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Nutritional implications of dry aging beef

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created July 13, 2012 at 9:22 PM

Anyone have details on any nutritional or health implications of dry aging beef?

I imagine that dry aging was not something done by hunter-gatherer societies: Either eat it fresh, cook it, or do some sort of preservation. That said, dry aging improves beef flavor and texture, and I am having a half cow dry aged for 3 weeks for me, and I wanted to see if anyone knew of any science on the health/nutrition effects of this processing.

Thanks.

510bdda8988ed0d4b0ec0b738b4edb73

(20888)

on July 15, 2012
at 03:43 AM

Well, I would assume that since the meat doesn't spoil as fast as if you just leave it out on the table that it's being preserved. It's probably not the same as freezing, salting, etc, but it's still preserving it.

3e50edec642d6b3ed1dec90c7b91a25c

(75)

on July 15, 2012
at 02:43 AM

Jerky, yes; dry aging, doubtful. Without carefully controlled temperature and humidity, the meat would spoil. Do you have anything to backup the claim that "dry aging" is a form of preservation?

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3 Answers

4
E8bf28bd28f5be7c34d4a1a97e7c1353

(253)

on July 13, 2012
at 09:42 PM

The longer meat is aged, the greater the histamine and other biogenic amine content. Not an issue for some, but a big one for those who are histamine/amine sensitive (like myself).

4
510bdda8988ed0d4b0ec0b738b4edb73

(20888)

on July 13, 2012
at 09:25 PM

what do you think that "some sort of preservation" was? They didn't have freezers or likely tons of salt. Probably their only choices were jerky and dry aging.

510bdda8988ed0d4b0ec0b738b4edb73

(20888)

on July 15, 2012
at 03:43 AM

Well, I would assume that since the meat doesn't spoil as fast as if you just leave it out on the table that it's being preserved. It's probably not the same as freezing, salting, etc, but it's still preserving it.

3e50edec642d6b3ed1dec90c7b91a25c

(75)

on July 15, 2012
at 02:43 AM

Jerky, yes; dry aging, doubtful. Without carefully controlled temperature and humidity, the meat would spoil. Do you have anything to backup the claim that "dry aging" is a form of preservation?

0
9a5e2da94ad63ea3186dfa494e16a8d1

on July 14, 2012
at 02:52 AM

Actually I would think that dry aging was one of the first forms of meat preservation. It probably didn't take them long to figure out that taking the blood out and hanging it was a good way to keep it edible for a few weeks.

Dry aging basically takes some of the water out, which decreases the likelihood of spoilage, and the time spent aging increases enzyme activity which starts to break down or "pre-digest" the meat, as long as it isn't spoiling. These are probably all good things for our health.

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