1

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Anti-nutrients in beans and nuts

Answered on September 12, 2014
Created March 13, 2012 at 9:42 AM

Just a thought, and wanted to start a discussion about it. Not asking for any particular reason. What's worse eating nuts or beans? Don't they both contain phytates?

7dc950fc76a046048e683d2a27dced37

on March 13, 2012
at 04:18 PM

If you view the presentation I linked you don't see Robb painting us all as being completely helpless. He explains the mechanism and suggests that folks experiment to see how it affects them.

7dc950fc76a046048e683d2a27dced37

on March 13, 2012
at 04:10 PM

I think if you view the presentation you don't see Robb painting us all as being completely helpless. He explains the mechanism and suggests that folks experiment to see how it affects them.

32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41757)

on March 13, 2012
at 03:19 PM

True, but in the end it's all how we all individually react to X Y or Z. Just as there's a spectrum of gluten tolerance, there's a spectrum for bean proteins as well. Robb likes to paint us all as being completely helpless when it comes to wheat and legume proteins, but that's not really the case. Maybe in the paleo realm, because that's where folks with these problems tend to end up.

35ba1f50dad25c85ac1aa2599fe5c5cb

(2485)

on March 13, 2012
at 02:48 PM

If you tend to overeat nuts I would be extremely cautious with brazil nuts. They contain high amounts of radium (for a food).

7dc950fc76a046048e683d2a27dced37

on March 13, 2012
at 01:39 PM

Robb's point was that it does not look like lectins are the problematic protein as far as leaky gut goes.

32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41757)

on March 13, 2012
at 01:34 PM

May be inactivated. Depends on the lectin really.

7dc950fc76a046048e683d2a27dced37

on March 13, 2012
at 01:23 PM

Actually, Robb points out it isn't the lectins, as they are inactivated by cooking. The culprits look to be the prolamins in grains and the globulins in legumes. Properly prepared legumes (soaked, sprouted, fermented) may be less problematic, but the question was about nuts vs beans. I'd choose nuts.

32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41757)

on March 13, 2012
at 12:56 PM

Oh noes, the lectins!

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3 Answers

5
A968087cc1dd66d480749c02e4619ef4

(20436)

on March 13, 2012
at 10:42 AM

Most beans are worse than most nuts but not because of phytates or n6 content. It's other things like raffinose (the bean sugar that makes you fart) in kidney beans, phytoestrogens in soy, the mold (aflatoxin) in peanuts that are really bad. I think beans should be evaluated case by case - as should nuts. Lentils and chickpeas don't seem too bad, but you may or may not want to include them. I eat them on rare occasions without problems (that I'm aware of). Walnuts are supposed to be a superfood according to the MSM (for the n3 content, mostly) but they have 10 times the n6! Again, I eat nuts several times per week (usually almonds) in small quantities. Macademias have little PUFA (mostly MUFA) and can be eaten at will - assuming you can afford to.

And, as Melissa (The Melissa) has so frequently pointed out, all plants contain some phytate. I wouldn't make food choices based on phytic acid content. The real problem with wheat is the gluten proteins and the lack of nutrients, especially when refined.

1
7d64d3988de1b0e493aacf37843c5596

(2861)

on March 13, 2012
at 01:53 PM

I eat Brazil nuts for the selenium, but in general I would go for beans over nuts because I tend to overeat nuts.

Phytates, lectins, and all that kind of stuff is just pure speculation ??? just attempts to explain maybe why a Paleolithic diet without beans and grains might be healthier. It might be totally unrelated though. It might be that if these foods are not significantly displacing other nutritious foods in your diet they might not be that big of a deal. Maybe as Melissa suggested that storage itself causes problems on its own (microbial contamination, rancidity, etc???).

Peanuts and soy and maybe wheat seem to have their own unique problems, so I do limit these as well as crap-in-a-box grain products.

35ba1f50dad25c85ac1aa2599fe5c5cb

(2485)

on March 13, 2012
at 02:48 PM

If you tend to overeat nuts I would be extremely cautious with brazil nuts. They contain high amounts of radium (for a food).

1
7dc950fc76a046048e683d2a27dced37

on March 13, 2012
at 11:52 AM

The bigger problem is the proteins in legumes and grains. Mat Lalonde is doing his AHS12 talk on this topic, but Robb Wolf discusses the role of these undigestible proteins in leaky gut and autoimmune in this fab talk.

32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41757)

on March 13, 2012
at 01:34 PM

May be inactivated. Depends on the lectin really.

7dc950fc76a046048e683d2a27dced37

on March 13, 2012
at 01:23 PM

Actually, Robb points out it isn't the lectins, as they are inactivated by cooking. The culprits look to be the prolamins in grains and the globulins in legumes. Properly prepared legumes (soaked, sprouted, fermented) may be less problematic, but the question was about nuts vs beans. I'd choose nuts.

7dc950fc76a046048e683d2a27dced37

on March 13, 2012
at 01:39 PM

Robb's point was that it does not look like lectins are the problematic protein as far as leaky gut goes.

32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41757)

on March 13, 2012
at 12:56 PM

Oh noes, the lectins!

32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41757)

on March 13, 2012
at 03:19 PM

True, but in the end it's all how we all individually react to X Y or Z. Just as there's a spectrum of gluten tolerance, there's a spectrum for bean proteins as well. Robb likes to paint us all as being completely helpless when it comes to wheat and legume proteins, but that's not really the case. Maybe in the paleo realm, because that's where folks with these problems tend to end up.

7dc950fc76a046048e683d2a27dced37

on March 13, 2012
at 04:18 PM

If you view the presentation I linked you don't see Robb painting us all as being completely helpless. He explains the mechanism and suggests that folks experiment to see how it affects them.

7dc950fc76a046048e683d2a27dced37

on March 13, 2012
at 04:10 PM

I think if you view the presentation you don't see Robb painting us all as being completely helpless. He explains the mechanism and suggests that folks experiment to see how it affects them.

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