3

votes

Specific benefits of eating muscle meat?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created May 12, 2013 at 7:53 PM

Are there specific benefits to eating muscle meat from land animals (e.g, chicken, beef, pork)? Their fat is a good source of saturated fatty acids and fat-soluble vitamins; their bones and cartilage are full of minerals and other healthy substances; and their liver has so many vitamins it's almost hard to believe. But what about the actual meat? I know it's a source of high-quality protein and a good way to get calories without many obvious drawbacks, but are there specifically desirable things about it?

Let's say someone rarely ate "meat," but had a couple of servings per day of fatty organ meat, bone broth, pickled feet, etc. Otherwise they got their protein and fat from dairy, eggs, and fish. Do you think they'd be missing out on anything nutritionally? Are there any concerns you'd have about their diet?

Extra question: What if they got their omega-3s from fish oil* and didn't eat any animal muscle at all? Would that change your answer?

* Or if you're anti-supplement, let's say that they're eating buckets of krill.

72cf727474b8bf815fdc505e58cadfea

on May 12, 2013
at 09:16 PM

Okay, that sounds completely separate from what you mentioned above. In any case, I'm not talking about eating offal as a major source of calories, but rather an appropriate quantity for its nutritional benefits. My question was misleadingly vague about that, mostly because I didn't want to list an amount that was too small and have people's responses focus on that.

32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41757)

on May 12, 2013
at 09:06 PM

It's still wasteful, you end up - literally - pissing away most of the vitamins and nutrients. It's the same problem I have with folks who consume protein far in excess of what is needed for nitrogen balance, it's just pissing away valuable nutrients.

72cf727474b8bf815fdc505e58cadfea

on May 12, 2013
at 08:41 PM

I still think it's fair both as a theoretical question and as a question localized to the current dietary / economic environment, where offal is likely to be cheaper than muscle meat for a while to come.

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3 Answers

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Ebb10603524dd22621c1155dd7ddf106

(19150)

on May 12, 2013
at 08:09 PM

Mostly regarding beef and other ruminants, muscle meat contains creatine and taurine in abundance - though both diminish as meat nears well done -- so don't cook it that long.

I don't think an offal-pescetarian is missing anything, frankly. If you're eating fish and animal organs, you're eating meat, no need to mince the definitions -- fish is definitely meat. Fish and seafood tend to have a BV% that's similar to beef, too.

4
32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41757)

on May 12, 2013
at 08:36 PM

Offal is not meant to be a dietary staple. A cow has but one liver, but 100s of pounds of muscle meat. It would be inefficient and wasteful to subsist on offal alone.

32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41757)

on May 12, 2013
at 09:06 PM

It's still wasteful, you end up - literally - pissing away most of the vitamins and nutrients. It's the same problem I have with folks who consume protein far in excess of what is needed for nitrogen balance, it's just pissing away valuable nutrients.

72cf727474b8bf815fdc505e58cadfea

on May 12, 2013
at 08:41 PM

I still think it's fair both as a theoretical question and as a question localized to the current dietary / economic environment, where offal is likely to be cheaper than muscle meat for a while to come.

72cf727474b8bf815fdc505e58cadfea

on May 12, 2013
at 09:16 PM

Okay, that sounds completely separate from what you mentioned above. In any case, I'm not talking about eating offal as a major source of calories, but rather an appropriate quantity for its nutritional benefits. My question was misleadingly vague about that, mostly because I didn't want to list an amount that was too small and have people's responses focus on that.

3
Cb9a270955e2c277a02c4a4b5dad10b5

(10989)

on May 13, 2013
at 02:13 AM

I'd be concerned they were getting inadequate zinc and taurine, maybe creatine, and then maybe selenium and heme-iron. If someone ate o3 supplements and no animal meat at all, I probably wouldn't even address it. Their diet is so whack I wouldn't know where to begin..

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