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Food Breakdown Information -- As Much Detail As Possible

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created June 14, 2011 at 4:05 PM

At first I learned about food groups. I learned I had to eat some veggies, some fruit, some meat, ect...

Then I learned about macronutrients. I needed to balance fats, protein, fiber, ect...

Now I'm learning about mineral compositions, Omega 3-6-9's, and their effects.

The hard part for me, is that all of this information is not located in the same place. I may find info about the Omega 3:6 ratio of food, but there's nothing about how much calcium or Vitamin D it has.

Can anyone suggest a place where I can find an as-detailed-as-possible breakdown of foods and their makeup? I'd love to evaluate my current diet to see if I'm leaving anything out, but so far its so cumbersome trying to figure out what each food item is bringing to the table that it seems impossible. Someone HAS to have put it all in one place at some point. Does anyone know where they put it?

332d9f75d1077abafff6887681f6b130

(1081)

on June 14, 2011
at 06:27 PM

I'd imagine these numbers work off of an average. Some steaks may have more iron than others, but if you eat steaks you're going to get SOME iron in your system. That's what I'm looking for at this point. I'm not planning to plan my meals to the "T" I'm just wanting to make sure that the foods I'm eating have a good representation of the stuff I need.

016fbff1380d44389b2c1e5bc54d07f0

(115)

on June 14, 2011
at 05:44 PM

Correct, you can go straight to the source, but I think info-design adds something.

425aa4bfb79556ed50ea693c3edd7e13

(609)

on June 14, 2011
at 05:35 PM

They're just using the USDA data. The real question is why the other sites (like livestrong/myplate) don't bother to use it.

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3 Answers

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3
016fbff1380d44389b2c1e5bc54d07f0

(115)

on June 14, 2011
at 05:11 PM

http://nutritiondata.self.com/

Totally not where I'd expect it, but someone behind that site knows what they're doing.

  1. Register (free)
  2. Search for a food
  3. Click "add to tracking"
  4. Click "save and analyze"

At least, I think that's the gist of it... navigation is a bit busy and might take some fiddling.

From there you can add a typical day, they have fatty acid ratios etc and helpful visuals.

I'm all for eating intuitively over time, but as a data geek it's nice to inform my intuition in the beginning.

016fbff1380d44389b2c1e5bc54d07f0

(115)

on June 14, 2011
at 05:44 PM

Correct, you can go straight to the source, but I think info-design adds something.

425aa4bfb79556ed50ea693c3edd7e13

(609)

on June 14, 2011
at 05:35 PM

They're just using the USDA data. The real question is why the other sites (like livestrong/myplate) don't bother to use it.

1
6b8d12fc3e43179f9ae1765a4d1a9dc2

(5914)

on June 15, 2011
at 12:06 PM

Try the Cron-O-Meter. You can download it and enter in the foods that you eat and it will give you a breakdown. Its not prefect but it works pretty well.

0
510bdda8988ed0d4b0ec0b738b4edb73

(20888)

on June 14, 2011
at 05:26 PM

There's a difference between "as detailed as possible" and "accurate". For example, the mineral content in food is totally dependent on the dirt it was grown in which varies greatly. There's no real way to know exactly what you're getting, and tricking yourself that you're being accurate with all of these details does more harm than good. Just try to get a variety of real whole foods from many different sources and you'll be better off than geeking out on inaccurate information.

332d9f75d1077abafff6887681f6b130

(1081)

on June 14, 2011
at 06:27 PM

I'd imagine these numbers work off of an average. Some steaks may have more iron than others, but if you eat steaks you're going to get SOME iron in your system. That's what I'm looking for at this point. I'm not planning to plan my meals to the "T" I'm just wanting to make sure that the foods I'm eating have a good representation of the stuff I need.

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