Medium avatar

(10663)

on January 31, 2012
at 04:28 AM

I don't know how helpful this will be: http://ddr.nal.usda.gov/dspace/bitstream/10113/23935/1/IND87036037.pdf

Medium avatar

(10663)

on January 31, 2012
at 04:25 AM

Wow I hope somebody answers because you seem to really want to know... especially since you posted this on PH, MDA AND bodybuilding.com.

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00c8eb3f6e6a1884216044ca29cf868a

on February 02, 2012
at 02:19 AM

Some information that may help:

  • Protease inhibitors (trypsin is a protease) stop digestive enzymes from breaking down proteins. Seeds have them so that even if they're swallowed, they won't get digested and will be crapped out while still viable.

  • Table 1 of the paper April linked shows that meat contains a tiny fraction (1/17th) of the trypsin inhibitors that nuts do PER GRAM OF PROTEIN, which is the important statistic.

  • Note that the Table 1 statistics are for uncooked foods, which is why the figure for eggs is so high. Egg whites contain a number of protease inhibitors which are broken down during cooking. Same with potatoes and other veggies: PIs are often deactivated by cooking. That's why raw chia seeds, raw flax seeds, and raw nuts are a big issue...and it's why eating only 6-8 raw red beans will put you in the hospital.

  • Digestive enzymes are secreted on demand and as needed. If their action is inhibited by a protease inhibitor, this will affect digestion of the protein you're eating right now...but AFAIK this won't have a direct effect on enzymes secreted at subesequent meals.

  • However, the other issues caused by incompletely digested protein could have longer-term effects.

JS

Aa1f07e23a47aed0d07b712645e0d213

(313)

on February 02, 2012
at 03:11 AM

Yeah Stanton I am definitely dumb. I misread that and must have put my own spin on it as the part of the table I was reading was just stating how many TI units an average person was eating from that food group a day LOL. SO if these trypsin inhibitors destroyed the enzymes, our bodies don't go through a lot of trouble remaking them? Because from the studies I have read, there are TI's in nuts and seeds that irreversibly alter enzymes and render them inert or kill them. And what do you mean by the incompletely digested protein? Meaning from not being able to digest the protein from the nuts

Aa1f07e23a47aed0d07b712645e0d213

(313)

on February 02, 2012
at 03:12 AM

I am sorry I had to continue my comment: or from the meat in that meal?

Aa1f07e23a47aed0d07b712645e0d213

(313)

on February 02, 2012
at 03:15 AM

And I forgot to say: your response was very valuable and it definitely gives me a better understanding and I really appreciate that.

00c8eb3f6e6a1884216044ca29cf868a

on February 03, 2012
at 10:38 PM

Think of digestive enzymes like laundry detergent. They don't get recycled, they get used up, and when you run a new load (eat another meal) your body puts in more. Whether your last load got totally clean or not doesn't affect the next load. -- As I mentioned, this may be an oversimplification, because there may be long-term effects of incomplete digestion, like SIBO...but I can't think of any direct effect by which trypsin inhibitors inhibit future trypsin production. (If I'm wrong, please feel free to correct me.)

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