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Majoring in Nutrition

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created December 10, 2012 at 6:35 PM

I was just wondering if someone can give me a path to becoming a nutritionist and the different things one can become from there. Just any wisdom in general would help.

4b5be253ac1981c690689cab7e4bf06d

(3043)

on December 11, 2012
at 02:59 AM

Also, the "dietetics" degree is sponsored by Industry, so you will have to follow the "conventional wisdom to get that degree.

3ce6a0d24be025e2f2af534545bdd1d7

(26217)

on December 11, 2012
at 01:34 AM

agreed, a PhD is beneficial for the research side of the field.

F02990386b12528111740ad6279ba29d

(1363)

on December 11, 2012
at 12:58 AM

Had a guy tell me the other day I was crazy for eating bacon more than once a week... his credentials: "I majored in nutrition" Have fun.

43f469552cfd3be73fc88a9821b14986

on December 10, 2012
at 10:52 PM

A PhD in nutrition is not necessarily a Registered Dietitian who is allowed to make nutritional decisions and recommendations.

64433a05384cd9717c1aa6bf7e98b661

(15236)

on December 10, 2012
at 06:58 PM

Are you in the US?

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3 Answers

1
3ce6a0d24be025e2f2af534545bdd1d7

(26217)

on December 10, 2012
at 07:35 PM

Note this is an answer for US based

If you are looking to get into the research side of the field, then you probably want to get a degree in Nutritional Sciences. I would recommend a bio-chem undergrad and a Nutritional sciences masters and/or PHD.

If you are looking to become a nutritionist/ dietician, then you need a degree in Dietetics. Typically a bachelors is all that is required. Then you need to become certified/ registered dietitian within the state you are going to work in. Dietetics are much like Lawyers where the local municipality regulates and certifies professionals. Whereas some careers have a national regulator.

43f469552cfd3be73fc88a9821b14986

on December 10, 2012
at 10:52 PM

A PhD in nutrition is not necessarily a Registered Dietitian who is allowed to make nutritional decisions and recommendations.

4b5be253ac1981c690689cab7e4bf06d

(3043)

on December 11, 2012
at 02:59 AM

Also, the "dietetics" degree is sponsored by Industry, so you will have to follow the "conventional wisdom to get that degree.

3ce6a0d24be025e2f2af534545bdd1d7

(26217)

on December 11, 2012
at 01:34 AM

agreed, a PhD is beneficial for the research side of the field.

0
23d34842642ceb5996949f4a68afb585

on December 10, 2012
at 11:07 PM

The career of "nutritional therapist" sounds interesting. It would be cool to do what Lucy Jones the dietician from the UK series "The Food Hospital" does - including working alongside an openminded, clued-up, doctor and surgeon in that sort of a shared practice type scenario.

I highly recommend checking out the series if you're interested in the field. (They basically cured a little boy's epilepsy by putting him on a ketogenic diet for example. The change in food reduced him from an avg. of 15 or so drop attacks a day, to nil!) Interning with her or someone similar (once you'd earned the requisite qualification/s suggested in other answers) would be pretty neat I imagine.

As Hippocrates said:"Let food be thy medicine and medicine be thy food." It's certainly a good first port of call.

All the best on your path to helping people heal themselves.

0
A4e6473c7791ca1ddeedf5c5db5fbe14

on December 10, 2012
at 10:39 PM

Like CD said, go for Dietetics. That'll give you some credibility in the nutrition field. It takes a bachelor's in a Dietetics/Nutrition program that's accredited by ACEND, and then you usually have to do a dietetic internship afterwards. The internship is usually anywhere from 6-12 months, and the application process is super competitive. I think the national average is around 50%. Other options for the internship are coordinated programs (if the school you go to offers this - also very competitive), distance internships, ISPP's (which are kind of new and I don't really understand them, but basically you're allowed to apply for it if you've already applied to a regular internship and haven't gotten in), and combined internship/master's degree programs. I think there's another one, but I can't think of it off the top of my head. Most people just try to get a regular internship. After you've completed that, then you qualify to take the Dietitian exam. Then you get certifications and all that by your state. Hope this helps. I just thought I should say something, since I didn't realize all of the stuff that comes after the bachelor's until I was already in the major. I'm in the internship application stuff now, it's insane.

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