1

votes

Vegetable or Not?

Answered on September 12, 2014
Created July 13, 2011 at 6:33 AM

Recently I asked a question about what veggies to eat with breakfast??? and a lot of people said tomatoes and mushrooms, neither of which are vegetables, and that got me thinking???

I eat them because I want to make up for nutritional gaps, things I don't get from meat, especially because I don't eat offal of any kind??? sorry muscle and poultry skin only. No marrow stews, broiled liver, or brain salads for me.

So for the purposes of nutritional delivery what is and isn't a vegetable? What common "vegetables" wouldn't you consider a good choice for a vegetable at a meal when looking to balance the nutritional deficiencies of CAFO beef or chicken (including things like squash, mushrooms, and tomatoes).

9e975c86f483555ed19e59c5628488ca

(823)

on July 15, 2011
at 07:08 AM

The not eating bone broths isn't due to them being repulsive it's that for whatever reason it's insanely expensive here. You can buy a lot of veggies or if you like a lot of pills for the cost of even a small chunk of marrow in bone.

9e975c86f483555ed19e59c5628488ca

(823)

on July 15, 2011
at 07:04 AM

I think we can include seaweed and kelp. Leafy greens of the sea.

9e975c86f483555ed19e59c5628488ca

(823)

on July 15, 2011
at 07:03 AM

It's a worthwhile discussion, some people will never eat offal because it's too unusual or prohibited by a religion, or even that it's not easily available.

9e975c86f483555ed19e59c5628488ca

(823)

on July 15, 2011
at 07:01 AM

Oh I wouldn't expect plants to make up for the skewed Omega ratios, but there are other nutritional reasons to eat veggies. The micro-nutrient profile of naturally fed animals of course is going to be better, however the price around here is double to triple and thus it's not really an option. We do some supplementation to mitigate this already.

9e975c86f483555ed19e59c5628488ca

(823)

on July 15, 2011
at 06:55 AM

Rhubarb, yes… yes it did.

9e975c86f483555ed19e59c5628488ca

(823)

on July 15, 2011
at 06:55 AM

Wozza, meat itself isn't inherently lacking, especially if you eat diverse meat, including organ meat and animals that are the sort of things they're supposed to eat. However we primarily eat beef, and primarily beef which is grain fed

9e975c86f483555ed19e59c5628488ca

(823)

on July 15, 2011
at 06:54 AM

Wozza, meat itself isn't inherently lacking, especially if you eat diverse meat, including organ meat and animals that are the sort of things they're supposed to eat. However we primarily eat beef, and primarily beef which is grain fed Rhubarb, yes… yes it did.

C2502365891cbcc8af2d1cf1d7b0e9fc

(2437)

on July 14, 2011
at 07:32 AM

What are meat's nutritional gaps?

345c1755efe005edd162b770dc6fb821

(8767)

on July 13, 2011
at 07:33 PM

Ben and I are in super sync mode!

C3edabc6267abec9b5f8178e5d73552c

(725)

on July 13, 2011
at 03:30 PM

agreed.. green leafys are the best. Purslane ftw

667f6c030b0245d71d8ef50c72b097dc

(15976)

on July 13, 2011
at 12:56 PM

there you go - our timing never ceases to impress;)

Cc93847bfa820f0f2da654060b401fa5

(746)

on July 13, 2011
at 08:47 AM

All of them and more of whichever ones you like most :) Pretty hard to go wrong with some sauteed greens. Beat tops and spinach are my faves.

279700a1070c65fc144eceaa642dcbc7

(144)

on July 13, 2011
at 08:16 AM

Vegetable isn't a botanically defined term - fruit is. Stuff like tomatoes are fruits and vegetables at the same time.

B3e7d1ab5aeb329fe24cca1de1a0b09c

(5242)

on July 13, 2011
at 06:58 AM

Did your auto correct or spell checker screw up and replace vegetable with veritable? Because that sentence makes no sense :)

  • 9e975c86f483555ed19e59c5628488ca

    asked by

    (823)
  • Views
    1.9K
  • Last Activity
    1256D AGO
Frontpage book

Get FREE instant access to our Paleo For Beginners Guide & 15 FREE Recipes!

6 Answers

3
667f6c030b0245d71d8ef50c72b097dc

(15976)

on July 13, 2011
at 12:56 PM

In your bold sentence I think you meant to write ???would??? rather than ???wouldn???t???.

Green leafy veg is usually pretty dense nutritionally. Classics are spinach, kale, collared, etc. Dark colored anything usually has a good hit of various stuff. Sweet Potatoes have a lot of good stuff, too.

In the end just rotate through different vegetables. I???d say, don???t overthink it. Just vary it up and you???ll be fine.

C3edabc6267abec9b5f8178e5d73552c

(725)

on July 13, 2011
at 03:30 PM

agreed.. green leafys are the best. Purslane ftw

2
B3e7d1ab5aeb329fe24cca1de1a0b09c

(5242)

on July 13, 2011
at 07:37 AM

Generally speaking a vegetable is the 'flesh' of a plant, such as sweet potato or broccoli, whilst a fruit is part of the plants reproductive system, for instance, your seed containing tomato.

I can't really think of a bad vegetable, unless you're avoiding starchy vegetables for carb restriction purposes. Same goes for fruit - they're all good unless you're avoiding fructose or carbs - and then it is all about the dose, obviously.

Best to eat a wide variety of all shapes and colours to maximise the amount of nutrients you consume.

If you're trying to use vegetables/fruits (plants) as a crutch for the nutrients you miss out on by not consuming organ meat, bone broths, etc, you're going to struggle, particularly if not consuming grass fed muscle meat/fat.

  • You're not going to be able to balance the poor omgea 3/6 ratio of CAFO meat with vegetables.
  • Vegetables are poor choices for fat soluble vitamins such as A, D, K2. Though you can make up for K2 with pastured diary and D with fatty fish and eggs, and small amounts in most meats - oh and sun :)

Point being there are many nutrients that you must get from the animal, as they aren't present in plant - or present in a poorly bioavailable way, such as vitamin A in vegetables, is in the form of betacarotene which the body must convert to retinol, which it does so poorly.

My advice is make bone broths (stock) and use them in soups - trust me they are delicous, and if you only eat one organ meat, eat liver - it is a true 'super food'. Just learn recipe(s) where you can't taste it. There is a bunch floating around that uses liver with ground beef as meat balls, hamburgers, etc.

Best of luck.

9e975c86f483555ed19e59c5628488ca

(823)

on July 15, 2011
at 07:01 AM

Oh I wouldn't expect plants to make up for the skewed Omega ratios, but there are other nutritional reasons to eat veggies. The micro-nutrient profile of naturally fed animals of course is going to be better, however the price around here is double to triple and thus it's not really an option. We do some supplementation to mitigate this already.

9e975c86f483555ed19e59c5628488ca

(823)

on July 15, 2011
at 07:03 AM

It's a worthwhile discussion, some people will never eat offal because it's too unusual or prohibited by a religion, or even that it's not easily available.

1
44348571d9bc70c02ac2975cc500f154

(5853)

on July 13, 2011
at 08:36 PM

Fish and seaweed, salmon is my pork, i cook it many times for breakfast. I need to include seaweed to my daily stable as well. For stocks (kombu) and salads (wakame etc).I need to ask at my fish market if they can reserve salmon livers for me. I imagine they are quite perfect food :)

1
100fd85230060e754fc13394eee6d6f1

(18696)

on July 13, 2011
at 01:41 PM

It would be helpful to know what deficiencies in meat you are trying to address.

Chris Kresser posted a nice table a while back that compares muscle meat and liver to apples and carrots, noting that except for vitamin C, even muscle meat surpasses those particular two for every nutrient. So I guess don't bother choosing apples or carrots for this purpose, unless you are specifically after vitamin C.

I have another suggestion that is technically not a vegetable: seaweed. It depends on the variety, of course, but they tend to have a lot of minerals, including iodine, many of which in meat (and vegetables for that matter) tend to be dependent on soil quality, so could be easy to miss out on, especially if you're not brothing.

ETA: And don't forget eggs. They are in many cases between meat and liver for nutrient density. For example they are an excellent source of vitamin A without being so high as to require caution, which liver can be.

9e975c86f483555ed19e59c5628488ca

(823)

on July 15, 2011
at 07:04 AM

I think we can include seaweed and kelp. Leafy greens of the sea.

0
B14dc4aa1ddefbec3bc09550428ee493

on July 14, 2011
at 07:26 AM

I would be hesitant to give you a list because I don't know what you like first of all and secondly you need a variety if want to make up any nutritional gaps. I would say eat a rainbow of different colored fruits and vegetables and you should be fine. Each different colored food is high in a different nutrient.

0
345c1755efe005edd162b770dc6fb821

(8767)

on July 13, 2011
at 12:55 PM

I would suggest eating a variety of vegetables at all meals, and when you seem to be craving something in particular, eat that!

Bone broths as suggested by Rhubarb are probably one of the best ops as well. Variety of foods in general in both proteins and carbs should do the trick if you are a generally healthy person.

667f6c030b0245d71d8ef50c72b097dc

(15976)

on July 13, 2011
at 12:56 PM

there you go - our timing never ceases to impress;)

345c1755efe005edd162b770dc6fb821

(8767)

on July 13, 2011
at 07:33 PM

Ben and I are in super sync mode!

9e975c86f483555ed19e59c5628488ca

(823)

on July 15, 2011
at 07:08 AM

The not eating bone broths isn't due to them being repulsive it's that for whatever reason it's insanely expensive here. You can buy a lot of veggies or if you like a lot of pills for the cost of even a small chunk of marrow in bone.

Answer Question


Get FREE instant access to our
Paleo For Beginners Guide & 15 FREE Recipes!