1

votes

OK to boil kale + carrots if I use the remaining water? Is it still nutritious ???

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created March 01, 2013 at 4:51 PM

I cooked 2 cups of Kale and 4 medium carrots (peeled+chopped) in 2 cups of water for about 15 minutes.

I dumped the remaining water and veggies into my vitamix (fancy blender), along with raw milk to make a green smoothie.

The cooked veggies resulted in a much smoother smoothie consistency. When I tried raw veggies, though blended, it felt gritty.

QUESTIONS:


By using the remaining water, did I recover any of the minerals which boiled out of the veggies? Is only pure water boiled off?

How did veggie-boiling and using the recovered liquid affect the total nutrition?

Does cooking harm nutrition or liberate it?

Thanks, Mike

Eed7dabde3d61910685845e04605267f

(2934)

on March 02, 2013
at 05:44 AM

@Mscott - right you are, my mistake - I was aligning with spinach... http://lowoxalateinfo.com/is-kale-low-oxalate/ Mike- I wouldn't be concerned unless you had kidney or digestive issues, in which case assimilation of nutrients could be compromised, amongst other things (stones). As kale is not high in oxalates anyway as Mscott said, I can't see where you'd have problems.

A2c38be4c54c91a15071f82f14cac0b3

(12682)

on March 02, 2013
at 04:09 AM

Kale is low in oxalates, so probably not anything to worry about.

7fc82eebafd44badc73c520f44660150

(3275)

on March 02, 2013
at 04:02 AM

I have no issues with stones. If I have 3 cups (6oz) of Kale daily, should I be concerned?

A2c38be4c54c91a15071f82f14cac0b3

(12682)

on March 01, 2013
at 06:37 PM

Boiling results in significant loses of beta carotene and, generally, most nutrients. Boiling increases your ability to absorb a number of these nutrients, but this is a product of cooking rather than boiling specifically.

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2 Answers

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Eed7dabde3d61910685845e04605267f

on March 02, 2013
at 03:47 AM

You will recover the minerals but also the oxalates from the kale... [edit] as Mscott says below kale isn't particularly high in oxalates, so this shouldn't be a problem.

To say something more that might be more helpful - my understanding is that boiling will liberate sugars (eg in carrots) and displace them into the water. This is why liquids of stews that have vegetables can be tasty, while the solids can be less so (in certain preparations). Of the nutrients that aren't degraded/destroyed by the cooking processes, some of them will probably be in the water too. The fibre stays in the solid.

I daresay the heat used (eg hard rolling boil vs simmer has an effect too - rolling boil raises the GI/GL relatively to gentler cooking. The GI/GL can be fairly useless a concept though in context of overall diet, mixed meals etc..

A2c38be4c54c91a15071f82f14cac0b3

(12682)

on March 02, 2013
at 04:09 AM

Kale is low in oxalates, so probably not anything to worry about.

Eed7dabde3d61910685845e04605267f

(2934)

on March 02, 2013
at 05:44 AM

@Mscott - right you are, my mistake - I was aligning with spinach... http://lowoxalateinfo.com/is-kale-low-oxalate/ Mike- I wouldn't be concerned unless you had kidney or digestive issues, in which case assimilation of nutrients could be compromised, amongst other things (stones). As kale is not high in oxalates anyway as Mscott said, I can't see where you'd have problems.

7fc82eebafd44badc73c520f44660150

(3275)

on March 02, 2013
at 04:02 AM

I have no issues with stones. If I have 3 cups (6oz) of Kale daily, should I be concerned?

0
D8612a7c536e74f9855b70d8e97919b5

(1042)

on March 01, 2013
at 05:48 PM

Boiling reduces some nutrients and enchances the absorption of other by breaking down the cell walls. For example, vitamin C is reduced while vitamin A (beta-carotene) absorption is enchanced in boiled foods.

The boiling water does retain some of the nutrients that are leached out of the veggies. In the South, the liquid that greens are cooked in is called pot likker/liquor. It's traditionally sopped up with cornbread, but I just drink some of it plain.

http://whfoods.org/genpage.php?tname=george&dbid=61

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Collard_liquor

A2c38be4c54c91a15071f82f14cac0b3

(12682)

on March 01, 2013
at 06:37 PM

Boiling results in significant loses of beta carotene and, generally, most nutrients. Boiling increases your ability to absorb a number of these nutrients, but this is a product of cooking rather than boiling specifically.

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