5

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How do you get dietary iodine?

Commented on September 26, 2014
Created February 15, 2010 at 7:28 PM

Iodine is important for thyroid health. Paleolithic humans had to have ingested it somehow, and geographic limitations probably affected their methods. How would a modern person attempt to maintain appropriate iodine levels in a natural manner?

Along with the accepted answer belong, I'm going to link to a table in Yahoo Health Groups: http://iodine4health.com/research/iodine_in_food_table.htm

03a8a07e68d5b9713bd2912043d006b9

(0)

on September 26, 2014
at 03:37 PM

I was recently told that my TSH test shows I am slightly Hyperthyroidism.  I have been on a Plaeo diet for almost 2 years.  Is there anything you might suggest that I should add or decrease in the diet.

Be1dbd31e4a3fccd4394494aa5db256d

(17969)

on April 20, 2011
at 12:59 AM

www.swansonvitamins.com for Lugol's.

5e36f73c3f95eb4ea13a009f4936449f

(8280)

on April 20, 2011
at 12:43 AM

Lugols is a bit hard to find after the Japan rush (people were freaking out on getting iodine). I imagine it'll be back and more available in the coming months.

E35e3d76547b18096a59c90029e7e107

(15613)

on February 16, 2010
at 07:36 PM

@archaea Np, your point about the thymus atrophying down to just fat in adults is quite important to me too- makes me think I should go only for lamb thymus (all I've had so far) because they'll be younger and more active, I assume. @ Durandal. Right you are then, Dr Davis is not infallible. Do you know how much foods would lose iodine from other mechanisms, i.e. sitting on the shelf, exposed to heat in cooking or being lost into cooking water.

70d9359a2086e890a4c3bccb2ba8a8cb

(2254)

on February 16, 2010
at 06:44 PM

@David Moss: thanks for the reference! Sounds interesting, and it's spurred me to look for more information on iodine's role in the body. Might have a go at trying sweetbreads as well.

60b0d3e60670f645cca59f67710b4820

(399)

on February 15, 2010
at 10:18 PM

Iodized salt is either supplemented with iodide or iodate salts, neither of which is volatile.

E35e3d76547b18096a59c90029e7e107

(15613)

on February 15, 2010
at 09:04 PM

@ Arhcaea. Yes I did mean thymus http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19647627 @ Durandal Thanks. I'd gotten the impression from Dr Davis that that all sources of iodine would lose it rapidly ("Salt that sits on the shelf for more than a month is devoid of iodine, given iodine's volatility"), but on rereading I see that it's possible to interpret that as only applying to iodine added to salt. http://heartscanblog.blogspot.com/2009/06/what-kind-of-iodine-do-you-take.html

60b0d3e60670f645cca59f67710b4820

(399)

on February 15, 2010
at 08:45 PM

Iodide is not volatile, only molecular iodine is.

70d9359a2086e890a4c3bccb2ba8a8cb

(2254)

on February 15, 2010
at 08:36 PM

Is iodine stored in the thymus in humans, or did you mean thyroid? Genuinely asking because they're not the same organ, and I knew about iodine storage in the thyroid (and the fundamental role it plays in its function), but never heard of it being associated with the thymus (which is usually very atrophic and inactive in adults).

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3 Answers

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E35e3d76547b18096a59c90029e7e107

(15613)

on February 15, 2010
at 07:49 PM

Seaweeds are ostensibly the easiest most, natural way to get iodine. The figures seem to vary substantially though, some say that a couple of fronds of kombu should easily enough me enough iodine, but on the actual packets of the kombu I buy the numbers it gives are far, far lower. Iodine is apparantly very volatile, so I wouldn't be surprised if lots can easily be lost by any processing/packaging. I tend to soak and cook it as gently as possible. Kombu seems to be better than wakame or dulse, with nori being by far the worse for iodine.

Other seafood is also excellent as a general rule, especially haddock. Back when I was eating tinned sardines as a staple I assume iodine wasn't a problem. I don't know where specifically in fish the iodine is stored, so I'd recommend going for as close to the whole fish as possible.

I also used to get a lot of iodine from cheese, back when I was getting most of my calories from dairy (or at least I was in theory, it depends on the quality of their feed apparantly). Nowadays the only other appreciable source of iodine I get is from eggs (again, in theory, but I'm hoping my omega-3 eggs are well fed).

Iodine salt would be a good bet obviously, although here apparantly freshness matters a great deal as it rapidly loses iodine content on the shelf.

I also have a pet theory that sweetbreads (thymus gland) should contain a lot, given iodine's use for the thyroid and the fact that it's stored in the thymus in humans. I always treat my thymus glands especially gently when cooking therefore, given the volatility of iodine.

60b0d3e60670f645cca59f67710b4820

(399)

on February 15, 2010
at 10:18 PM

Iodized salt is either supplemented with iodide or iodate salts, neither of which is volatile.

60b0d3e60670f645cca59f67710b4820

(399)

on February 15, 2010
at 08:45 PM

Iodide is not volatile, only molecular iodine is.

70d9359a2086e890a4c3bccb2ba8a8cb

(2254)

on February 16, 2010
at 06:44 PM

@David Moss: thanks for the reference! Sounds interesting, and it's spurred me to look for more information on iodine's role in the body. Might have a go at trying sweetbreads as well.

70d9359a2086e890a4c3bccb2ba8a8cb

(2254)

on February 15, 2010
at 08:36 PM

Is iodine stored in the thymus in humans, or did you mean thyroid? Genuinely asking because they're not the same organ, and I knew about iodine storage in the thyroid (and the fundamental role it plays in its function), but never heard of it being associated with the thymus (which is usually very atrophic and inactive in adults).

E35e3d76547b18096a59c90029e7e107

(15613)

on February 15, 2010
at 09:04 PM

@ Arhcaea. Yes I did mean thymus http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19647627 @ Durandal Thanks. I'd gotten the impression from Dr Davis that that all sources of iodine would lose it rapidly ("Salt that sits on the shelf for more than a month is devoid of iodine, given iodine's volatility"), but on rereading I see that it's possible to interpret that as only applying to iodine added to salt. http://heartscanblog.blogspot.com/2009/06/what-kind-of-iodine-do-you-take.html

E35e3d76547b18096a59c90029e7e107

(15613)

on February 16, 2010
at 07:36 PM

@archaea Np, your point about the thymus atrophying down to just fat in adults is quite important to me too- makes me think I should go only for lamb thymus (all I've had so far) because they'll be younger and more active, I assume. @ Durandal. Right you are then, Dr Davis is not infallible. Do you know how much foods would lose iodine from other mechanisms, i.e. sitting on the shelf, exposed to heat in cooking or being lost into cooking water.

0
09e3a4b532dd8898d8eee23d1d8e121c

on April 20, 2011
at 12:38 AM

I take drops of Lugol's iodine solution in water. One drop every week or so. And then a bunch more - 8-25 drops in water whenever I get a scratchy throat or the chills.

Be1dbd31e4a3fccd4394494aa5db256d

(17969)

on April 20, 2011
at 12:59 AM

www.swansonvitamins.com for Lugol's.

5e36f73c3f95eb4ea13a009f4936449f

(8280)

on April 20, 2011
at 12:43 AM

Lugols is a bit hard to find after the Japan rush (people were freaking out on getting iodine). I imagine it'll be back and more available in the coming months.

-1
Medium avatar

(5136)

on April 20, 2011
at 12:08 AM

So I pretty much only use Pink Himalayan Salt in my salt grinder. It was cheap and I prefer the strong mineral taste to that of other salts. http://www.wbminternational.com/index.php?/pink-salt-84-jar-w/shaker-coarse5305.html

i cook just about everything at home from scratch, (occasionally we'll have some local bacon) so pretty much my salt intake comes from what I'm putting in. I dont have an issue with using salt so I salt to taste, fairly liberally. This salt is not iodized but supposedly contains natural iodine (and other minerals). We eat seafood occasionally, but not as often as I might like. I love seaweed salad, but I haven't had it in over a year, as it's not available around here (bummer). The eggs we get are pretty darn healthy though and clearly well fed. (Lady who sells them claims no soy no corn). I do eat some dairy still. I'm trying to guestimate if I'm getting enough iodine in my diet, mostly due to a few comments about its importance in recent threads I've been reading. Thoughts?

edit: i'm not even sure what an optimal amount of iodine would be or how to come up with a guideline for such things.

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