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Macadamia Nuts: Raw vs Roasted. Does it Make a Difference for Heart Health?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created September 04, 2012 at 6:13 PM

In terms of boosting HDL cholesterol and protecting the heart, are there any differences between raw macadamias and roasted? Are the monounsaturated fats damaged by the roasting process? Also, macadamia's contain saturated fats - anyone know kind of saturate fats they are (good kind vs. bad kind)?

Af1d286f0fd5c3949f59b4edf4d892f5

(18452)

on September 09, 2012
at 03:53 PM

monos tolerate high heat too, and you're right about commercially roasted nuts. there is a brand called mauna loa that does not use veggie oil.

543a65b3004bf5a51974fbdd60d666bb

(4493)

on September 08, 2012
at 02:52 AM

by all accounts the phytic acid content in macadamia nuts is "very low", but i have been unable to find any actual data. some refs http://paleohacks.com/questions/127664/phytic-acid-in-macadamias & http://paleodietlifestyle.com/are-nuts-and-seeds-healthy/ .Chestnuts are "very low" in phytic acid as well

Bb3d1772b28c02da2426e40dfcb533f5

(5381)

on September 08, 2012
at 02:52 AM

^ mostly right IMO, monos to tolerate slow heat, but commercially roasted nuts are often roasted in vege oils, sadly.

194d8e8140425057fe06202e1e5822a7

(3979)

on September 07, 2012
at 01:00 PM

From Wikipedia: "Phytic acid is found within the hulls of nuts, seeds, and grains.[2] In-home food preparation techniques can reduce the phytic acid in all of these foods. Simply cooking the food will reduce the phytic acid to some degree. More effective methods are soaking in an acid medium, lactic acid fermentation, and sprouting.[17]"

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3 Answers

2
Af1d286f0fd5c3949f59b4edf4d892f5

(18452)

on September 07, 2012
at 02:12 PM

The quick answer is "No, it does not really make a difference".

A short expansion on why not.. is that mac nut fat is about 80-85% monounsaturated and about 10-15% saturated. With less than 5% room in there for poly, there is very little to damage with heat, as the bulk of the nut fat is very stable in high heat.

Taking that logic a step further, you can see why macadamia nut oil is a great cooking oil, and just a great oil in general.

I prefer them raw for taste and creamy texture. If they are roasted, I prefer them with no salt. But anyway that wasn't part of the question. That was just a free nugget right there.

Bb3d1772b28c02da2426e40dfcb533f5

(5381)

on September 08, 2012
at 02:52 AM

^ mostly right IMO, monos to tolerate slow heat, but commercially roasted nuts are often roasted in vege oils, sadly.

Af1d286f0fd5c3949f59b4edf4d892f5

(18452)

on September 09, 2012
at 03:53 PM

monos tolerate high heat too, and you're right about commercially roasted nuts. there is a brand called mauna loa that does not use veggie oil.

1
05de181d71c1df6304a03566fe821d4b

on September 07, 2012
at 06:53 AM

Well I am not sure about the HDL stuff, but nuts contain phytic acid (I personally choose not to eat any nuts because of this) but I guess it is "ok" to eat it as long as you don't eat it with some mineral rich food as phytic acid binds to minerals making them unavailable for abortion. I can't pull up the site by in google type: "westonprice soaking nuts" But mac nuts are one of the lowest one in phytic acid so you may be able to bypass the soaking. But I am obsessive so, I just stay away from nuts all together :)

Macadamia are also not that high in saturated fats I think monounsaturated makes up most of the fat for them. There are good saturated fats , coconut oil (raw cold pressed) Grass fed animal tallow, grass fed/pastured raw butter. Saturated fats are bad when they are artificially saturated (soy/canola/vegetable oil) Also as far as cooking I would recommend sticking to Grass Fed tallow, coconut oil as they stay stable at higher temperatures, I wouldn't really use olive oil to cook because it is a medium heat oil, and some people tend to use to sautee on high temperature making the fats rancid. Also if weight loss is concerned I would stick to butter and coconut oil since butter is a short chain triglyceride, and coconut oil being a medium chain triglyceride your body will use this as energy. Olive Oil being a long chain triglyceride your body may or may not store depending on the level of fat in your diet (but do use some just don't go crazy) Combine this with low carb paleo to may help get your triglycerides/cholesterol in check (if that is a concern). So maybe the majority of your carbs will come only form above ground leafy fibrous green veggies. Also maybe with some protein restriction (your body can convert protein to glucose through gluconeogenesis) You can calculate your need of protein 0.8g per kg of body weight, try to stay under 25g of protein per meal. So if you go the low carb route just increase the fat so you aren't starving. eat enough fat with your meals so that you are satiated.

Read "Primal Body Primal Mind" By Nora Gedgaudes, I really liked that book, I also read "The Paleo Diet" - Dr. Cordain, "The Paleo Solution" - Robb Wolf. All good books Nora's my favorite.

Good Luck! :D

543a65b3004bf5a51974fbdd60d666bb

(4493)

on September 08, 2012
at 02:52 AM

by all accounts the phytic acid content in macadamia nuts is "very low", but i have been unable to find any actual data. some refs http://paleohacks.com/questions/127664/phytic-acid-in-macadamias & http://paleodietlifestyle.com/are-nuts-and-seeds-healthy/ .Chestnuts are "very low" in phytic acid as well

194d8e8140425057fe06202e1e5822a7

(3979)

on September 07, 2012
at 01:00 PM

From Wikipedia: "Phytic acid is found within the hulls of nuts, seeds, and grains.[2] In-home food preparation techniques can reduce the phytic acid in all of these foods. Simply cooking the food will reduce the phytic acid to some degree. More effective methods are soaking in an acid medium, lactic acid fermentation, and sprouting.[17]"

0
782d92f4127823bdfb2ddfcbcf961d0e

on September 04, 2012
at 07:04 PM

Well, among nuts, macadamias are the lowest in omega-6's which makes them pretty heart healthy. As far as roasting them it depends on how they are roasted. In oil, then not so good. They can be dry roasted so the nutritional effect would probably be little changed from eating them raw. You can buy them raw and roast them in your oven yourself. I prefer them raw (but I could be just too lazy to roast them myself).

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